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Archive for January, 2021

Robin Hood (The Movie, Not the Not-So-Free Fee-Free Stock Trading App)

31 Jan

January 31, 1936

I Cover Hollywood

Lloyd Pantages
Los Angeles Examiner

Errol Flynn will do Robin Hood for Warners before he begins The Charge of the Light Brigade, which should be good news for the public. Overnight, after his one picture, Captain Blood, he’s become a worldwide sensation.

Errol in Charge: Out of the Woods and Into the Desert

— Gentleman Tim

 

Lili and Bruce (and Not Errol) at the World Premier of The Good Earth

30 Jan

January 30, 1937

Premire of The Good Earth

Joan Crawford with Franchot Tone..

Surprise arrrival of the evening was this.. Lili Damita with Bruce Cabot!

Miss Data has been reported reconciled with Errol Flynn, and Cabot reconciled with Adienne Ames.

Bruce Cabot and Tiger Lil’ circa the World Premier of The Good Earth

Bruce Cabot and his wife, Adrienne Ames, apparently having a not-so-happy day at the track

“The film’s premiere took place in Los Angeles at the Carthay Circle Theatre on 29 Jan 1937, followed by a New York premiere at the Astor Theatre on 2 Feb. News items reported extensive preparations for both premieres, especially in Los Angeles where art director associate Harry Oliver supervised the decoration of San Vicente Blvd. (the street on which the Carthay Circle Theatre was located) in a Chinese style. A fifty-foot replica of the novel was also constructed on a corner of the intersection of Wilshire and San Vicente Blvd. near the theater. Prominent writers P. G. Wodehouse, Rupert Hughes and Jim Tully were present at the premiere to write impromptu reviews and immediately send them across the nation via wire service. The premiere was broadcast over radio via the Mutual System and, according to a 29 Jan 1937 HR news item, was the first premiere to be covered on a national network.”

So it might have been broadcast nationwide that Lili attended with Cabot?

Photos including Bruce Cabot above are from the approximate timeframe of The Good Earth World Premiere, but not from the premiere

— Gentleman Tim

 

Happy Birthday, Mr. Presidents — Featuring FDR, Errol Flynn, and Baby Joe Biden

29 Jan

January 29, 1939

Dinner and a Play with FDR and Errol Flynn

7:45pm – 8:50pm: Dinner at the White House with ER, Household, Errol Flynn, Miss Malvina Thompson, Mrs. Helm

8:50pm – 11:10pm – “Outward Bound” at the National Theater with ER, James Roosevelt, Jr., Errol Flynn, Marguerite A. LeHand , Miss Malvina Thompson, Mrs. Helm, Miss Connochie, Miss Henderson, Mr. and Mrs. Hendrik van Loon


“Tonight all of us are going to see: “Outward Bound.” I have no fear about the evening, for I know that the play, as well as the cast, is among the finest in the theatre today. We are deeply appreciative of the generosity of the cast. They have come down from New York City to give this performance at their own expense for the benefit of the Infantile Paralysis Fund.” – Eleanor Roosevelt

“All of our guests last night sang “Happy Birthday” to the President just as the clock struck midnight, which was a nice beginning for his birthday. All the young movie stars are here today to help him celebrate his birthday by making the birthday balls a success throughout this city.” – Eleanor Roosevelt


This is a play program for President Roosevelt’s birthday celebration in association with The Playhouse Company and the National Theatre Directors. A command performance of “Outward Bound” by Sutton Vane. Directed by Otto Preminger and staring some of the greats like Laurette Taylor, Florence Reed , Helen Chandler and Vincent Price. Preformed at the National Theatre, Washington, D.C. on Sunday evening, January 29, 1939. — with Errol Flynn as a special guest of the President.

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Birthday Boy Biden Born When FDR was President and Errol Flynn Ruled in Hollywood

When Joe Biden was born, World War II raged. Franklin D. Roosevelt was in his third term as president, Errol Flynn was a Hollywood heartthrob, and Glenn Miller was the top recording artist in the country.

— Gentleman Tim

 

Once Upon a Time…

28 Jan

ONCE upon a time, long before Errol Flynn ever heard of Hollywood or thought of being an actor, he bought a little sailing ship…


January 28, 1937

Harrison Carroll
Evening Herald Express

Errol Flynn’s book, Beam Ends, must be expected to do all right because the publishers haved already ordered a second edition published.

— Gentleman Tim

 

“The Party is On”

27 Jan

January 27, 1949

Louella O. Parsons
Los Angeles Examiner

I couldn’t have been more surprised when a message was left at my house “to hold February 12 for a dinner-dance at the home of Errol Flynn, please.”

Ever since his rift with Nora, Errol g]has been serving few of his old friends and has been giving no parties at all, even though he is one of our finest hosts. But sure enough, the party is on.

I think this is because Errol is really happy making Forsythe Saga and is to be gay and forget his domestic troubles. If he and Greer Garson ever had any disagreements that’s all in the past. He says she is one of the most intelligent, talent and swell girls he has ever worked with.

