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Archive for August, 2020

What the Picture Did for Me

07 Aug

August 7, 1937

MPH

What the Picture Did for Me

The Green Light
, Errol Flynn, Anita Louise – Just a natural for any spot. This was thoroughly enjoyed by all. Too bad we could not get more productions like this. Good cast and excellent story. Running time: nine reels. July 15 – A. L. Dove, Bengough Theatre, Bengough, Saskatchewan, Can. Rural and Small Town Patronage.

Bengough, with a population of about 337, is known as the “Gateway to the Big Muddy (Valley and Badlands)”. Before Errol was seen by the populace in and around Bengough, the gentlemen in the photo below used to show up in the area to escape U.S. legal authorities. Their names were Butch and Sundance.



The Prince and the Pauper
: Big time stuff in any man’s town. Box office all the way. Running time, 115 minutes – W. E. McPhee, Strand Theater, Old Town, Maine. General Patronage.

The new Strand in Old Town featured Bing Crosby in Rhythm on the Range in 1936, the year it was upgraded to better accomodatethe old Strand to better accommodate the town of Old Town, with its mid-1930s population of approximately 7500.

— Gentleman Tim

 

A Field Day for Flynn

06 Aug

August 6, 1953

H.H.T.
New York Times
Master of Ballantrae at the Paramount

With plenty of good, old-fashioned muscularity crowding a highly pictorial Technicolor frame, at least three-fourths of “The Master of Ballantrae” makes a rousing, spectacular outlet for a pair of estimable adventurers, Errol Flynn and the master himself, Robert Louis Stevenson. In the new Warner Brothers arrival at the Paramount yesterday, Mr. Flynn is leading a fine, predominantly British cast through one of the liveliest, handsomest and most absurd screen free-for alls ever to leave the Victorian talespinner’s pen. If the excessive length and staggeringly heroic exploits can be pinned on Warners and Mr. Stevenson, respectively, no one, assuredly, should question the lavish elasticity of the proceedings. It is played well by the entire cast, and seasoned throughout with some brazen drollery. The film was gleamingly authenticized in such locales as Scotland, England and Sicily. Herb Meadow’s adaptation fittingly charts a cluttered, tumultuous odyssey for the indefatigable protagonist, leader of the fiery Durisdeer clan and fugitive champion of the Stuart Restoration, as he engineers a magnificent career in high-seas piracy and returns home, a wiser, if no less boisterous, rebel. The direction of William Keighley is equally alert and scenic, whether scouring the craggy, heather-strewn battlegrounds of the clansmen or capturing the lusty barbarism of the pirates’ island sanctuary. And since the dialogue is more often pungent than standard, the motivations and characterizations retain a surprising air of conviction, for all the flying kilts, sabers and sails. Mr. Flynn is, in turn, bold, roguish and forgiveably self-satisfied in his best swashbuckler since “The Sea Hawk,” thirteen long years ago. The featured players, a spanking round-up, are crisp, restrained and forceful, one and all, particularly Roger Livesey and and Anthony Steel, and the ladies in the case, Beatrice Campbell and Yvonne Furneaux. Last but not least, the truly stunning color photography of that British ace, Jack Cardiff, provides a canvas that stands as a model of its kind and fully rates the classic archive reserved for Mr. Stevenson, long, perhaps, after Mr. Flynn and company are forgotten. Meanwhile, Mr. Flynn is having himself, as well he might, a field day.

THE MASTER OF BALLANTRAE, screen play by Herb Meadow, based upon the Robert Louis Stevenson story directed by William Keighley and presented by Warner Brothers. Jamie Durisdeer . . . . . Errol Flynn, Col. Francis Burke . . . . . Roger Livesey, Henry Durisdeer . . . . . Anthony Steel, Lady Alison . . . . . Beatrice Campbell, Jessie Brown . . . . . Yvonne Furneaux, Lord Durisdeer . . . . . Felix Aylmer, MacKellar . . . . . Mervyn Johns, Arnaud . . . . . Jack Berthier, Mendoza . . . . . Charles Goldner, Maj. Clarendon . . . . . Ralph Truman

— Gentleman Tim

 

In the Beginning

05 Aug

August 5, 1935 – 85 Years Ago Today – Begins on Captain Blood

— Gentleman Tim

 

Darlings

04 Aug

From Errol to Rory and Deirdre

August 4, 1959:

Darlings,

It hurts so much and I am so disappointed that we won’t be able to see each other this summer … I must go to Spain to try to make some money and besides the Jamaica house is not yet finished …

But whatever happens I am definitely going to pick you up and take you to Jamaica for the Christmas vacation. And you can help me get this new house fixed up and all feminine and stuff. All the things I don’t know anything about … and we’ll have horses and boats and maybe I can even fix you up with some dates, although I guess I’m going to be a little jealous when all those nice looking guys come around …

I love you so very, very much.

