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Archive for the ‘Film Trailers’ Category

It’s Fun Being Broke

20 Feb

Friday, February 19, 1937
National Syndication

Errol Flynn and Anita Louise, stars of the Cosmopolitan production “Green Light” which is now playing at the State Theatre as a First National release, have found in the film based on Lloyd C. Douglas’ famous novel roles that give them the most dramatic opportunities of their careers.

“It’s Fun Being Broke” says Film Star Errol Flynn

“I miss being broke!” Errol Flynn, Irish actor and adventurer, who stars in ”Green Light,” a Cosmopolitan production released by First National, opening at the State theatre today, drove his hand far down in his trousers’ pocket and pulled out a neat little fold of bills, held together with a gold clasp. “When you have money,” he announced, “any money, some of the kick is gone out of life. Money makes a man soft, unwilling to take chances. Being broke sharpens your wits.” “Don’t misunderstand me,” he added quickly. “I’m not saying I want to be broke. I just miss finding myself in that condition once in a while. It used to be a fairly regular discovery in my life.”

Asked to list those lean periods and to tell what he did to cure them, Flynn leaned far back on his dressing room couch and squinted at the ceiling. “There was a time in Sydney, Australia,” he began, “I slept on and under newspapers in a park for four nights. Newspapers make warm bedding. Then on the fifth day I got a job as a bottle smeller.” “Bottle smeller?” “Yes. With a soft drink manufacturer. There was a big pile of bottles and I was to sort them by smell. Those that had had kerosene or turpentine or some thing like that in them, I put on one side. Those that didn’t smell I put on the other. I couldn’t smell anything for weeks after.”

“There was another time in Kavieng, New Guinea, when didn’t have enough money to pay a fine, for knocking down a coolie who had insulted me. I didn’t have any money, but the magistrate didn’t know that. The boat I wanted to catch to another port was due in about a week. I asked the court what the alternative punishment would be if I didn’t pay the fine.” “I’ll have to jail you,” he said, ‘for about a week.’ T said I’d go to jail. He shook his head. ‘You can’t do that,’ he argued, “you know perfectly well there is no jail.’ “But I insisted. So he turned me over to the police master, who was a friend of mine, and I lived with him for a week. It wasn’t any great hardship. But he always urged me to come home early nights.”

“Green Light” is a romantic drama filmed from Lloyd C. Douglas’ best-selling novel of the same name. Some of the others in the cast besides Flynn include Sir Cedric Hardwicke, Anita Louise, Margaret Lindsay, Walter Abel and Henry O’Neill. The adaptation for the screen was made by Milton Krims. Frank Borzage directed.

— Tim

 

Navy Flyboys Cutting in on Errol’s Girl

12 Jan

January 12, 1939

Evening Herald Examiner

Navy Officers, Stars at Film Preview

Wings of the Navy

Film personages attending include: George Brent, Olivia de Havilland, Bette Davis, Paul Muni, Pat O’Brien, Jane Wyman, Ann Sheridan, John Garfield, Errol Flynn. Priscilla Lane, Irene Dunne, Gary Cooper, Mary Pickford, Walt Disney, Spencer Tracy, Francisca Gall, Frank Borzage, Reginald Gardiner, and many Navy Officers.

— Tim

 

On the Seventh Day of Christmas 🎁x7

31 Dec


On December 31, 1980
Raoul Walsh passed away
Leaving us these Errol Flynn masterpieces…….

— Tim

 

A Humble Husband in Love

21 Dec

“Dashed, Not Dashing – A New Type of Role” for Errol

December 22, 1946

— Tim

 

Captain Blood: The Greatest Pirate Movie Ever Made

19 Dec

And “Best Popcorn Movie of the Mid-Thirties”

Released Eighty-Five Years Ago Today
December 19, 1935

— Tim

 

Boots was Made for Watching — “Errol Flynn in His Greatest Role”

21 Nov

November 21, 1941

New York Times

The Warners have been generous to a fault in paying their respects to General George Armstrong Custer. Certainly the man who is more famed for his celebrated last stand against the Sioux and allied tribes at Little Big Horn than for any of his several other exploits receives his due as a courageous soldier, and then some, in “They Died With Their Boots On,” which thundered into the Strand yesterday. Dismiss factual inaccuracies liberally sprinkled throughout the film’s more than two-hour length and you have an adventure tale of frontier days which for sheer scope, if not dramatic impact, it would be hard to equal.

Wave upon wave of cavalry charges packed with breath-taking thrills have been handled in masterly fashion by director Raoul Walsh, and they alone are worth the price of admission. Mr. Walsh, it is obvious, spared neither men, horses nor Errol Flynn’s General Custer in kicking up the dust of battle. But the director was not so fortunate in handling the personal drama and as a consequence “They Died With Their Boots On” has little verve between campaigns. With all the action of the Civil War sequences, it is not surprising that the intervening account of the General’s domestic life and his battle against political intrigue, which lacks genuine dramatic sustenance, should become a little wearying. After all, two hours and seventeen minutes requires a powerful lot of sustained drama. Mr. Walsh would have had a more compact and compelling entertainment had he whittled a half hour or so out of the script. But he more than makes up for this with his action shots.

