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Archive for the ‘Films’ Category

The Dawn Patrol at The Carolina Theatre!

09 Aug

The Carolina Theatre, 1938 advertising Errol Flynn staring in “The Dawn Patrol.” You can see this photograph at the Regional History Museum downtown Spartanburg! #spartanburghistory #southcarolinahistory #errolflynn #theatrehistory The Regional History Museum is open Tuesday – Friday 10am-5pm and Saturday 11am-4pm.

— David DeWitt

 

Flynn, by a Knockout! Perfect Specimen!

10 Jun

Flynn’s opponent later became a personal assistant in Hollywood to Daryl Zanuck …

DAILY ADVERTISER NSW

Friday 16 December 1938Page 6

Tasmanlan-born film star, knocked out Captain Aidan Roark, the international polo player. A brawl occurred at a cocktail party at the home of socially prominent Mrs Jock Whitney. Spectators say that
after the knockout a friend of Roark’s rushed forward and punched Flynn in the jaw, loosening a tooth. Flynn is 6ft 2in in height, and weighs 12st 12lb. He was discovered by Mr. Charles
Chauvel, and his first screen appearance was as Fletcher Christian in the Australian production, ‘In the Wake of the Bounty.’ The last two films in which Australia has seen him were the Hollywood productions of ‘The Perfect Specimen’ and ‘Robin Hood.’ Captain Roark’s height and weight are
not on record locally. A Captain Roark played No. 3 at polo for England against the United States in 1927 and again in 1930.

The Perfect Specimen

The Lux Radio Theatre. January 2, 1939. CBS net. “The Perfect Speciman”. Sponsored by: Lux Soap. A multi-millionaire bred to be “a perfect speciman,” takes off to be his own man and avoid his dominating grandmother. Dr. Floyd L. Ruch, an associate professor of psychology is interviewed. Joan Blondell has trouble reading her script during the post-story interview.

Errol Flynn, Joan Blondell, May Robson, Cecil B. DeMille, Lou Merrill (performer, commercial spokesman), Frank Nelson (performer, program opening announcer), Byron K. Foulger, Lindsay MacHarrie, Alma Lloyd, Clem Bevins, Eddie Waller (doubles), Ross Forrester, Gay Seabrook, Billy Bletcher, Bob Burleson (doubles), Earle Ross (doubles), Lou Fulton, Edward Marr (doubles), Louis Silvers (music director), Samuel Hopkins Adams (author), Melville Ruick (announcer), Norman Reilly Raine (screenwriter), Lawrence Riley (screenwriter), Brewster Morse (screenwriter), Fritz Falkenstein (screenwriter), Caroline Frasher, Raoul DeLeon, Gil Patric, David Kerman, Margaret Brayton, Floyd L. Ruch (intermission guest), Frank Woodruff (director), George Wells (adaptor), Charlie Forsyth (sound effects). 59:37.

“A constable in the New Guinea police at 17, an overseer of a copra plantation, then collumnist for a Sydney Australian newspaper, master of a trading boat, gold prospector, memner of the Australian Boxing Team in the 1928 Olympics- he’s never stopped roving.” Dawn Patrol has just been released. Flynn planning trip to Cat Cay in Bahamas for giant tuna fishing in the early spring. He also plans to sail Sirocco II in the annual race from California to Hawaii in the summer.

_____________________________________________

— David DeWitt

 

Backstabbing Bruce Sues Errol

25 May


May 25, 1955

New York Times

Cabot Sues Errol Flynn

In May 1955 Bruce Cabot sued Flynn in a London court alleging an unpaid salary of £17,357 ($48,599.60) saying he had been promised four weeks’ work on the film but did not get it.

Cabot knew well of Errol’s dire financial circumstances, but sued him anyhow – kicking hi8m while he was down, despite nearly twenty years of friendship, or, rather, mooching off Errol.

— Tim

 

The Last Man

18 May

In an Avalanche of Adventure

May 18, 1943

Syracuse Herald Journal

FLYNN COLLAPSES ON HOLLYWOOD SET

Actor Errol Flynn was recovering today at Hollywood Hospital after collapsing on a Warner Bros. set.

he was expected to remain in the hospital for at least a week. His physicians, Dr. Carl F. Stevens and Thomas W. Hern, said Flynn suffered “a recurrence of an upper respiratory ailment” which he has had for some time.

