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Archive for the ‘Film Reviews’ Category

Two-Hour Blitzkrieg Upon the Human Nerves?

23 Mar

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March 23, 1940

Frank S. Nugent
The New York Times

All the extravagant adjectives in the book, plus a few lalapaloozas especially constructed for the occasion, may be employed without challenge by the Warner Brothers in calling attention to their latest prospection in the epic vein, “Virginia City.” For such a bundle of action-melodrama, such an excess of old-time super-colossalisms has not been seen in years to compare with this veritable archive of familiar outdoor thrill tricks, now showing at the Strand.

Practically everything guaranteed by long experience to stimulate an audience’s excitement—everything except technicolor—has been utilized by the Warner workshop to contrive this two-hour Blitzkrieg upon the human nerves.

From the moment that Federal Captain Bradford and Captain Irby of the Confederate Army square off in a Richmond prison, you and they are in for it, with such successive episodes as an explosive escape from the prison, a fight atop a runaway stagecoach, the usual roistering in a frontier town saloon, an outlaw raid upon a covered-wagon train and the arrival of the United States cavalry to while away the time. There is even a last-minute pardon from the lips of President Lincoln.

Put together as it is from patches which have the well-worn look, it is inevitable that this story of an unsuccessful Confederate attempt to run gold from Virginia City during the last days of the Civil War should be strictly synthetic. There is something depressingly pat about the personal interludes. You just know the beautiful Confederate spy, who doubles as a dancing girl, will fall in love with the Union captain, that she will agonize between love and duty, that the end will be duly heroic.

And, as played by Errol Flynn and Miriam Hopkins, the leading roles become no less obviously carpentered. Mr. Flynn is about as mobile as a floor walker; Miss Hopkins recites her stilted lines by rote. Only Randolph Scott as the Confederate captain behaves as though he was actually on the spot.

But waving the individuals aside, which is what is usually done in outdoor thrillers, there is enough concentrated action in the picture, enough of the old-time Western sweep, to make it lively entertainment. After all, with such models for obvious reference as “The Covered Wagon,” “Stagecoach” and even a bit of “Gone With the Wind,” Director Michael Curtiz could hardly have missed.

— Gentleman Tim

 

A Newcomer Named Errol Flynn

27 Dec

December 27, 1935

A Newcomer Named Errol Flynn in a Handsome Film Version of Captain Blood

“A spirited and criminally-handsome Australian named Errol Flynn plays the genteel buccaneer to the hilt.”

— Gentleman Tim

 

Ain’t Santa. Not Sinatra. Bogus Bogie.

25 Dec

From Forgotten Christmas Films

“Not your typical Christmas film, but you see Errol Flynn dressed up like Santa Claus! Phil (Errol) and Ellen (Eleanor Parker) Gayley are divorced. Their daughter Flip (Patti Brady) and Phil aren’t very happy about the divorce and hope to win Ellen back from her new boyfriend, Rex (Donald Woods). All of this takes place during Christmas as Phil and Rex both dress up like Santa and a comedic mix-up occurs. To review: A cute movie that really takes place during Christmas by chance, but still shows the importance of family. This is actually one of my favorite Errol Flynn movies, because we get to see him in a comedic, husband type role in New York, rather than a swashbuckling role in Spain.”

— Gentleman Tim

 

The Perfect Specimen

11 Dec

December 11, 1937

WHAT THE PICTURE DID FOR ME

The Perfect Specimen: Errol Flynn, Joan Blondell — It is a natural. Plenty of clever stuff and Flynn and Blondell are good in the roles as the perfect man and the gal who knows what’s good for him — A.E. Goodman, Columbia Theatre, Columbia City, Ind. General Patronage.

— Gentleman Tim

 

Errol Flynn’s Ghost Returns

09 Sep

An Immersive Glimpse at Old Havana

www.miaminewtimes.com…

El documental ‘Errol Flynn’s Ghost: Hollywood in Havana’

Los cubanos siempre estuvieron enamorados de Hollywood. ¿Fueron correspondidos?

amp-elnuevoherald-com.cdn.ampproject.org…

Video
www.elnuevoherald.com…

— Gentleman Tim

 

The Adventures of Star Wars

05 Sep

‘What George Lucas Borrowed from The Adventures of Robin Hood to Make Star Wars’

www.slashfilm.com…

Errol Flynn exudes exuberance that can’t be understated as the beating heart of the film.

