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Archive for the ‘Dates & Girlfriends’ Category

The Baron Plays The Duke — Errol’s Last Live Show

29 Sep

September 29, 1959
The Red Skelton Show

www.imdb.com…

Filmed at (CBS) Television City, at the famed Studio 33, the home of the Red Skelton Hour and Show, the Carol Burnett Show, I Love Mama, the Mary Tyler Moore Hour, the Price is Right, Match Game, Hollywood Squares, the Steve Allen Comedy Hour, and many, many others. With it’s massive studios, and other favorable conditions, Television City very powerfully signalled and helped make possible the relocation of television’s epicenter from New York to LA.

~ “Red Skelton portrays hobo Freddie the Freeloader and Flynn his friend, “the Duke.” After a group of beatniks, including Beverly Aadland, mistakes Freddie’s shack for a coffee bar, Freddie is informed by a policeman that all bums have been ordered by the city council to leave town by sundown. Freddie and the Duke decide that the only way they will be able to stay in town is to open their own beatnik coffee bar. Singer Scott Engel (who later went on to fame as Scott Walker of the Walker Brothers) sings Paper doll.”


— Gentleman Tim

 

Errol’s Last Adventure? — In Majorca? – ¿De Verdad?

27 Sep


A New documentary about Errol’s years in Majorca, featuring Michael Douglas, et al

Diana Dill in 1943, six months before she married Kirk Douglas. I believe Errol dated her in 1942.

— Gentleman Tim

 

On the Set of the Edge

27 Sep

September 26, 1942


Harrison Carroll
Evening Herald Express

LIGHTS! CAMERA! ACTION!

Out at Warners, on the Edge of Darkness set, they are shooting another war story. The scene is a church in occupied Norway. But the villagers are not listening to a sermon. They are hearing reports of Nazi terrorism.

Up on the pulpit is the minister, Richard Fraser. In the congregation are Walter Huston, Ann Sheridan, Errol Flynn, Monte Blue and most of the cast of the picture.

Edge of Darkness is heavy drama. When director Lewis Milestone gets shot, however, the players relax, sit around the set and converse in ordinary Hollywood manner.

Today Ann Sheridan is jittery because she is trying to cut down on cigarettes. She’s allowing herself one every hour, on the hour.

Smokin’ Annie, “on the hour” with Errol, between nicotine fits on the set of the Edge:

Looks like Annie was well off the wagon after the war, smoking away as the notorious Nora Prentiss:

— Gentleman Tim

 

From Florida for Olivia

01 Jul

à votre santé et bon anniversaire de Highland Beach, Florida

— Gentleman Tim

 

To the Immortal Olivia

01 Jul

A Global Toast to Olivia de Havilland on her One Hundred and Fourth Birthday, July 1, 2020

Four for Olivia on Her 104!!!!

….

One from Errol Flynn Blog Author, Tina Nyary (aka Bariebel)

….

….

— Gentleman Tim

 

Global Toast to Olivia De Havilland on Her 104th Birthday — 3 Days Away — Wednesday, July 1, 2020

28 Jun

Watching you all these years has been a most gracious thing, Olivia. Happy Birthday!

— Gentleman Tim

 

No Highballs, Jingle Bells or Rah-Rah

13 Jun

But it was a Really Big Shew Nonetheless

June 13, 1939

Ed Sullivan

Hollywood Citizen News

Director Mike Curtiz, one of the best on the Warner lot, has a bad memory for names….He calls John Garfield “Group Theater”….Claude Rains, to Curtiz, always is “Mister Theater Guild”….Wayne Morris is “Bank Night”….Olivia de Havilland is “Baby”….In Elizabeth and Essex, Curtiz became impatient with a love scene that Errol Flynn and Bette Davis were doing, and stopped the action….”Remember always,” he explained, that this is a 17th Century love story without the highballs, jingle bells and rah-rah”….

— Gentleman Tim

 

A Very Gracious Olivia — June 3, 2009

03 Jun

Answering by a letter she dated June 3, 2009, questions from Nick Thomas of Tinseltown Talks:

[How many films did you and Errol Flynn appear in together?]

I worked with Errol in eight movies from 1935 to 1941. We appeared quite separately, however, in a ninth film, ‘Thank Your Lucky Stars,’ in which we had no connection whatsoever. This film’s shooting dates extended from October 1942 to early January, 1943. Our first film together, “Captain Blood,” began August 5, 1935 and ended in October, 1935.

[Your final film together was “They Died with Their Boots On.” Did you ever see Errol again?]

After ‘Boots’ was completed in September, 1941, I saw Errol only three times during all the years that followed:

1. At Harvey’s Restaurant in Washington, D.C., in the spring or early summer of 1942 when, perceiving John Huston and me dining there, Errol crossed the room, sat down at our table, and conversed for a while.

