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Archive for the ‘Travels’ Category

Flyin’ Like Flynns

02 Jun

Three weeks after the world premier of The Adventures of Robin Hood on May 14, 1938, Errol and Lili fly on Western Air Express.

Photo published in the Los Angeles Herald Examiner on June 2, 1938.

— Gentleman Tim

 

Tributes to the Troops

31 May

Memorial Day, 2021

Because of poor health, Errol’s multiple attempts to serve in uniform were not accepted by the Armed Forces, so he supported America and the Allies in numerous other ways, beginning with his anti-Nazi tour of South America, his numerous appearances for the Red Cross and on war bond tours, and his anti-Axis war films – from Sea Hawk to Objective Burma.

Errol also supported the troops and Allies very significantly as a star on USO tours, including north to Alaska in WWII, and west to Korea during the Korean War.

North to Alaska, 1943

West to Korea, 1953

— Gentleman Tim

 

An A to Z List of Potential Libations for the 2021 Global Toast to Errol 🍸🍺🍹🍮🥃🍾

29 May

Based on drinks and beverages Errol is known to have drank, believed to have drank, likely drank, rumored to have drank, and has had created and named in tribute to him, here is an A through Z list of possible libations for the June 20, 2021 Global Birthday Toast to Errol<a

Almost 21 days away

First Announcement of the 2021 Global Birthday Toast to Errol

Absinthe – in Europe and New Orleans

Bacardi – in Cuba and elsewhere

Bavarian Beer – in Germany

Bloody Mary – the drink he introduced at the Smokehouse in LA

Bourbon – during Desperate Journey (the movie, not the marriage to Lili)

Brandy and Soda – a favored drink in New Guinea during his days there

British Beers from his days in Britain and at the Cock'n Bull in LA

Bundaberg Beer – in Australia and New Guinea

Bundy (Bundaberg Rum) – in Australia and New Guinea

Captain's Blood – a daiquiri created in tribute to Errol

Cascade Brewery Beer – from Tasmania, per tassiedevil (Steve & Genene)

Champagne – throughout his celebrity years, and a la Olivia's annual birthday toast to Errol

Chianti – drank at various locations and occasions

Coca-Cola

Coffee – throughout adulthood

Courvoisier cognac – during years of celebrity

Cuba Libre – from his first visits to Cuba in the mid-Thirties

Cuba Story – a drink created for Errol by Dennis Mullen

Daiquiri – during his visits to Havana, a la El Floridita

Dry Martini – throughout years of celebrity

Errol Flynn's Pick-Me-Up – a drink named after him

Fine French Wines – brought with him to locations without, per Difford's Guide for Discriminating Drinkers

Gin, bathtub-style – a la Errol at the Roosevelt Hotel

Gin – in many drinks, with mixes from tonic to O.J., sometimes with a splash of Squirt

Guinness Stout – in Britain and Ireland and elsewhere

Hennessy Cognac – a likely Flynn cognac

Herradura – the tequila owned by his friend Bing Crosby

Italian Wines – during his days in Italy and filming of William Tell (with sardines), et al

Irish Beers – from his days in Ireland and Britain

Irish whiskeys

Jack Rose – at the 21 Club (and maybe the Mocombo)

Jamaican Reef – created for Errol Dennis Mullen

Johnnie Walker – per Difford's Guide for Discriminating Drinkers

Kentucky whiskey – straight, in a Mint Julep, or in a Kentucky Coffee

Louis XIII Cognac – a possible Flynn cognac

Maid Marian – created and bottled by Chesterfield Whisky

Mai Tai – see the "Q.B. Cooler" below

Mojito – a la Bodeguita del Medio

Moselle – a la 21 Club

Moscow Mule – a la the Cock 'n Bull in LA

Napolean Cognac – a likely Flynn cognac

Navy Grog – in tribute to Errol's In the Wake of the Bounty

Old Fashioned – a likely cocktail for Errol throughout adulthood

Pi Yi – a la Don the Beachcomber, LA

Q.B. Cooler – predecessor of the Mai Tai, created by tiki-drink pioneer, Donn Beach

Queen Elizabeth

Queen’s Pineapple Punch – a la Don the Beachcomber’s, LA

Remy Martin

Robin Hood cocktail

Rum and Coca-Cola – a la Caribbean, California and Courmayeur, et al

Sangria – a la Errol’s days in Spain

Sangro de Cristo

Sazerac – a la New Orleans

Scotch

Tasmanian Devil

Tea – throughout his life, sometimes with orange blossom honey

Tequilas – during his days in Mexico

The Errol Flynn – created by Errol, resurrected a la Petronella Wyatt

The Martini Special – a la Fabio Delgado Fuentes

The Tasmanian – a la Dennis Mullen

The Vancouver – a la Sylvia Hotel, Vancouver

U.S. Bar Beers – a la Boardner’s in LA and many other locations in. U.S.

