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Archive for the ‘Travels’ Category

Errol NOT Killed in Spain — But Wounds to Reputation Near Fatal!

05 Apr

Only “slightly wounded” by falling plaster. However, his heroic reputation suffers severe, long-lasting, near-fatal wounds due to fraudulently-false, self-serving reports of Errol’s death by publicity-seeking, back-stabbing, fascist-colloaborating-pawn and psycho-quack-physician, Hermann Erben. As a publicity Erben was the first to report that Errol was killed, which he knew not to be true.

International Publication of Erben’s Fraudulent Report that Errol was Killed at the University City Front:

Los Angeles Evening Herald Express – April 5, 1937

LILI DAMITA MAY FLY TO WOUNDED ERROL FLYNN

All Lili Damita is sure of today is that she must get post-haste to the side
of her wounded husband, Errol Flynn — by airplane if possible.

After a night of frantic worry over the fate of the handsome actor-adventurer
as the result of an alarmist telephone call from a London friend saying Flynn
had been killed near Madrid, Miss Damita planned to ask the foreign office for
a special permit to fly to Spain.

The actress poured out her thanks in a torrent of emotional words when she was
informed that latest information said that Flynn had been only slightly wounded
and had left Madrid for Valencia.

(Madrid advisers said Flynn was grazed on the head by a machine gun bullet
when he was visiting the University City front.)

In the meantime Miss Damita made frantic efforts to get in touch with Flynn,
planning to defer her departure until she gets direct word from her husband.

Her only worry as she prepared from Leeds Castle in Kent to the foreign office
here was whether the reported injury to Flynn’s handsome Irish face will mar his
film career.

“Lili Frantically Worried About Errol’s Handsome Irish Face”

— Gentleman Tim

 

Errol Flynn is Killed in Spain*

05 Apr

By Machine Gun Bullets on the Guadalajara Front

New York Daily News: April 5, 1937

* Rumors of his death may have been exaggerated. Initial report of Errol’s death was disseminated by “eye-witness” Hermann Erben.

— Gentleman Tim

 

Film Stars Invade Dodge

01 Apr

April 1, 1939

From the Depot to the Rodeo to the Theaters

— Gentleman Tim

 

The Warner Bros. Dodge City World Premier Special ==== “A Hollywood Parade on Wheels”

01 Apr

STARS GET WELCOMED FOR FILM PREVIEW

Evening Herald Express

By Jimmy Starr

Dodge City, Kan. April 1 (1939)

For years they have been saying that Hollywood is colossal, but it took the Warner Brothers’ 14-car special train which arrived in Dodge City this morning to prove that moviedom was never colossal until today.

With no strings on a bank account, the party, which includes 35 stellar names, 72 newspapermen and magazine correspondents and cameramen and dozens of studio technicians departed Thursday night from Santa Fe station in Los Angeles and arrived in Dodge City this morning.

A typical Hollywood gathering of several thousand persons were at the station to greet the stars. Radios and loud speakers blared gala tunes. Dozens of luminaries were ushered through wildly gesticulating crowds.

The baggage car of the special train was transformed into a replica of the famous “Gay Lady Saloon” of Dodge City’s wildest and wooliest days, and it was visited by thousands of Dodge City fans.

OLD WEST ATMOSPHERE

The Warner studio had given it an Old West atmosphere with sawdust on the floor, typical signs warning customers against crooked faro dealers and advice to check shooting irons with the bartender. All it needed to complete the picture was a dirty old villain to shoot it up and a tree to hang him on.

Then there was a palace car, but it was not for for the human stars of Hollywood. Instead it housed 16 equine stars to be used in an especially staged rodeo in Dodge City this afternoon as a warm-up for the triple preview of the 2-million dollar Technicolor picture Dodge City tonight. In order to accommodate the terrific influx of visitors from four states it was necessary to engage three theaters, which will run all night, to show the production to the tremendously swollen population.

150,000 THERE

Dodge City, which has a normal population of 13,000 persons, is today entertaining a swarming multitude of 150,000 yelling, restless, staring, snoopy, autograph-hunting, curious, hungry, thirsty, dusty, foot-weary and movie-mad spectators. As a tribute to Jack Warner and the picture, Dodge City citizens took it upon themselves to emulate the founders of their rough and ready village by growing enough bushy beards that not only would frighten Boris Karloff, but also would supply a thousand baseball teams for the House of David. It was indeed a sight to turn a mattress factory green with envy.

ODDITIES BETWEEN WHISTLESTOPS

Olivia de Havilland, heroine of the picture, was the heartbroken ingenue of the train when she was rudely and without warning snatched from the special at Pasadena.