2. Very briefly at a soirée in Los Angeles in the spring of 1943.

3. In the fall of 1957 at the Beverly Hilton’s Costumers Ball. Quite unexpectedly, while I was talking to friends during the cocktail hour, Errol left his own group and asked if he could take me to dinner. He seated me on his immediate right and, soon joined by others, took on the role of gracious host with everyone on his left – all the ladies – while I did my best to entertain the gentleman on my right.

[Over the years, Errol has been sensationalized by the press and authors. Has he been mischaracterized?]

His roguish reputation was very well deserved, as he more than candidly revealed in his remarkable autobiography, ‘My Wicked, Wicked Ways.’ However, through this very same book we also know that he was a reflective person – sensitive, idealistic, vulnerable, and questing. But I think he has been incompletely represented by the press: it vulgarized his adventures with the opposite sex and seldom, if ever, touched upon or emphasized the other facets of his life.

[Errol had 4 children, a son and 3 daughters. What were his feelings about parenthood?]

I know that, as a very young man, Errol very much wanted children. Children were, in fact, an issue between Errol and Lili (his first wife) in the early years of their marriage as Lili, influenced by a common belief in those times, was afraid that carrying a child would threaten the perfect figure with which she had been blessed. Later, when the marriage was disintegrating, Lili changed her mind and Sean Flynn, that beautiful child, was born. It may well be that the only steadfast loves of Errol’s life were his love of the sea, his love of his house, and his love of his children.

[Flynn was never recognized for his acting with even an Oscar nomination. Was that an oversight?]

Unfortunately, at the time when Errol enjoyed his greatest success, the adventure film, as a genre, was not sufficiently appreciated and therefore his appearances therein were not as highly regarded as they might. ‘The Adventures of Robin Hood’ is perhaps an exception: it was nominated for the Academy Award as Best Picture in 1938. The film was based on an historical legend, and this gave it a certain prestige. As to which of Errol’s performances should have merited an Academy Award, I would have to run all of Flynn’s films to give a proper reply!

However, I do feel he played his roles with unmatchable verve, conviction, and style. In doing so, he inherited the mantle of Douglas Fairbanks, Sr., who was my favorite film star at the age of 9 and whose ‘The Black Pirate’ made an indelible impression on me. No one since Errol has worn that mantle; it is buried with him.

[Olivia concluded her letter with the following post script.}

On June 20th (Flynn’s birthday), I will raise a glass of champagne to Errol, as I always do.

— Gentleman Tim

 

The Producer(s)

01 Jun

June 1, 1939

Louella O. Parsons
Los Angeles Examiner

Hadn’t been back but a few minutes when I heard that Jack Warner plans a Westward trek serialization with Mark Hellinger, the well-know Hearst writer, making his debut as a producers, and Michael Curtiz directing. Dodge City, which brought in the shekels, gave Warners the notion. Errol Flynn, Olivia de Havilland, and Ann Sheridan, will star in Tombstone, laid in 1881, starting with the line in Dodge City, let’s go to Virginia City.” That name cannot be used because of the RKO movie. After Tombstone, City of Angels, a history of early Los Angeles in 1889, will be made with same cast and director.

Well, as we Flynnmates know, Tombstone was never made with Flynn, Olivia, or Annie. Nor was City of Angels. Virginia City was made, but not with Mark Hellinger producing. Hellinger, an extremely popular and successful show business figure, known not only for his great writing talent but also for his loyalty and fairness, got fed up and left Warner Bros. in response to Jack Warner’s egomaniacal habit of not giving proper production credit to others. (JW infamously did the same to Hal Wallis over the Oscar for Casablanca.) Hellinger did return, however, to produce his wartime baby inspired by MGM’s first musical (and part Technicolor production,) Broadway Melody of 1929,Thank Your Lucky Stars. So, Hellinger did finally get to produce a film with Errol, Olivia, and Annie, though certainly not how he had originally envisioned. Moreover, he got to act in the film himself, as can be seen in the clip below, in full from ~ 0:50 to 1:50. That’s him with Eddie Cantor.

Here’s Mark Hellinger with Errol’s Man Friday, Alex Pavlenko, at Mulholland Farm’s legendary bar. This photo is from the Deirdre Flynn Collection. A better image of this can be seen in Robert Matsen’s Errol Flynn Slept Here. Thank you, Deirdre.

— Gentleman Tim

 

Memorial Day 2020, 3 PM

25 May

In addition to his early and enthusiastic anti-Nazi tour of South America, his war bond tours, his appearances for the Red Cross, and his anti-Axis war films, Errol also supported the troops and country as a star on USO tours, including in 1943, at various locations in Alaska, including Amchitka, Attu, and Dutch Harbor, with Martha O’Driscoll, most notably.:

Meanwhile, Back in Korea

And here is a 5-minute preview of Our Man from Mulholland’s, i.e. Jack Marino’s, magnificent tribute to our Forgotten Heroes, part of which was filmed at the location of the former Mulholland Farm. Thank you, Jack!

— Gentleman Tim