From what the records show, “They Died With Their Boots On” is the screen’s first full-fledged attempt at spanning Custer’s remarkable career from his hazing as a West Point plebe, his almost story-bookish rise from second lieutenant of cavalry at the first Battle of Bull Run in 1861 to his appointment two years later as brigadier general of volunteers and commander of the Michigan brigade, which performed so brilliantly at Gettysburg. However fanciful the film’s account of his early Army career and the events in between his assignment as lieutenant colonel, Regular Army, of the Seventh Cavalry, may be, it nevertheless provides a broad view of a complex personality.

In the massacre at the Little Big Horn in 1876 the film credits Custer with knowingly sacrificing his small forces to prevent the warring Indians from swooping down upon General Terry’s unsuspecting regiment, a viewpoint in variance with certain historical accounts of the tragedy. Errol Flynn, who approximates the general in physical characteristics, is excellent as the dashing, adventuresome cavalryman. Olivia de Havilland is altogether captivating as his adoring wife. Others in the long cast who acquit themselves with credit are John Litel as General Phil Sheridan, Sidney Greenstreet as General Winfield Scott and Stanley Ridges as the fictitious Major Taipe who engineers Custer’s court-martial. George P. Huntley Jr. gives a magnificent performance as Custer’s fellow-officer and buddie.

THEY DIED WITH THEIR BOOTS ON; screen play by Wally Klein and Aeneas MacKenzie; directed by Raoul Walsh for Warner Brothers.George Armstrong Custer . . . . . Errol Flynn – Elizabeth Becon (Beth Custer) . . . . . Olivia deHavilland – Fitzhugh Lee . . . . . Regis Toomey- Major Romulus Taipe . . . . . Stanley Ridges – Ned Sharp . . . . . Arthur Kennedy – General Scott . . . . . Sidney Greenstreet – William Sharp . . . . . Walter Hampden – General Phil Sheridan . . . . . John Litel – Lieut. Butler . . . . . George P. Huntley Jr. – Crazy Horse . . . . . Anthony Quinn – California Joe . . . . . Charley Grapewin – Sergeant Doolittle . . . . . Joe Sawyer – Captain Webb . . . . . Frank Wilcox – Captain McCook . . . . . Selmer Jackson – Senator Smith . . . . . Minor Watson – Lieut. Frazier . . . . . DeWolf Hopper

A version of this article appears in print on Nov. 21, 1941 of the National edition with the headline: At the Strand.

— Tim

 

The Impact of World War I on Australia

11 Nov

Remembrance Day, 2020

First and Foremost, Thank You and Great Praise to the Amazingly Valorous Veterans and Active Military of Austtralia, Who have Repeatedly and Very Bravely Risked Their Lives and Sacrificed So Much to Help to Save the World from Evil and Oppression Around the Globe….

How Might World War I have Impacted Errol’s Opinions of War?

Quoting:

~ “World War 1 had a profound impact on Australian society. Anzac Day, commemorating the landing of Australian and New Zealand troops on the Gallipoli Peninsula on 25 April 1915, is Australia’s most important commemorative day. The Anzac legend, representing the Australian fighting man as a resourceful, resilient, even cheerful warrior, has become part of Australia’s folklore. It has been an accepted part of the culture for generations of Australians. More recently it has been questioned increasingly. That same Anzac landing really heralded Australia’s entry into the First World War, a war that took nearly 60,000 Australian lives. The tremendous cost of the War (Australia’s casualty rate, in proportion to the number of troops engaged, was higher than for any other country in the British Empire) left an indelible scar on the nation.”

THE DAMAGE INFLICTED ON THE AUSTRALIAN HOMEFRONT

Dawn Patrol 1938, with Australian-American Errol Flynn…

Errol regarding the sometimes destructive nature of man…

Gallipoli 1981, with American-Australian Mel Gibson…

The Water Diviner 2014, with that other Australian Robin Hood

— Tim

 

It’s Errol Flynn! Pin-up Artist

09 Nov

Released November 9, 1946 – NEVER SAY GOODBYE

— Tim

 

Compliments to the Scheffs

17 Oct

October 17, 1938

Evening Herald Express

Bette Davis was preening herself in front of a mirror one day on the set of The Sisters, currently showing at Warners Hollywood and Downtown theaters, when Errol Flynn asked her why she was gazing at herself with such approval.

“Well, I like that.” Bette pretended to be put out. “I’m admiring my hairdress—don’t you like it? You should.” Bette replied, “because I copied it exactly from the hairdress worn by Fritzi Scheff in a picture made of her when she was at the peak of her career.”


I sure hope Bette didn’t burst out singing Fritzi’s big hit “Kiss Me Again” to Flynn! Arno would have had to come to his rescue! (Song begins at 1:50)

— Tim

 

At the TTFF Today

15 Sep

September 15, 2020

Errol Flynn’s Ghost: Hollywood in Havana, in Trinidad + Tabago

Errol Flynn’s Ghost: Hollywood in Havana

— Tim

 
 
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