It seems that Mr. Selznick, who stalled for two years before making Gone with the Wind, is now in a big hurry. It also happens that Miss de Havilland is playing Melanie in Mr. Selznick’s picture and there was rumor that her presence would be needed. Olivia jumped up and down, stamped her feet, yelled and carried on. But she isn’t on the train anymore. Poor Melanie.

SCHOOLS LET OUT

Unusual fascination for such a stellar caravan caused city officials of three cities to declare a school holiday so that Young America could see and hear some of its celluloid heroes and heroines. Fifteen-minute stops were made in Flagstaff, Ariz.; Gallup, N.M.; and Albuquerque, N.M. Indians, Mexicans, hermits, prospectors and ranchers with their families came afoot, on horseback, in rickety buggies and chugging jalopies to join the townsfolk in their amazing display of admiration for Hollywood’s parade on wheels.

— Gentleman Tim

 

The Mostly True Story and “Adventuring Career” of Errol Flynn

29 Mar

March 30, 1938

Sidney Skolsky

TINTYPES
Hollywood Citizen News

(All Photos Added)

Errol Flynn is an actor who always tries to act his role, that of a handsome man dashing around in search of adventure. He was that kind of actor before he ever looked at a camera, and he would be that kind of an actor had he never got into the movies.

He is a skilled boxer. He was England’s representative in the 1928 Olympic Games at Amsterdam.

He has an ugly scar on his ankle, the result of being hit by a poisoned arrow by natives in the bush country of New Guinea.

He went to Spain to take a look at the fighting and he wrote an adventure book, “Beam Ends,” which was banned in Germany because it contained too much levity.

The movies aided him with his “adventuring career.” An English film company produced Mutiny on the Bounty, and cast him as Fletcher Christian. The company went to Tahiti for the location shots, and after the picture was finished, he stayed on. He bought a boat and hired a crew and went into the pearl fishing business.

Then he got restless and went prospecting for gold in New Guinea. With the money he made, he bought a schooner and went into the inter-island freight service. Then he just kept on adventuring around. Why, he just kept on, sounding like a scenario.

He even had an adventure while on the boat on his way to Hollywood. He met Lili Damita.

He danced with her, thought she was lovely, enjoyed himself, and didn’t think about it until after they kept seeing each other in Hollywood. Then, in his customary dashing style, he boarded a plane with Lili, flew to Yuma, and married her.

He calls her Damita. She calls him Flynn.

He was born June 20, 1909, in the north of Ireland. He went to school at the Lycee Louis Grand, in Paris, and at St. Paul’s in London. He claims he is a direct descendant of Fletcher Christian, who led the mutiny on the Bounty.

He is 6 feet 2 inches tall, weighs 180 pounds, has brown hair, and is an excellent cook.

On the set he wanders about and seem to behaving a good time. He appears to enjoy his work, as if it were another adventure for him. He reads his script over at home, and then tries to learn a scene the night before he is to play it. He will often rehearse a love scene on the set, reading over the dialogue with the script girl.

He often takes his dog, Arno, on the set with him. He’ll park the dog in his portable dressing room, and the dog knows enough about picture making not to bark. It is the only dog allowed to enter the Warner commissary.

His pet aversion is to be hurried by people. He also hates alarm clocks. A valet wakes him every morning.

Recently, his valet quit him to become a picture actor. He didn’t see the valet again until one day on the set of Four’s a Crowd. He was playing the role of Flynn’s valet.

He likes to write. Besides several books he has written a play, “White Rajah,” which the Warners are supposed to make into a movie. He also wrote articles for a fan magazine. He reads newspaper editorials earnestly, and then writes “letters to the editor,” giving his views on various subjects. He sings to himself as he writes.


He resides in a modest house in Beverly Hills. There is one room in the house, his den, which even his wife can’t enter without his permission.

His favorite outdoor diversion is sailing. He is now getting ready to cruise on his new yacht, Sirocco. He also swims, rides, and plays tennis. He is considered one of the best tennis players in the movie colony.

Sleep annoys him. He doesen’t believe in more than six hours sleep, and likes to get up while he’s still tired. He believes that sleep should be taken sparingly and that indulging in it is like indulging in any other vice, such as drinking or smoking. When he sleeps a great deal he feels sluggardly all day. He resents the idea of devoting too much time to sleep.

When he does sleep, he sleeps with the windows open, and without a pillow, which he believes ruins one’s posture. He sleeps in an old-fashioned, four-poster bed. He always sleeps alone. Damita sleeps in another room.

