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Travelin’ to the End — September 24, 1956 and September 24, 1959

24 Sep

New York Times – September 24, 1956

PALMA, Mallorca, Sept. 23 (UP)–Errol Flynn, film actor, has undergone surgery of an undisclosed nature on the island of Ibiza. The reports said Mr. Flynn arrived Thursday at Ibiza, one of the Balearic islands in the western Mediterranean, aboard his yacht Zaca. His wife, the former Patricia Wymore, was with him.

Errol Arrives at Vancouver Airport – “September 24”, 1959

…with Miss Beverly Aadland

— Gentleman Tim

 

Juliette Greco dies aged 93

24 Sep

www.brecorder.com…

PARIS: Legendary French singer Juliette Greco has died aged 93 after a career spanning over half a century, her family told AFP.

“Juliette Greco died this Wednesday surrounded by her family in the house she loved so much. Her life was one like no other,” her family said in a statement.

“She was still making French songs shine at the age of 89” when her career was ended by a stroke, it added.

“I miss it terribly. My reason for living is to sing! To sing is everything, there is the body, the instinct, the head,” she told the Telerama magazine in an interview in July.

She also lost her only daughter, Laurence-Marie, in 2016, the same year as the stroke.

“It is a very great woman who has left us,” Alexandre Baud, the producer of her final tour in 2015, told AFP.

“Juliette had been tired for some time but she had kept her extremely sharp mind, as shown by her very open interview with Telerama,” he added.

President Emmanuel Macron offered a generous tribute to Greco, a leading cultural figure in radical chic post-war Paris, praising her “elegance” and saying that in death she took her place in the “Pantheon of French chanson.”

“Juliette Greco joins (Jacques) Brel, (Leo) Ferre, (Georges) Brassens, (Charles) Aznavour … in the Pantheon of French chanson. her face and her voice will continue to accompany our lives. The ‘muse of Saint-Germain-des-Pres’ (a well-heeled Parisian suburb) is immortal,” Macron tweeted.

Usually clad in stylish but sombre black, Greco had debuted as a young dancer at the Paris ballet school when the Nazis invaded France. She was arrested and her older sister and her mother — a member of the French Resistance — were both sent to a concentration camp but survived and were liberated.

The lover of both Hollywood studio boss Darryl F Zanuck and jazz legend Miles Davis, Greco interpreted texts by the likes of Sartre, poets Jacques Prevert and Jean Cocteau, playwright Bertolt Brecht and composers such as Leo Ferre, Guy Beart, Georges Brassens and Serge Gainsbourg.

Her best-loved hits “Jolie mome” (cute kid) by Ferre and Gainsbourg’s “La javanaise” were written for her.

She compared singing to sex, suggesting that “an audience is like a lover. You have to start slowly, softly, with a thousand caresses, tears and doubts… then give everything so that they love you.”

www.youtube.com…

— Claudia

 
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Errol Flynn Day 2015 — Featuring Rory

23 Sep

September 23. 2015

THE NEWS LEADER

THEATER

BRIDGEWATER— Bridgewater College presents Errol Flynn Day in a two-part discussion and film screening program at 3:30 and 7:30 p.m. Sept. 25. During the day at 3:30 p.m., Chad Trevitte shares his “Swashbuckling on Screen” discussion with the audience, followed by a screening of the film, “The Sea Hawk.” Starting at 7:30 p.m., Errol Flynn’s daughter, Rory Flynn, will be the evening’s guest speaker and share her program, “Stories of My Father,” followed by a screening of “Captain Blood.”

Charles Culbertson, director of media relations, and Stanley Galloway, professor of English and director of the film retrospective program, got together to bat around ideas for interesting guests. “Since I knew Rory Flynn,” says Culbertson, “I said, ‘Hey, how about Errol Flynn’s daughter and it kind of took off from there. I met her on- line several years ago. I was selling something on eBay related to her father and she bought it, and I emailed her to ask if she was Errol Flynn’s daughter and when she said yes, I said, ‘I’m not going to sell this to you. You can have it,’ and from that correspondence we just kept up via email. This will be the first time I will actually physically meet her so its exciting to meet the daughter of one of my childhood heroes.”

Rory Flynn prepared the program, “Memories of My Father” to keep her father’s memory alive. “The public Errol Flynn is very well known, but the public doesn’t know very much of him as a father — away from the cameras and the press,” says Culbertson. “He was famous not only as a movie star but as an adventurer, a ladies’ man. His exploits rivaled anything he did on the screen. What he’s not so much famous for is what he was like away from those movie cameras, away from the press, and those are some of things Rory will touch upon when she gives her presentation.” “From what I have read, he was highly intelligent and well read. He could talk on a huge variety of topics. And this was a man who was kicked out of every school he attended as a boy. He taught himself. He was charming and urbane, and he had that ability to charm the birds out of trees. At the same time, he was a man’s man — an adventurer, loved danger, loved sailing the world in his yacht; he sought adventure and experiences he never had — a true adventurer.”