Various Vodkas – straight, with tonic, with O.J., inter alia

Vicious Virgin – a la Don the Beachcomber

Veuve Clicquot

Vodka with Red Pepper – a la The Hotel Savoy’s American Bar in London

Water – both sparkling and natural

Whiskey Sour – a likely for Errol throughout adulthood

XXXX Gold beer- from Queensland and Tasmania

York Gin – Old Tom and Outlaw

Zombie – a la Don the Beachcomber

Zubrowka Polish Vodka

— Gentleman Tim

 

Fists, Bottles and Chairs

16 May

May 17, 1938
Los Angeles Examiner

ERROL FLYNN AIDS AMERICAN IN FIGHT

Havana, May 17. Errol Flynn, Hollywood film actor, received the thanks today of an unidentified American he saved from serious injury during a fight in a night club here last night.

Fists, bottles and chairs were flying when Flynn intervened. The American who was involved escaped with a broken nose. Flynn was not hurt.

He was accompanied by his wife, who refused to take the matter seriously.

May 17, 1938
Evening Herald Express

ERROL FLYNN, FRIENDS IN HAVANA CAFE FIGHT

“I think this all so funny”, quoth Lili Damita, stage and screen beauty, who was a spectator while fists and bottles flew in a free-for-all-fight at the Eden Concert Night Club with Errol Flynn taking a prominent part in the fighting.

The fight started last night when one of the members of Flynn’s party got into an argument with a man at a nearby table. A minute later, chairs and bottles began to fly.

Flynn, who often plays rough and tumble parts in the movies, joined in with two or three effective punches at those who got in his way. The only casualty was an unidentified American who received a broken nose and a cut eye. Flynn and the others were unhurt and continued their party.

The Eden Concert Night Club was regarded as one of the world’s most “spectacular” and “phenomenally popular” night clubs in the world. Located in the center of town between Sloppy Joe’s and the Hotel Plaza, it evolved in 1939 into the also world-renowned Tropicana Club.

— Gentleman Tim

 

One, Two, Three – Kick!

15 May

“Beginning in the late 1930s and booming in the 1940s, conga dancing became wildly popular in the US.” Errol occasionally joined in the Congamania – in Cuba, in Hollywood, and in New York. Here is some evidence, beginning with a news report of a wire from Cuba, where Errol had just been, or was very soon to be, involved in a “free-for-all” Dodge City-like fracas at a famous nightclub in Havana, details of which I will post tomorrow.

May 16, 1938

Harrison Carroll
Evening Herald Express ba

Errol Flynn has wired for reservations at La Conga for the night of May 21.

The La Conga in Hollywood


Errol was still kicking more than a year later. Here he is sitting with his sister Rosemary (and Randy Burke) and in a conga line led by Desi Arnaz on tumbadora at the La Conga in Manhattan, on August 5, 1939:



La Conga, Manhattan

The conga craze continued in Hollywood (and around the world) into the Forties. Here’s Desi Arnaz leading a huge line in Too Many Girls (1940) during which he and Lucy fell in love, leading to groundbreaking television history, in the form of I Love Lucy and Desilu Productions, etc. Look for Lucy near the end of this wildly fun conga clip.

— Gentleman Tim

 

CROCODILE!

12 May

May 13, 1936

Evening Herald Examiner

He-Men of Filmdom Tell “Worst Fears”

Can you imagine those big “he-men” of the screen – Errol Flynn, Clsrk Gable, George Brent, and Victor McLaglen – having the jitters from fright.

Flynn’s great scare came six years ago in New Guinea when he was prospecting for gold. In the middle of a wide stream his raft fell to pieces. He and six natives started swimming for shore, when Flynn felt something bump his knee.

“Alligator!” cried one of the natives, and immediately disappeared with a blood-curdling scream. Flynn and the rest made the shore safely, but Flynn had to examiner his hair to examiner his hair in the mirror to convince himself it hasn’t turned wjite.


— Gentleman Tim

 

Alice in Wondrousland

11 May

Errol Flynn crowns Alice Moore, La Cuesta Queen at Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff: June 1, 1940

— Gentleman Tim

 

Location Location Location

11 May

May 11, 1940
The Weekly Wireless

THE HIGH COST OF GRASSHOPPERS

Miriam Hopkins in three moods -demure, gay and grim. The swash buckler is, as you probably guessed, none other than Errol Flynn.