— Gentleman Tim

 

The Prince, the Pauper, and the Malarial Superstar (Plus a Sick Director)

26 Jan

The Prince, the Pauper, and the Malarial Superstar (Plus a Sick Director)

January 27, 1937

Harrison Carroll

Evening Herald Express

Errol Flynn is back at work on The Prince and the Pauper after days out with the flu and malaria.

January 28, 1937

Elizabeth Yeaman

Hollywood Citizen News

The Prince and the Pauper has been plagued by flu. Errol Flynn, the star, was out of the cast for two weeks with a combined attack of flu and malaria. He finally reported for work on Monday. And todaydirector William Keighley took to his bed with flu. So William Dieterle has been rushed in to complete the picture which should be finished within another week.

HISTORY AND DOCUMENTATION OF ERROL’S MALARIA

Part 1

Errol’s Malaria

Errol’s Malaria — Part 1 — Blood-Thirsty Ann

Part II

Bitten in New Britain

Errol’s Malaria — Part 2 — Bitten in New Britain? … Or was it New Ireland? Or was it New Hanover? Or ….

Part III

Recurrences

Errol’s Malaria – Part 3 – Reports of Recurrences

— Gentleman Tim

 

Travelin’ On

24 Jan

I wish you all smooth sailing…

January 23, 1936

Pirate Party on Catalina

Film Daily

With Buddy Rogers and Band, Marion Davies, Cary Grant, Virginia Bruce, John Gilbert, Chester Morris, Lee Tracy, Lili Damita, Errol Flynn, Sid Silvers, Robert Armstrong.

(Musical Review Series)

MGM – 20 Minutes

A STANDOUT

There is more attractive flash, sparkling action and general entertainment in this two-reeler than in some features. Very effectively filmed in Technicolor, it takes the form of of a pirate masquerade party on beautiful Catalina Island, where scores of film stars happen to be present and thus give the film a big-time cast and bif fan interest. Charles “Buddy” Rogers and his orchestra provide the musical background and are an act in themselves. Chester Morris acts as master of ceremonies, doing a nice job of it and working in a number of big bits with Sid Silvers and other performers. The picture has plenty of flash in the way of eye-filling girlies, and things are kept lively by interpolation of aquatic action and a generally rapid succession of novelty numbers and star closeups. Lewis Lewyn produced it.

Pirate Party on Catalina Island (Full Movie)

We’re In the Money – With a Pirate Treasure Chorus Line

Buddy Rogers and His California Cavaliers

Boatful of Banjos and an Anchors Away Chorus Line – Mickey Rooney on Percussion

— Gentleman Tim

 

Errol Flynn at the Palace

24 Jan

January 24, 1957

Bosley Crowther
New York Times

THERE is something excessively familiar about Universal’s “Istanbul,” which came yesterday to the Palace, and it isn’t just Errol Flynn. Mr. Flynn, looking heavily enameled about the eyes and the jaws, is a clearly familiar figure out of the not too distant past, but the script of this color picture goes away back into the years.It is, to put it briefly, one of those pictures about some missing “jools”—the same being $200,000 in diamonds that Mr. Flynn, a transient in Turkey, has stashed away. They have fallen into his hands by purest accident; but, once he has them, he sees no reason why he should turn them over to some crooks who want them or to the customs men. Neither does he see any reason why he should part with Cornell Borchers, a very tasty bit of Germanic femininity, with whom he is madly in love, when she loses her memory in a fire and marries another man. The lady is almost as important as the “jools” to him. However, he does give up the baubles (when it looks as if he is going to be caught with them, anyhow) and is prepared to give up Miss Borchers. Then her husband, Torin Thatcher, sees that there’s no point in trying to foil love, and he commits the lady reluctantly but manfully to Mr. Flynn.There is nothing to distinguish this production. The color is good and the CinemaScope inserts of the city by the Golden Horn are nice.

The Cast: ISTANBUL, screen play by Seton Miller, Barbara Gray and Richard Alan Simmons; based on a story by Mr. Miller; directed by Joseph Pevney and produced by Albert J. Cohen for Universal-International. At the Palace.Jim Brennan . . . . . Errol Flynn; Stephanie Bauer . . . . . Cornell Borchers: Karen Fielding; Inspector Nural . . . . . John Bentley; Douglas Fielding . . . . . Torin Thatcher; Charlie Boyle . . . . . Leif Erickson; Marge Boyle . . . . . Peggy Knudsen; Mr. Darius . . . . . Martin Benson; Danny Rice . . . . . Nat (King) Cole; Paul Renkov . . . . . Werner Klernperer

A version of this article appears in print on Jan. 24, 1957 of the National edition with the headline: The Screen: ‘Istanbul’; Errol Flynn Appears in Palace film.

With his friend, the Great Nat King Cole,performing this stunningly beautiful version of ‘When I Fall in Love’:

And with his gorgeous co-star. Cornell Borchers:

— Gentleman Tim

 

January 23, 1942 — Who was She?