According to Culbertson, this is what the real Errol Flynn was like and that is part of what her daughter will share during the film retrospective. “Flynn himself was such a fascinating character that I thought the human connection with him would be interesting to those people who do remember him, and also it would be a good introduction to our students about a man and an era of filmmaking,” Culbertson says.

This year also marks the 80th anniversary of “Captain Blood” which made Errol Flynn a star.

What:: Errol Flynn Day at Bridgewater College, Flynn’s daughter to be keynote speaker.

What: Errol Flynn Day

When; 3:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Sept. 25 3:30 p.m. Chad Trevitte’s “ Swashbuckling on Screen,” followed by “The Sea Hawk” 7:30 p.m. Rory Flynn’s “Stories of My Father,” followed by “Captain Blood”

Where: Cole Hall, Bridgewater College, Bridgewater Cost

Both events are free and open to the public.

More info www.bridgewater.edu…

PHOTO COURTESY OF CHARLES CULBERTSON. Errol Flynn (right) duels to the death with Basil Rathbone in the 1938 classic “The Adventures of Robin Hood.”

— Gentleman Tim

 

A Hamilton Quiz

19 Sep

What movie starring Errol includes a scene from a play about Alexander Hamilton?

Added Saturday, September 19 @ 11AM:

Glimpses of the the following Hollywood hotspots were also shown in this major black-and-white feature film.

Added Saturday, September 19 @ 7:30 PM:

A scene was filmed here:

— Gentleman Tim

 

Arno the Arnochist — Raising Hell at the Hotel Del

05 Sep

September 5, 1980 / May 1942

Errol Flynn’s Antic Stay at the Hotel Del Coronado

Excerpt from Esquire Magazine, May 1942. The Writings of Errol Flynn. “It Shouldn’t Happen to an Actor”

Friendship with Arno meant you were a cinch to lose most of your friends. There were times when the only answer seemed to be to change my name or leave the country. Like that time at the Coronado Hotel The Coronado Hotel is an austere establishment where rich old folks go to play until they die. The waitresses get off weekends to visit their grandchildren. You are kept awake nights by the dull thud of guests dropping dead.

Disaster, ever Arno’s sidekick, struck one day in the dining room of that hotel. Eating was always a problem because Arno insisted on eating with me. If you chased him out of the restaurant, he would just come in another door. When the door was shut he would wail for some customers and come in again camouflaged between their legs.

On this particular day I had (I thought) double-locked him in my room upstairs. One of the hotel’s younger set – a quaint little thing of about seventy – always complained that the dining room was cold, in spile of the temperature being a good eighty. She also maintained it was so dark she couldn’t see, though you could take snapshots in there at night and they would have been overexposed. So she announced she would provide her own lighting. Soon a tall stand-lamp arrived and was installed behind her chair. When lit the first night it was found to contain a 200-watt bulb of such brilliance that it temporarily blinded everyone who looked in her direction. The waitresses were the ones who suffered most They would serve her something and turn around to get something else, and everything would immediately go black. They would usually drop whatever they were holding. One of them partially solved the problem by wearing dark glasses. Of course nothing much could be done about the heating arrangements. From the heat generated by her lamp, people at adjoining tables already perspired freely throughout meals, but the frail little old lady sat serenely under her 200-watt umbrella and remarked how cold she was. She . finally achieved some measure of comfort by coming into meals wearing several silver fox furs. This was partly the cause of the trouble.

One night I was sitting in the dining room over a bottle of wine when a cat passed by the table. I knew this cat slightly. He was a prosperous executive-looking kind of cat and apparently had the exclusive use of the kitchen and dining room. Business was good with him. Suddenly there was a commotion at the dining room entrance. There was a scraping of chairs; the head waiters began moving around agitatedly. The hair on the back of the business cat shot up as though someone had got by the secretary he didn’t want to see.

It was Arno. How he got out of the room I don’t know. He had just started to give me a brief nod, a sort of double take, when he saw the cat. That was enough! They broke beautifully from the gate without a second’s difference in the start hugging the rail the cat skidded around several tables three lengths ahead of Arno. At the far turn, Arno had shortened and was coming up on the outside. Coming into the stretch it began to lode like a photo finish when the cat taking a desperate gamble, swerved sharply under the frail little old lady’s table. Arno, trailing by barely half a length now, saw dangling in front of him the fox fur and! It was horrible.