Flynn collapsed yesterday while working on To the Last Man. Action will be shot around him until he returns.

Northern Pursuit was originally known as To the Last Man and was based on a magazine story. A.I. Bezzerides wrote the first screenplay under the supervision of Jesse L. Lasky. William Faulkner later worked on the script.

According to Tony Thomas:

“During the production of Northern Pursuit, Flynn took ill in May 1943, collapsing on the set and being hospitalized for a week. The studio released information indicating he had a “upper respiratory ailment,” but he was battling tuberculosis.”

— Tim

 

Mail Bag! Olivia Explains …

16 May

Our own Karl Holmberg sends this delightful interview from 1978 with Olivia de Havilland …

 

Thanks, Karl…

— David DeWitt

 

Mail Bag! Reagan, Flynn and Wayne?

15 May

Our Portugal based friend Audie spotted this and send it along …

Here’s the nearest that John Wayne and Ronald Reagan came to acting in the same feature film. (Sadly, not all that close):

Olivia, Flynn and a future President (as George Custer).

In April, 1940, Warner Bros. set up the semi-Western Santa Fe Trail as a vehicle for Errol Flynn and Olivia de Havilland. The plot followed the exploits of army officers J.E.B. Stuart and George Armstrong Custer after their graduation from West Point.

As per usual, the brothers Warner were free and easy with facts, given that Stuart graduated from the academy in 1854 and Custer matriculated in 1861, and the two men didn’t know one another. The Hollywood rationale? “Come on, already! This is a movie! At least both of them graduated from the Point!”

Duke Wayne, now in the A-list category thanks to Stagecoach and Dark Command, was approached by Warners to play the George Custer role. Wayne, however, turned up his nose at the part, having no desire to play second banana to Flynn (then Warner Bros.’s biggest star), even though the flick was a big-budget epic.

Undaunted, Warners cast contract player Dennis Morgan as Custer, but Denny fell out due to a scheduling conflict. At which point, up-and-comer Ronald Reagan, fresh from his triumph as George Gipp in Knute Rockne, All American, was hurriedly awarded the role.

Mr. Reagan, aware he was a last-minute replacement, later recalled how a frazzled studio tailor rushed into his dressing room to refit a Santa Fe Trail cavalry costume:

It occurred to me then that it would be just as easy someday to throw my clothes in a corner and hang some other actor’s in their place. …

If John Wayne had been less finicky about the parts he accepted, the “other actor” in Santa Fe Trail would have been the Big Cowboy and not Ronald Reagan portraying George A. Custer.

This is as close as the two ever got to acting in the same film: they were both offered the same part.

Postscript: “SFT” was a highly profitable film that boosted Reagan’s career. It fell into the Public Domain when United Artists Television neglected to renew the copyright.

 

 

 

— David DeWitt

 
 

Location Location Location

11 May

May 11, 1940
The Weekly Wireless

THE HIGH COST OF GRASSHOPPERS

Miriam Hopkins in three moods -demure, gay and grim. The swash buckler is, as you probably guessed, none other than Errol Flynn.

The appearance of a grasshopper in the leading
lady’s bed may wreck a million-dollar movie. That’s why location-man hates arranging locations, especially for films such as
Warner’s spectacular “Virginia City,” made at Flagstaff, with Miriam Hopkins and Errol Flynn.

The stars, director Michael Curtiz, and about a hundred others spent six weeks on the famed
Painted Desert.

Only those who have been on “location” trips can have any idea of the headaches involved. Joe Barry, who handled the “Virginia City” job, estimated the expense og the trip at approximately £20,000, over and above regular salaries and production costs.

But money was the least of his worries. A location invariably offers unexpected problems, which may vary from finding lost children to the discovery of a grasshopper in the leading lady’s bed.

He can figure almost exactly the cost of train fare and freight. He can allow £2OOO, more or less, for food for the company, and not be far wrong.