The appearance of a grasshopper in the leading
lady’s bed may wreck a million-dollar movie. That’s why location-man hates arranging locations, especially for films such as
Warner’s spectacular “Virginia City,” made at Flagstaff, with Miriam Hopkins and Errol Flynn.

The stars, director Michael Curtiz, and about a hundred others spent six weeks on the famed
Painted Desert.

Only those who have been on “location” trips can have any idea of the headaches involved. Joe Barry, who handled the “Virginia City” job, estimated the expense og the trip at approximately £20,000, over and above regular salaries and production costs.

But money was the least of his worries. A location invariably offers unexpected problems, which may vary from finding lost children to the discovery of a grasshopper in the leading lady’s bed.

He can figure almost exactly the cost of train fare and freight. He can allow £2OOO, more or less, for food for the company, and not be far wrong.

Even if Miss Hopkins had insisted on strawberries for breakfast, or if Mr. Flynn had called for a special kind of beef to keep up his flagging strength, the final totals would not have been changed much. But there are other expenses which cannot be budgeted so closely. There are the items of rent and feed for horses needed, in addition to those taken from Hollywood, accommodation and food for drivers of trucks and buses from the studio and those hired “on the ground.”

Flagstaff, where the company had to stay, is a small town of 4000 inhabitants, with three small hotels and a limited number of restaurants.
The problem of assigning living quarters and eating places was no small one, and arrangements for doctors, nurses, dentists, barbers, laundries, and filling stations had to be made.
Dry-cleaning alone presents a problem in a small community. Even though he allowed £3OO for that
item, he had to be sure that the local cleaners could give him the overnight service he needed.
He had to get local people to serve as extras, and this invariably led to hard feelings on the part of those he did not employ.

A location-man must, if possible, re-route any regular plane service over the location. Railroad whistles have to be suppressed.. Officials of all kinds must be met, wheedled, placated, and side-tracked. Sometimes fences had to be removed, and replaced later,and roads had to be covered up. (“Virginia City” starts in American Civil War times, so that motor cars and their tracks must be kept well out of sight.)

Irate neighbors in the vicinity who had not been employed by the company chopped wood and beat
on tubs, to the dismay of the sound men, until Joe appeased them.

Fire hazards had to be watched, dry creeks to be flushed with water dragged miles in tanks, a telephone from the company headquarters to the home studio had to be kept open continuously.

On any location at night there are standing-room-only signs before the theatres and cafes. Ice cream is at a premium. The studio had to
put up a big bond that no liquor will be allowed on the Indian reservation near the “Virginia City” camp.

Joe brought the “Virginia City” location back to Hollywood according to budget. But he lost weight doing it. He always does.

ERROL’S LETTER ABOUT THE LOCATION



DICKIE JONES’S MEMORIES OF ERROL AND FLAGSTAFF

Did you stay in Flagstaff while filming Virginia City?

DICK JONES: Oh yeah, I remember it real well. I just about ate myself to death with trout. I loved it. I actually came back to Flagstaff later that year to do The Outlaw.

What can you tell us about the personal appearance you made at Flagstaff’s Orpheum Theater while filming here?

I don’t remember it at all. I probably did a trick roping act, because that was the only thing I knew. (Laughing) I could strum a ukulele but that wouldn’t have been much!

Do you have memories of working with Errol Flynn in Virginia City?

The one thing I can remember was that he had this standard-sized schnauzer. He had that dog trained. [Flynn] had this swagger stick and he’d be slapping his boot with it, then he’d stop to talk to somebody and he’d slap them on their boot with that swagger stick. Then when he walked away the dog would come up and lift its leg up on them. I think [co-star] “Big Boy” Williams almost wanted to kill him!

I really enjoyed working with Errol Flynn. I worked with him again on Rocky Mountain (1950); that was my favorite of all the films I ever made. [Flynn] was one of the best journeyman actors. He knew his trade and worked his craft real well.

— Gentleman Tim

 

Errol Declares His Intentions

09 May

On May 9, 1936, Errol filed his Declaration of Intention to become an American Citizen. He did so at the Calexico border.

A Declaration of Intention is the formal act of a foreigner declaring that it is his or her bona fide intention to become a citizen of the United States, and to renounce forever all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty, whereof he may at the time be a citizen or subject.

When Errol came to Hollywood, before the visas expired, studio stars who were foreign citizens would sometimes leave and return to the U.S. via Mexico. This is what Errol did, as evidenced by his Declaration of Intention.

Errol became a naturalized American citizen on August 14, 1942.

— Gentleman Tim

 

London: May 6, 1958

07 May

Errol and Beverly at the Lido Club

— Gentleman Tim

 
 
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