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Archive for the ‘Film Clips’ Category

Most Exciting Costume Play of This or Any Other Era

13 May

The Adventures of Robin Hood; Released May 14, 1938

Quotes from Louella O. Parsons’ glowing review of The Adventures of Robin Hood

The Adventures of Robin Hood is the most exciting costume play of this or any other era. Cunningly combining melodrama, romance, and colorful adventure, it romps along at Twentieth Century speed, making us forget we are seeing legendary characters who lived in the swashbuckling of early England.

Robin Hood comes to us in the person of dashing Errol Flynn, whose performance tops anything the young Flynn has yet given to the screen.

There couldn’t be a lovelier Maid Marian than Olivia de Havilland.

Basil Rathbone gives one of his topping performances as Sir Guy of Gisbourne.

Claude Rains reaches new heights.

Ian Hunter is the perfect King Richard the Lionhearted.

You’ll like the kittenish Una O’Connor, the prankish Eugene Pallete, the hearty and lovable Alan Hale, the weak, spineless Sheriff of Nottingham played by the sterling actor, Melville Cooper, merry crew member Herbert Mundin, and Patric Knowles.

Much credit goes to that splendid director, Michael Curtiz, and William Keighley

The music, by Erich Wolfgang Korngold, is enchanting.

Costumes by Orry-Kelly are beautiful.

The photography, by Tony Gudio and Sol Polito, is poetic.

Perc Westmore, may I say, did a great job on makeup.

The Technicolor adds materially to the beauty of the picture.

Joe Mantegna, who sought and received a Hollywood Walk of Fame Star next to Errol’s, gives a Flynntastic interview about the greatness and importance of both Errol Flynn and The Adventures of Robin Hood. He is a true fan.

— Tim

 

Against All Flags at the Madam Walker Theater

08 Mar

March 7, 1953

Against All Flags at the Historic Madame Walker Theater in Indianapolis

newspapers.library.in.gov…

— Tim

 

Cameraman & Referee: Best Assignment He Ever Had

26 Feb

On February 26, 2006, the American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) presented its Lifetime Achievement Award to Richard Kline. a prestigious honor presented annually to an individual who has made exceptional and enduring contributions to the art of filmmaking.

Richard Kline was born on Nov. 15, 1926, into a Los Angeles family that included three prominent ASC cinematographers: his father, Benjamin H. Kline, and two uncles, Sol Halperin and Philip Rosen. However, he said, he took up camera work at age 16 not out of any great love for the craft — his passion was surfing — but because World War II was raging, and his father believed such training would help him qualify for a camera unit when he was called to serve. He started at Columbia Pictures in 1943 as a slate boy on the Technicolor musical Cover Girl, and by the time he entered the U.S. Navy the following year, he had advanced to first assistant cameraman, spending two months in Acapulco filming The Lady from Shanghai. “Welles was brilliant, and here I was, this kid along for the ride.”

“In Acapulco, we used Errol Flynn’s yacht, The Zaca. Apart from a brief cameo, Flynn did not appear in Shanghai”

“Errol Flynn and Orson Welles were quite a pair. There was never a dull moment.” “We were on location down in Acapulco and it was a very wild time.” “Errol lent his yacht to Orson for the film. Errol himself served as the skipper.”

“Along with the rest of the crew, one of Kline’s responsibilities was to referee the nightly bar fights that would break out between Welles and Flynn after the two had spent several hours heavily “unwinding.””

Orson, Rita and Chula

Orson and Richard Kline

In order to shoot the location sequences, a company of 50 Hollywood actors and technicians flew to Acapulco, along with 60 Mexican extra players and technicians from Mexico City. More than 15 tons of equipment were shipped from Hollywood, one order of six tons comprising the largest single air express shipment ever undertaken by a movie location company.

Scenes were filmed above and below decks, at anchorages in Acapulco Harbor, at Fort San Diego in Acapulco Bay, at Morro Rocks and other scenic spots, as well as at sea. A lavish new night club, Ciro’s, located atop the swank Casablanca Hotel in Acapulco, also served as a setting, as did the 25-mile stretch of white sand beach at Pied de la Cuesta.

The transportation of heavy sound and camera equipment through the tangled Mexican jungle was a major problem, but overcome by the sheer manpower of several hundred Mexican porters and canoe men. Sound trucks and generators were placed on native canoes lashed together to form barges, and then were floated through jungle-cluttered streams into shooting position.

“Shooting aboard the yacht was, from the space standpoint very difficult, and these scenes, as they appear in the picture, are necessarily cramped in composition — but this actually worked in favor of the overall effect because it produced an authentic atmosphere of crowded life aboard a small yacht.”

During filming aboard The Zaca, a long line of native dugout canoes anchored astern formed a bridge from the barge holding the generator so that electrical cables could be stretched for the camera and sound equipment.

