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Archive for the ‘Films’ Category

“The Uncertain Glory of an April Day”

05 Apr

From “The Two Gentlemen of Verona”, Act 1 scene 3.

— Gentleman Tim

 

WOW! What a Show!

30 Mar

March 29, 1945
Indianapolis Times


History of the Handie Talkie

— Gentleman Tim

 

AKA GHOST MOUNTAIN

27 Mar

In 1950 a car pulls up to an historical marker in the desert on the California-Nevada border. The marker reads:

ROCKY MOUNTAIN, also known as Ghost Mountain

On March 26, 1865, a detachment of Confederate cavalry
crossed the state line into California under secret orders
from Gen. Robert E. Lee to rendezvous at Ghost Mountain
with one Cole Smith, with instructions to place the flag
atop the mountain, and though their mission failed, the
heroism displayed by these gallant men honored the cause
for which they fought so valiantly.

“In 1865, eight horsemen trek across the California desert, arriving at Ghost Mountain. Led by Captain Lafe Barstow (Errol Flynn) of the Mississippi Mountain Rifles. The eight soldiers encounter a man who calls himself California Beal (Howard Petrie). As a last desperate effort to turn the tide of the war, Barstow’s mission is to persuade Cole Smith and his 500 men to raid California on behalf of the Confederacy.”

— Gentleman Tim

 

The Virginia City Premier — March 16, 1940

16 Mar


— Gentleman Tim

 

Errol in Hell-Hot Havana

11 Mar

Released in New York – March 11, 1957

“The opportunity to get a good, 90 minute look at scenic (and in parts, seedy) Havana, the “The Latin Las Vegas” prior to the Castro revolution. THE BIG BOODLE also boasts an interesting cast, with the rare opportunity to see beautiful Italian actress Rory (who retired at 35 after barely a dozen films); the stunning, but troubled Scala; and of course, Flynn. If you’re a fan of any of them or the locale you’ll want THE BIG BOODLE in your collection.”

— Gentleman Tim

 

aka F.X. Pettijohn — Errol Flynn, Like You’ve Never Seen Him Before

09 Mar

Footsteps in the Dark
Released March 8, 1941

“Ralph Bellamy said Flynn was “a darling. Couldn’t or wouldn’t take himself seriously. And he drank like there was no tomorrow. Had a bum ticker from the malaria he’d picked up in Australia. Also a spot of TB. Tried to enlist but flunked his medical, so he drank some more. Knew he wouldn’t live into old age. He really had a ball in Footsteps in the Dark. He was so glad to be out of swashbucklers.””

— Gentleman Tim

 

Fred and Errol

05 Mar

New York Times
Douglas W. Churchill

Fred MacMurray Will Co-Star With Errol Flynn in ‘Dive Bomber’ for Warners

Fred MacMurray Will Co-Star With Errol Flynn in ‘Dive Bomber’ for Warners

HOLLYWOOD, Calif., Fred MacMurray will be co-starred with Errol Flynn in Warner’s “Dive Bomber,” which will go before the cameras in ten days with Michael Curtiz directing, the studio has announced.

— Gentleman Tim

 

Not for Nothing

01 Mar

February 29, 1940

Sidney Skolsky
Watching Them Make Pictures

If you wait long enough on a Michael Curtiz set, you’re bound to hear a Curtizism. The other afternoon on the set of The Sea Hawk I had a long wait. In fact for the first time I thought reliable Mike was going to fail me. Director Curtiz had Errol play a scene over and over. And everytime he gave an order I expected him to pull a gem. But he didn’t.

Finally, Errol did the scene the way Curtiz wanted and reliable Mike came through. He said: “Errol, you worked hard. But it’s alright. You can’t get anything for nothing unless you pay for it.”

— Gentleman Tim

 

“A Follow-up to Robin Hood”

28 Feb

February 27, 1939

Louella O. Parsons
Los Angeles Examiner

How would you like to see the dashing Errol Flynn as the equally dashing Don Juan? Academy award winning producer Hal Wallis is plotting such a story as a follow-up to Robin Hood.

Nearly a decade later…

— Gentleman Tim

 

Cameraman & Referee: Best Assignment He Ever Had

26 Feb

On February 26, 2006, the American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) presented its Lifetime Achievement Award to Richard Kline. a prestigious honor presented annually to an individual who has made exceptional and enduring contributions to the art of filmmaking.

Richard Kline was born on Nov. 15, 1926, into a Los Angeles family that included three prominent ASC cinematographers: his father, Benjamin H. Kline, and two uncles, Sol Halperin and Philip Rosen. However, he said, he took up camera work at age 16 not out of any great love for the craft — his passion was surfing — but because World War II was raging, and his father believed such training would help him qualify for a camera unit when he was called to serve. He started at Columbia Pictures in 1943 as a slate boy on the Technicolor musical Cover Girl, and by the time he entered the U.S. Navy the following year, he had advanced to first assistant cameraman, spending two months in Acapulco filming The Lady from Shanghai. “Welles was brilliant, and here I was, this kid along for the ride.”

“In Acapulco, we used Errol Flynn’s yacht, The Zaca. Apart from a brief cameo, Flynn did not appear in Shanghai”

“Errol Flynn and Orson Welles were quite a pair. There was never a dull moment.” “We were on location down in Acapulco and it was a very wild time.” “Errol lent his yacht to Orson for the film. Errol himself served as the skipper.”

“Along with the rest of the crew, one of Kline’s responsibilities was to referee the nightly bar fights that would break out between Welles and Flynn after the two had spent several hours heavily “unwinding.””

Orson, Rita and Chula

Orson and Richard Kline

In order to shoot the location sequences, a company of 50 Hollywood actors and technicians flew to Acapulco, along with 60 Mexican extra players and technicians from Mexico City. More than 15 tons of equipment were shipped from Hollywood, one order of six tons comprising the largest single air express shipment ever undertaken by a movie location company.

Scenes were filmed above and below decks, at anchorages in Acapulco Harbor, at Fort San Diego in Acapulco Bay, at Morro Rocks and other scenic spots, as well as at sea. A lavish new night club, Ciro’s, located atop the swank Casablanca Hotel in Acapulco, also served as a setting, as did the 25-mile stretch of white sand beach at Pied de la Cuesta.

The transportation of heavy sound and camera equipment through the tangled Mexican jungle was a major problem, but overcome by the sheer manpower of several hundred Mexican porters and canoe men. Sound trucks and generators were placed on native canoes lashed together to form barges, and then were floated through jungle-cluttered streams into shooting position.

“Shooting aboard the yacht was, from the space standpoint very difficult, and these scenes, as they appear in the picture, are necessarily cramped in composition — but this actually worked in favor of the overall effect because it produced an authentic atmosphere of crowded life aboard a small yacht.”

During filming aboard The Zaca, a long line of native dugout canoes anchored astern formed a bridge from the barge holding the generator so that electrical cables could be stretched for the camera and sound equipment.

Said Kline six decades later: ” It was the best assignment I ever had,”

(Left) On location in Mexico, Welles briefs his crew prior to filming a sequence. (Center) The Zaca is anchored in Acapulco Harbor. Astern are a line of barges over which electrical cable was stretched between the yacht and the generator boat. (Right) For a scene shot in the jungle streams of Mexico, the camera is mounted on a dugout canoe alongside the boat in which the principle players ride.

— Gentleman Tim