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Archive for October, 2020

The Ghost of Mulholland — The Specter of Errol — — Was it Real? Who was It?

31 Oct

Happy Errolween. October 31, 2020. Don’t be afraid of no ghosts.

The Ghost of Mulholland

Many if not most residents of and visitors to Mulholland Farm after Errol’s death claim that the home and estate was haunted. Some, like Ricky Nelson, believed it was Errol himself. Ricky’s daughter, Tracy, believed it was haunted by an angry woman. Others reported to have experienced a ghost of an identity unknown to them. Perhaps there were multiple ghosts? Or, perhaps there were none at all.

What do you believe?

The excellent video below provides a brief history of Mulholland Farm, asserting unequivocally, beginning at 6:57, that there was a ghost.

The Specter of Errol?

Below the video is a link to a former EFB post, titled After Party Ghost List, addressing the possibilities of ghosts at Mulholland, on the Zaca, and elsewhere.

After Party Ghost List

— Gentleman Tim

 

October 30, 1600

30 Oct

Bessie Berates Essex


“An unruly horse must be abated of his provender, that he may be the easier and better managed.”

Queen Elizabeth I, October 30, 1600

— Gentleman Tim

 

DeMarrying Mr. MacEvoy

29 Oct

Prologue

~ “In 1940, Freddie MacEvoy married Beatrice Cartwright, an heiress to the Standard Oil fortune. He and Beatrice (twice his age) had lived together at the Badrutt Palace in St. Moritz for several winters, prior to their marriage. One year, McEvoy brought a much younger model to “care for him,” explaining to Cartwright that he must have a younger lover than her. The marriage lasted two years, and in the same year they were divorced, he married Irene Wrightsman, the 18-year-old daughter of the president of Standard Oil of Kansas.”

October 29, 1942

The Daily News (Perth, Australia)

Here’s the Wiley Mr. MacEvoy with Buster Wiles, three months later…

Postscript

Four years later…

August 29, 1946

The Daily News (New York, New York)

~ “During the Forties, Freddie often stayed in Mexico City with Countess Dorothy di Frasso, one of Freddie’s most generous patrons. Di Frasso spread his fame among her friends for his bedroom performances, which she said was worth all the money she gave him.

In 1945, McEvoy began a long-running affair with the wealthy heiress, Barbara Hutton. Hutton agreed with di Frasso concerning Freddie’s skills, considering him a superb lover, and felt that he understood women better than any man she had ever met. They later lived together at a fashionable ski chalet in Franconia, New Hampshire, which Hutton bought for McEvoy. They never married but remained friends throughout his life.

McEvoy eventually married French fashion model Claude Stephanie Filatre. On November 7, 1951 they were sailing on his 104-ton schooner, Kangaroo, near Cap Cantin off the coast of Morocco when a storm hit. The ship went down, but Freddie lashed his wife and maid to the mast, and then swam to shore seeking help. But he was unable to find any assistance and swam back out to the mast. He and Claude Stephanie then began swimming to shore, but she was unable to make it. He attempted to tow her to shore, but the waves pulled them to sea, they crashed against the rocks, and were not seen alive again. Their bodies were recovered the next day.


Earlier in ’51, Vincent Van Spartacus was making a play for Irene…


— Gentleman Tim

 

Oh Boy! Quiz

28 Oct

End of October, 1935:
“Errol Flynn and ______ _______ are both being
considered for the leads in The Sea Hawk.”

He was in three Hollywood films with Errol.

Oh Boy!

— Gentleman Tim

 

Born 110 Years Ago Today

28 Oct

The Great Jack Carson: Born October 27, 1910 in Manitoba, Canada

— Gentleman Tim

 

Errol Flynn, The Last Romantic Hero!

27 Oct

Thanks to Karl Holmberg …

— David DeWitt

 

Dinner and a Movie — At the Waldorf and Warners

26 Oct

October 25, 1939

A large dinner was given last night by Miss Elsa Maxwell in the Perroquet Suite of the Waldorf Astoria. Afterward the party attended a private preview of the new motion picture “Elizabeth and Essex,” with Bette Davis and Errol Flynn, at the Warner Brothers Building in West Forty-fourth Street.


Elsa Maxwell – “The Greatest Celebrity of All Time”

ALFRED DUFF-COOPER was 1st Viscount Norwich GCMG, DSO, PC (22 February 1890 – 1 January 1954), known as Duff Cooper, was a British Conservative Party politician, diplomat and author. In 1937 he was 1st lord of the admiralty and regularly appearing as one of the 3 worst warmongers’ in Nazi propaganda. He spoke in the United States during the late 30’s seeking to secure its entry into World War II. Like his (in)famous wife, “Darling Monster” Diana, he was quite an outspoken and often controversial character.

LADY DIANA COOPER was born into one of the richest and most socially prominent families in England, the daughter of a duke. Acclaimed “the most beautiful girl in the world”, “the only really glamorous woman in the world”, “the most celebrated debutante of her era”, and an actress of note, she was internationally renowned. In 1939, she met Errol in California and disliked him for, in her view, not being a proper loyal colonist and sufficiently supporting the Crown, not enough to spill oceans of American, Australian, English, or Irish, blood in Europe. Here they are at the Santa Anita Ball. Errol looks friendly; she does not. (Nor does it look to me like she was ever truly “the most beautiful woman in the world”.)

The Waldorf-Astoria


The Parraquet Suite

The former Warners by the Hudson

— Gentleman Tim

 

Tribute to T. T. Flynn, Ph.D.

24 Oct

October 11, 1883 – October 24, 1968

Tasmania’s First Professor of Biology

www.utas.edu…

Thank you very much to Philip for his previous posting of the audio above on the EFB.

— Gentleman Tim

 

Centennial Tribute to Maureen O’Hara

24 Oct

Maureen O’Hara: August 17, 1920 – October 24, 2015

Queen of Technicolor – Queen of Swashbucklers

“Never did I see a more dreamlike creature. That flaming red hair, glorious Irish complexion, and beautiful bearing,” said Errol.

— Gentleman Tim

 

Married in Monte Carlo

23 Oct

October 23, 1950

And the Best Man was…

— Gentleman Tim