Said Kline six decades later: ” It was the best assignment I ever had,”

(Left) On location in Mexico, Welles briefs his crew prior to filming a sequence. (Center) The Zaca is anchored in Acapulco Harbor. Astern are a line of barges over which electrical cable was stretched between the yacht and the generator boat. (Right) For a scene shot in the jungle streams of Mexico, the camera is mounted on a dugout canoe alongside the boat in which the principle players ride.

— Tim

 

“He Was Born For This” — December 2, 1859

02 Dec

Errol’s Cinematic Connection to One of the Most Consequential Events in American History – The Hanging of John Brown on December 2, 1959 – Which Resulted in the Election of Abraham Lincoln, the Civil War, and All the Race-Related Controversies and Conflicts that have Ensued in the United States, to This Very Day.


— Tim

 

Never Say Goodbye Meets Jive Bomber and Babalu

22 Nov

November 22, 1946
At the Strand in Manhattan

Jive Bomber

Led by Ray McKinley, famed drummer for Glenn Miller’s Army Air Force Band

Babalu by Señor Babalu

A Sensational Vocal and Dance Performance!

I Remember You
Lorraine and Ragnon

Lorraine’s husband and dance partner, Roy Ragnon, died in a plane crash during a WW II USO tour. Lorraine suffered very serious injuries from that same crash, and made an heroic comeback as a singer and comedienne, thus performing without her husband at the New York premier of Never Say Goodbye. This crash was depicted in the Susan Hayward film, With a Song in My Heart.


— Tim

 

Remember, Remember – The Fifth of November

04 Nov

The Fifth of November, 2020

A Timely Interruption

“The film V for Vendetta is a wonderful mix of Phantom of the Opera, Errol Flynn, and the Count of Monte Cristo, combined with modern day reaction to government overreach.”

“V is a beautiful spectacle of a film, with heavy doses of Shakespeare and Errol Flynn…”

“V is an anti-hero character … with an endearing Errol Flynn like persona.”

“V is dashing and sympathetic, like an anarchist Errol Flynn.”

“The film does a phenomenal job of insinuating flippant Errol Flynn…”

Can You Hear It?

Errol-like Repartee and Fight Scene

— Tim

 

Pat Wymore Sing and Dance 1951 …

29 Jun

— David DeWitt

 

“History is history”

30 Dec

December 28, 1937

Hollywood Citizen News

Sidney Skolsky Presents
Watching Them Make Pictures

Errol Flynn, Olivia de Havilland, Claude Rains, and a crowd of extras are getting ready to play a scene for the picture, Robin Hood.

The setting is Nottingham Castle in England, and a feast is about to take place. Errol Flynn is Robin Hood, and Claude Rains is Prince John. The extras, dressed as knights, stand out in their shining armor. Director Mike Curtiz seems out of place, wearing trousers and a sweater.

Dirctor Curtiz gives the signal that he is ready. The cameras are turning. Robin Hood Flynn, lugging a deer, walks toward the banquet table. Here Prince John, with meats and wines before him, is entertaining. Robin Hood Flynn offers him the deer for the feast.

It is then that Prince John interrupts the scene and becomes Claude Rains.

He says to Curtiz, “Mike, I forgot to tell you something. I’ve been doing some research on the part. And according to history, Prince John was a vegetarian, and he never drank wine.”

Miss de Havilland and Mr. Rathbone, standing at the banquet table, are amazed, but say that history is history.

But this doesn’t stop director Curtiz. He says: “We need this big scene for the picture. In the movies we don’t make historical pictures, we make history.”

— Tim

 

Pray Tell!

17 Dec

Errol Flynn’s William Tell

“The Story of the Uncompleted 1953 CinemaScope Film”

— Tim

 

No Buffalo in Modesto

02 Dec

But it’s a great excuse to steal a kiss from Olivia!

December 1, 1938

Los Angeles Examiner

Behind the Makeup

By Erskine Johnson

ON THE SETS: EXTERIOR — PRAIRIE — MODESTO, CALIF.

Errol Flynn and Olivia de Havilland ride to the top of a low ride and pull their horses to a halt. Their eyes travel over the countryside. Flynn, making his debut as a Western hero in Dodge City, lifts his arm, points off into the distance.

“See that herd of buffalo grazing so peacefully over there?” he says to Miss De Havilland.

She nods and her eyes follow his outstretched hand. Then she breaks into an involuntary giggle, spoiling the scene.

Flynn’s “herd of buffalo” is a lone, tired looking cow.

But when the picture is completed, the cow will be a real herd of buffalo. A camera crew traveled all the way to Oklahoma to photograph one of the few remaining herds of the animals that made the nickel famous. There aren’t any in California.

— Tim

 
 
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