The screams of the waitresses, the hoarse shouts of the men, the smash of crockery, rose to a sudden deafening explosion as the 200-watt lamp crashed to the floor and broke shivering into a thousand pieces. Arno had the little old lady’s silver fox fur by the throat in a killer’s grip. On dark nights, the sounds still ring in my ears. All in all, the hotel was very nice about it After I had paid for the damage the management said I could come and stay there practically any time – alone.

Here’s Errol at the Hotel Del pool … sans Arno

— Gentleman Tim

 

A very ZACA looking ship, 1932 …

22 Aug

— David DeWitt

 

Island Cruise Quiz

16 Aug

Circa August 16, 1946, the Zaca was in the waters surrounding this island. What island is it?

Two new names came into the world and history of Errol because of Zaca’s trip to this island. What were those two names??

10PM EST – Clue No. 2 – A VERY BIG CLUE:

A Half Hour Past Midnight EST or so:

Monday, August 17, ~ 6PM EST:

Here’s a couple more Cruise Clues. Though physically very small, they are very big quiz clues – even bigger quiz-wise than the elephant seal and fur sea lion above:

Tuesday, August 18 – 10:30AM:

Wednesday – August 19 – ~ 3:10 AM:

The island is infamous for its huge and destructive goats. Here is an old photo of a couple:

— Gentleman Tim

 

“When you go home tell them of us and say,

15 Aug

for your tomorrow, we gave our today.”

Today is the 75th Anniversary of VJ Day and I’m watching it’s remembrance on the BBC.

These moving words were quoted in connection with the Burma Campaign (“a forgotten Army in a forgotten war”).

Well worth a visit to the Burma Star site (www.burmastar.org…) and finding out a bit more of the larger story behind a certain cinematic effort and of which “Errol Flynn described … as one of the roles that he was most proud of.”

— Karl

 
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Zaca Cruises into San Diego

14 Aug

August 13, 1946

After Setting Sail Out of Balboa:

The Zaca cruised into San Diego to load dredges, seines, dipnets, lobster traps, gill nets, microscope, aquariums, sorting trays, jars, preservatives, and smaller paraphenalia, collected by prominent Scripps Institute Professor Carl Hubbs for the scientific explorations and studies on what later became known as “Cruise of the Zaca” Errol’s arrival was met with “a flurry of reporters” and a “feminine hubbub on the dock as girls from nearby Navy offices came to beg autographs from their hero.” The athletic actor was limping that day, having somehow sprained his ankle aboard ship on the way down from Long Beach. Errol signed autographs with a flourish while Nora watched with amusement and Professor Flynn remarked on “the depths to which humanity will fall.”

The reporters had already had a field day, by discovering from Nora that she was expecting a child and so would require a doctor on the voyage.

Zaca was manned by a crew of ten and also carried an artist (John Decker), three above-and below-water photographers, Flynn’s manager, Errol and Nora, and Flynn’s father.

Thanks to Betty Shor for her superb account of the Zaca’s scientific expedition from which the above info has been extracted!

These are the downton docks in San Diego, the foot of Broadway, circa the time of Zaca’s arrival. Lane Field (Home of the PCL Padres) is on the right and the Pacific Fleet’s Navy Supply Center (where the flock of Navy girls likely came from) is on the left.

— Gentleman Tim

 

The Most Thrilled Girl in Hollywood

11 Aug

August 11, 1936

Louela O. Parsons
Los Angeles Times

Sally Eilers is the most thrilled girl in Hollywood over winning the women’s doubles title with Josephine Cruikshank in the West Side Tennis Club’s first annual tournament; club members, headed by Errol Flynn, Frank Shields and Michael Bartlett, campaigning for less eccentric court attire. We’re with them 100 percent as long as they don’t bar Nigel “Willie” Bruce’s battered felt hat and John Cromwell’s pipe.

Here’s sexy silent and early talkies star, Sally Eilers. Her first husband was Hoot Gibson , who can be seen having a hoot in this Dodge City Premier photo featuring Errol. Her second husband was Harry Joe Brown, who produced both Captain Blood and Son of Captain Blood. In fact, Harry Joe Brown may have been the prime person responsible for Jack Warner’s selection of Errol as Captain Blood.

And here is the 1934 U. S. Tennis Team – Caroline Babcock, Alice Marble, Josephine Cruikshank, and Sarah Palfrey – as they boarded the steamship Bremen to return to the U.S. after defeating the United Kingdom team at Wimbledon. Josephine Cruikshank is third from the left. Alice Marble, another tennis friend of Errol’s (who won 18 Grand Slam Championships!) is second from the left.

Josephine Cruikshank a regular at the Los Angeles Tennis Club where the Pacific Southwest Championships as well as the Motion Picture tournaments were played. Other players at the club included Mickey Rooney, Rudy Vallee, Ozzie Nelson, Sam Yorty and Bing Crosby. Errol asked Josephine to be his partner in the Motion Picture championship final in 1937.

— Gentleman Tim