Your Baron

— Gentleman Tim

 

A Deep Dive

03 Aug

Into the Pioneering Photography of Peter Stackpole on August 1 and 2, 1941

Photographer Peter Stackpole (1913-1997), was the son of artists, Ralph Stackpole and Adele Barnes Stackpole. Educated in the San Francisco Bay area and Paris, Peter Stackpole grew up under the influence of his parent’s friends and peers, Dorthea Lange, Edward Weston and Diego Rivera. Maturing in this supportive artist community, Stackpole began developing his photographic style at a young age. Stackpole’s appreciation for the hand-held camera and his developing technical expertise found a perfect subject in the construction of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge.

In 1935, twenty-five of Stackpole’s bridge photographs were exhibited at the San Francisco Museum of Art. This led to several freelance projects and in 1936, when Henry Luce established his ground-breaking “picture” magazine LIFE, Stackpole was hired as one of the four staff photographers. Stackpole worked for LIFE from its founding until 1961, moving gracefully between photographing the glamorous and young in Hollywood, and the more routine lives of the laboring class, always endeavoring to present his subjects authentically.

“Stackpole’s portraiture of Hollywood stars created approachable and endearing characters, and is recognized as a pioneering contribution to “media culture,” solidifying Hollywood icons as a subject of fascination within popular culture.”

“Stackpole’s most dramatic moment happened in 1941, when he was assigned to rendezvous with Errol Flynn’s yacht Sirocco to take underwater pictures of Flynn spearing fish.”

“I used to be a kind of beach bum between assignments, but it never occurred to me to take underwater pictures,” Stackpole said. “I’d never seen an underwater camera. Fins weren’t invented yet, and face masks were few. I had a friend make up a plastic box to hold my oldest, most expendable Leica.”

“Aboard the yacht, Flynn fitted him with a pair of hand-carved wooden goggles to use underwater. Stackpole got 15 decent shots before his camera flooded [including] one shot of Flynn climbing the mast of the Sirocco.”

The photos from this shoot were not only technically and artistically masterful, they were also taken during what later proved to be the most tragically pivotal times in Errol’s career – a time he came to perpetually rue because of Miss Peggy LaRue.

— Gentleman Tim

 

We Welcome New Author Barb Leff!

03 Aug

Good to have you with us, Barb, as always. Looking forward to more great comments and posts!

— David DeWitt

 

Beverly Aadland on Joe Pyne Show!

02 Aug

Joe Pyne was basically a shock jock and a despicable guy …

— David DeWitt

 

Figure This Quiz!

01 Aug

The following three sets of measurements were recorded as belonging to three Hollywood stars circa 1942. One set belonged to the mighty Flynn. Which set was it? To whom did the other two sets belong to??

Thank you to one of the world’s best Flynn researchers for finding these figures! Very few measure up to him!

Irish blood in all three.

All worked for Warners.

One was a star before Errol and later married a good friend of Errol. He, though, was not a good friend to Errol – likely out of bitter envy because he did not generate the sparks or voltage Errol did, either with women or on screen. In fact, even his wife liked Errol more than she liked him.

The other was a friend to Errol, but played enemies of him in two films. He became a big star after Errol did.

— Gentleman Tim

 

Quite a Story — Errol F. and F. Scott F. in Esquire

01 Aug

classic.esquire.com…

— Gentleman Tim

 

Love on the Rocks

01 Aug

August 1, 1950

Los Angeles Herald Examiner

“Sitting only two seats apart, without a glance to each other, Errol Flynn and the first great love of his life, Actress Lili Damita, are shown in court in the legal battle over Flynn’s petition to cut down his alimony payments to her. Flynn is seeking a reduction on her $18,000 annual tax-free alimony, and Miss Damita is fighting to protect it. They appeared without exchanging greetings.”

— Gentleman Tim