He doesn’t own a pair of pajamas or a nightgown. He sleeps in the raw. Occasionally, he dreams. And the dream is usually about some thrilling, bold adventure, modeled after a scenario.

— Gentleman Tim

 

A Plea of Urgency

29 Mar

March 30, 1937

Elizabeth Yeaman
Hollywood Citizen News

The Warner Brothers are sincerely worried over their failure to locate Errol Flynn, who was hastily summoned back to Hollywood when it was learned he was planning to penetrate war-torn Spain. Errol was in Paris, and last week he told his wife, Lili Damita, he was leaving for Spain. He left, while Lili remained in Paris. He didn’t tell her where he was going in Spain, and apparently Lili didn’t bother to inquire. Robert Schless, head of Warner Paris office, has not been able to locate him.

Errol, when he left, was determined to do some war corresponding in Spain. He started to make arrangements with the United States for some special articles, but the studio jumped in and soured the deal. Errol threatened that he would make arrangements with an English syndicate.This he may have done.

Warners cabled him to be back by April 15, to start The Perfect Specimen. I doubt if they actually had a picture ready for him, but hoped to get him back on a plea of urgency. Miriam Hopkins has been announced for the co-starring spot in The Perfect Specimen, but that announcement is quite premature, for she has not been signed for the role.

— Gentleman Tim

 

Captain Blood on the Saddle

28 Mar

March 27, 1939

Evening Herald Express

Errol Flynn will bounce along in a $25,000 silver saddle for the rodeo at Dodge City. The history of the Santa Fe Trail is engraved on it.

Dodge City’s First Rodeo

“A mile long parade featured the actors and elected officials, including the governors of Kansas, Colorado and New Mexico. This was followed by a rodeo” at McCarty Stadium. Though there was not enough time to stage a full-fledged rodeo, the event inspired Dodge City to have its first real rodeo, the Boot Hill Roundup, later that year. This event has evolved into today’s PRCA’s Dodge City Day’s Roundup Rodeo.

For Those Who Want to be Dressin’ Like Flynn in a Long-Haired Beaver, Frontier Fur Felt Cowboy Hat!

— Gentleman Tim

 

Honeymoon, Yes — Marriage, No

27 Mar

www.todayifoundout.com…

Honeymoon Over Miami Way

March 28, 1938

Jimmy Starr

Although maritime laws permit a captain to perform a perfectly legal marriage ceremony, it isn’t as easy as it might sound. There are certain official papers that a seaworthy captain must have.

Of course, Errol Flynn is the captain of his yacht, but that doesn’t alone give him the right to tie the holy bonds of matrimony, as he was informed by local maritime officials.

And that revelation somewhat changes the marital plans of Gertrude Hemmer and Ralph Cobley, Miami friends of Errol’s, who planned to have the Warner star perform the wedding ceremony for them aboard his new yacht, which stops over at the southern city en route to Hollywood. The couple will be married on shore and will spend a brief honeymoon aboard Flynn’s boat.

Miami Beach 1938

Miami 1938

— Gentleman Tim

 

The Train to Spain ====== Mainly on the Plain

26 Mar


“Beautiful spring day, warm sunshine, country beautiful. How can people fight a war in this lovely weather? Four hours train journey from here the most savage cruel patricidal war is being waged.”
First entry in Errol’s Spanish Civil War Diary- March 26, 1937 (83 years ago today)

===

Excerpts from Robin de los Bosques in the Spanish War

See, also: Lincoln Douglas Hurst: The True Adventures of a Real-Life Rogue

“In 1935, Flynn married French-American actress Lili Damita (divorcing in 1942), with whom he had a very stormy relationship, with frequent physical fights. They were called the “Fighting Flynns,” and he called his wife “Tiger Lili.” When his friend Dr. Herman F. Erben Read the rest of this entry »

— Gentleman Tim

 

Dodging Dodge City? — OR Dreading Bette D?

22 Mar

March 20, 1939

Louella O. Parsons
Los Angeles Examiner

If Errol Flynn fails to show up for his preview, Bob Taplinger is going to lose some money. Errol’s trusting P.A. is betting that he will be there, but knowing the Flynn temperament I wouldn’t want to do any wagering myself. Errol doesn’t have to be back in Hollywood until May, when he plays Essex to Bette Davis’ Elizabeth.
Another change in the schedule has put The Knight and the LadyThe Miracle. You’ll see Claude Rains as Bacon, poet laureate of the Elizabethan era. It will all be in Technicolor. Bette’s first. This Queen Elizabeth is based on Robert Sherwood’s “Elizabeth the Queen”.

— Gentleman Tim