Flynn makes The Adventures of Robin Hood a joy to watch.

Not only did the film get the legend of Robin Hood, of medieval heroes and villains, right, it got them so right that its distillation of the myth is still the gold standard almost a century later.

In 2003, Roger Ebert wrote:

The ideal hero must do good, defeat evil, have a good time, and win the girl. The Adventures of Robin Hood is like a textbook on how to get that right.

— Gentleman Tim

 

An Avalanche of Adventure

01 May

From

From this week’s Fayetteville Flyer:

“Northern Pursuit”

“Though he was Australian-born, Errol Flynn was one of the United States’ most popular commodities during World War II.

Flynn made a name for himself swashbuckling across the silver screen in such classics of the 1930a as 1935’s “Captain Blood” and 1938’s “Adventures of Robin Hood,” but during the early 1940s few Hollywood stars made more of a splash in war pictures than Flynn. Films like 1941’s “Dive Bomber” and 1942’s “Desperate Journey” cemented him as one of Hollywood’s greatest stay-at-home warriors.

One of Flynn’s most overlooked pictures “Northern Pursuit” comes from the same era and is set against a World War II backdrop as he stars as Steve Wagner, a former corporal in the Royal Canadian Mounted Police that goes undercover to root out a covert Nazi scheme.

The film, which Turner Classic Movie channel is scheduled to play at 7 p.m. (CT) Tuesday was Flynn’s first movie after being acquitted of two statutory rape charges in 1942. Though Flynn’s was never as popular after the trial as he was before, he still knew how to carry adventure movies and romance pictures alike.

“Northern Pursuit” is a solid thriller, directed by the capable Raoul Walsh, who also directed Flynn in the Gen. George Armstrong Custer biopic “They Died With Their Boots On” in 1941.

Walsh amps up the tension and leaves the viewer questioning whether Flynn is a turncoat or not through much of the movie which co-stars Julie Bishop, Helmut Dantine, John Ridgely, and Gene Lockhart.

www.fayettevilleflyer.com…

Avalanche!

— Gentleman Tim

 

Best Western

12 Mar

“10 favorite Western movies”

Number 1:

“They Died with Their Boots On” (1941): Friends of mine know how much I enjoy the old Errol Flynn movies, and this might be the best of them all.

www.whig.com…

— Gentleman Tim

 

Wha?! No. 2?! To What!?!

11 Feb

Regarding “The Adventures of Robin Hood”:

“This classic American technicolor tale is considered by many to be the best Robin Hood film of all time and for good reason. It stars Errol Flynn in the best role of his career as the valiant archer and Olivia de Havilland as his love interest, Maid Marian. The story follows the legend of Robin Hood more closely than any other on this list and the action is excitingly inventive. You get the real sense that the creatives behind this masterpiece wanted to push boundaries and test limits with every sword-fight, archery-contest, and all-out battle. It’s a must-watch if you’re a fan of the source material and it would’ve ranked number one if it weren’t for… ”

www-syfy-com.cdn.ampproject.org…

— Gentleman Tim

 

The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood!

24 Dec

Was The Adventures of Robin Hood a Christmas movie?

Read this and tune in Christmas on Sky to see!

t2m.io/pR7dgXzy…

“A film does not have to have to take place at Christmas to qualify as a Christmas film. It takes something more. And to this list I would add The Adventures Of Robin Hood (1938), starring Errol Flynn, the template for every ‘Robin’ that came after him.

This movie, for me, was like a big Christmas bauble itself. Shot in glorious colour, with lots of green and red, like a Christmas tree itself, it featured the forest, a place to be free. It had a jolly man at the centre who delivered the gifts of his own presence and joy.

It had a dreamer (Maid Marian) waiting for the promise of her life to be fulfilled. And that score. That glorious score, like the feeling of the carols in church, voices sweeping to the ceiling and through the nave, giving us one more moment of the promise of the year to come and a good feeling about the year gone by.”

——-

One can also watch on Little Christmas – in Cincinnati, with Flynn on the Big Screen:

www.mariemonttheatre.com…

— Gentleman Tim