23 Jan

She was famous, and so was her husband.

On the evening of January 23, 1942, she had dinner with friends and watched “They Died with Their Boots On” and found it very thrilling. They also watched news reels.

Who was she?

— Gentleman Tim

 

All Hail Alan Hale

22 Jan

On the 71st Anniversary of His Passing
January 22, 1950

Alan Hale was one of Hollywood’s greatest character actors. Mostly remembered for his performances with Errol Flynn, he also played in films supporting Lon Chaney, Wallace Beery, Douglas Fairbanks, James Cagney, Clark Gable, Cary Grant, Humphrey Bogart, and Ronald Reagan.

He appeared with Errol in all the following:

The Prince and the Pauper (1937)
The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938)
The Sisters (1938)
Dodge City (1939)
The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex (1939)
Virginia City (1940)
The Sea Hawk (1940)
Santa Fe Trail (1940)
Footsteps in the Dark (1941)
Desperate Journey (1942)
Gentleman Jim (1942)
Adventures of Don Juan (1948)

..And in Thank Your Lucky Stars (1943), but not together.

From one of the many top shelf posts of TCM TomJH of the TCM Message Board – excerpted discussions regarding Alan Hale’s work and personal relationship with Errol Flynn, and a segment regarding EFB Author Steve Hayes.

“Alan Hale, Character Actor Support Par Excellence”

December 17, 2017 in General Discussions

“Flynn and Hale have such a great camaraderie in their films together and you can tell that they really were friends in real life.

Hale brought so much to the Flynn films beyond just his performance. You always had the feeling of observing two friends having fun together.”

Gentleman Jim


“Gentleman Jim (1942). A father once again, this time to Flynn’s boxing dandy Jim Corbett in another Walsh-directed turn-of-the-century affair. Hale has a riot in this film, constantly laughing, throwing phantom punches in the crowd at one of his son’s fights, dancing an Irish jig with the family and getting drunk at a celebration party following Corbett’s triumph in the ring over the legendary John L. Sullivan. At one point Hale is seen staggering home, staring at his outstretched hand, having just shaken the hand of the great Sullivan. When asked by his son what he’s going to do with that hand now, Hale emphatically proclaims, “I’m not even going to wash it!

I couldn’t find a photo of this moment on Google Images, but one of my favorite parts of Gentleman Jim is the end at the wild celebration party. A chair is thrown through the glass doors, then Hale opens the door. His hair is all mussed and with his eyes and mouth opened wide, and he yells “GIVE ‘EM ROOM! GIVE ‘EM ROOM!”

The Sea Hawk


“I also like Alan Hale with Flynn in The Sea Hawk. At one point, both men (along with the rest of the crew on their ship) are captured and forced into being galley slaves. Flynn and Hale orchestrate a plan to steal a knife from the guard and overtake him, take over the ship and free their crew.

One of Hale’s trademarks was his great “jaw drop” double-take. Watching him and Flynn on screen together was pure joy. That’s one thing that is missing from today’s films – chemistry. We have great actors, but it doesn’t appear that anybody is really having any fun up on the screen any more.”

The Adventures of Don Juan

“There are some scenes between them that I always love to watch in their final film together, Adventures of Don Juan. Hale plays Don Juan’s servant, Leporello, always trying to assist the Don and extricate him from sticky situations, many of them of a humourous nature. But even though his character is a servant Hale plays the role like a friend.

When Flynn is interrupted in his attempted seduction of a woman by her irate husband he leaps from a balcony to the ground below, where Hale awaits dozing. They look a each other (oh, they have been in this same situation so many times before) and there is a simple two word exchange between them.

“Husband,” Flynn’s Don Juan says, a little out of breath.

“Horses,” Hale replies pointing in their direction where they both begin to run.

“One of my favourite little moments between them occurs towards the end. They are sitting at a table, hiding out in a cantina from the military which is hunting for Don Juan with prison, or worse, awaiting him if captured.

Flynn says he must leave Spain but he doesn’t want Hale to accompany him to a life of uncertainty.

“Do you think I would let you go roaming about the universe without me?” Hale says, “I’m going with you!”

“And if I order you to stay?” Flynn says.

“Then I shall disobey you!” Hale emphatically replies.

There’s a lovely closeup of Flynn’s face, a look of warmth in his eyes, as he reaches across the table and briefly places his hand with affection on top of Hale’s. Hale smiles. Done! They will stay together through thick and thin.

What always helps to make this little moment work so well is that it seems a reflection of the friendship that it existed between the two actors.”

A reference to EFB Author Steve Hayes was made as follows in this TCM Message Board Post:

“Steve Hayes is a writer, part time adventurer, who wrote two books about his Hollywood experiences called Googies Coffeeshop to the Stars. For a month he lived in a room in Errol Flynn’s Mulholland home, and got to know the actor quite well, continuing to see him off and on afterward for a while. Among other things, he mentioned that Flynn went into a period of depression due to Alan Hale’s death.”

— Gentleman Tim

 
 
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