Even if Miss Hopkins had insisted on strawberries for breakfast, or if Mr. Flynn had called for a special kind of beef to keep up his flagging strength, the final totals would not have been changed much. But there are other expenses which cannot be budgeted so closely. There are the items of rent and feed for horses needed, in addition to those taken from Hollywood, accommodation and food for drivers of trucks and buses from the studio and those hired “on the ground.”

Flagstaff, where the company had to stay, is a small town of 4000 inhabitants, with three small hotels and a limited number of restaurants.
The problem of assigning living quarters and eating places was no small one, and arrangements for doctors, nurses, dentists, barbers, laundries, and filling stations had to be made.
Dry-cleaning alone presents a problem in a small community. Even though he allowed £3OO for that
item, he had to be sure that the local cleaners could give him the overnight service he needed.
He had to get local people to serve as extras, and this invariably led to hard feelings on the part of those he did not employ.

A location-man must, if possible, re-route any regular plane service over the location. Railroad whistles have to be suppressed.. Officials of all kinds must be met, wheedled, placated, and side-tracked. Sometimes fences had to be removed, and replaced later,and roads had to be covered up. (“Virginia City” starts in American Civil War times, so that motor cars and their tracks must be kept well out of sight.)

Irate neighbors in the vicinity who had not been employed by the company chopped wood and beat
on tubs, to the dismay of the sound men, until Joe appeased them.

Fire hazards had to be watched, dry creeks to be flushed with water dragged miles in tanks, a telephone from the company headquarters to the home studio had to be kept open continuously.

On any location at night there are standing-room-only signs before the theatres and cafes. Ice cream is at a premium. The studio had to
put up a big bond that no liquor will be allowed on the Indian reservation near the “Virginia City” camp.

Joe brought the “Virginia City” location back to Hollywood according to budget. But he lost weight doing it. He always does.

ERROL’S LETTER ABOUT THE LOCATION



DICKIE JONES’S MEMORIES OF ERROL AND FLAGSTAFF

Did you stay in Flagstaff while filming Virginia City?

DICK JONES: Oh yeah, I remember it real well. I just about ate myself to death with trout. I loved it. I actually came back to Flagstaff later that year to do The Outlaw.

What can you tell us about the personal appearance you made at Flagstaff’s Orpheum Theater while filming here?

I don’t remember it at all. I probably did a trick roping act, because that was the only thing I knew. (Laughing) I could strum a ukulele but that wouldn’t have been much!

Do you have memories of working with Errol Flynn in Virginia City?

The one thing I can remember was that he had this standard-sized schnauzer. He had that dog trained. [Flynn] had this swagger stick and he’d be slapping his boot with it, then he’d stop to talk to somebody and he’d slap them on their boot with that swagger stick. Then when he walked away the dog would come up and lift its leg up on them. I think [co-star] “Big Boy” Williams almost wanted to kill him!

I really enjoyed working with Errol Flynn. I worked with him again on Rocky Mountain (1950); that was my favorite of all the films I ever made. [Flynn] was one of the best journeyman actors. He knew his trade and worked his craft real well.

— Tim

 

For Young People of All Ages

07 May

Released May 8, 1937

Based on Mark Twain’s Classic


Released just in time for the Coronation of King George V, four days later, May 12, 1937

In celebration of which this beautiful couple had their first real-life dance, at the Coronation Ball at the Cocoanut Grove in Los Angeles, attended by the Hollywood Rajah:

— Tim

 

Voyaging Star

06 May

MAY 6, 1938

Voyaging Star Appears Next in ‘White Rajah’ or ‘The Sea, Hawk’

SAILS YACHT TO N. Y.

By LOUELLA 0. PARSONS Hollywood,

Warner’s wandering boy, Errol Flynn, has promised at long last to bring his boat into the New York harbor May 12. At least that’s what the brothers Warner hope will happen. That would land him in the big town just in time for the opening of his most successful picture, “The Adventures of Robin Hood.” After he attends the premiere, Flynn will fly to Hollywood and get ready to star in either “The Sea Hawk,” Sabatini’s romantic sea story, or in “The White Rajah,” which he himself selected. Of course, Warners believe this will happen, but you can never be sure what Errol, who gets the wanderlust every so often, will really do.

— Tim

 

The Misadventure of William Tell — A Silent Film

30 Apr

— Tim

 
 
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