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Archive for the ‘The Early Errol’ Category

Flynn River

28 Jun

You always rolled in style
And always brought a smile …

Oh dreammaker, you heartbreaker
You were off to see the world,
And there was such a lot of world to see …

June 28, 1935

Harrison Carroll – Los Angeles Evening Herald Express

Lili Damita’s new groom, Errol Flynn, is versatile to no end. In addition to acting for Warner pictures (he has a good chance for the lead in Captain Blood) the young Irishman is writing a book about his experiences in the interior of New Guinea.

Seems he once went there on commission of the British government to promote peace between the tribes of aborigines. And, while there, was lucky enough to make a gold strike and have a river named after him.

All in addition, of course, to his prowess as an athlete. Flynn was the amateur boxing heavyweight champion of Ireland and competed in the 1928 Olympic Games. And he’s an ace at tennis, too, which is Hollywood’s favorite game.

— Gentleman Tim

 

More On In Like Flynn

28 Jun

See photo of “Errol” on the “Sirocco” from Luke’s In Like Flynn.

www.redlandcitybulletin.com…

Summary below is extracted and adapted from the above-linked article by Cheryl Goodenough.

“The movie stars Australian actor Thomas Cocquerel, from Red Dog: True Blue and Kidnapping Mr Heineken, as Errol Flynn.

It is being co-produced by Flynn’s 41-year-old actor, writer and producer grandson Luke Flynn.

A 100-person film crew set up at Cleveland’s Raby Bay to shoot In Like Flynn.

Directing In Like Flynn is Australian Russell Mulcahy of Highlander, Teen Wolf and Resident Evil: Extinction fame.

Mr Mulcahy said the film was taking full advantage of Moreton Bay at its best.

“The first time I came here on the location survey to Cleveland, I fell in love with it,” he said.

“It’s perfect – it’s exactly what we need.

“How could any director not enjoy this part of the world? It is stunningly beautiful, from sunrise over the water to sunset.”

In June 2015, Pirates of the Caribbean star Johnny Depp put Cleveland on the filming map.

Redland City is fast earning a reputation within Queensland, Australia and overseas as a great place to make great television and movies.

The city was recently recognised at the premiere of Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales on the Gold Coastfor its welcoming community, film-friendly council and its spectacular water-based locations.

Scenes from Flynn’s exploits in Papua New Guinea were shot in the Mount Tamborine area.

Set in the 1930s, In Like Flynn tells the story of Flynn in his twenties when he discovered a map on a dead prospector while serving as a guide for a Hollywood producer in the jungles of Papua New Guinea.

In Sydney, Flynn rounds up a crew, who steal Sirocco, a yacht belonging to Chinese opium smugglers and they voyage up the Australian east coast.

Mr Mulcahy said In Like Flynn was an “honest seat of your pants true life action adventure about a group of guys lead by Flynn, who barely make it through some incredible situations”.”

— Gentleman Tim

 

Meet the Mayor

04 Jun

Mayor David Wenham – from 300, Lord of the Rings, Pirates of the Caribbean, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera.

“Last month the hard working Wenham played Christian Travers, the fictional mayor of Townsville in director Russell Mulcahy’s Errol Flynn biopic In Like Flynn, shot on the Gold Coast.

Produced by James M. Vernon and Corey Large, the film follows the early life of the Tasmanian-born Flynn (Red Dog: True Blue’s Thomas Cocquerel) as he and his friends set sail from Sydney to New Guinea in search of gold. The mayor is the local bookmaker and brothel owner. Other cast members include Callan Mulvey, Isabel Lucas, Corey Large, William Moseley and Clive Standen.

Wenham relished the chance to work with Mulcahy, describing him as a great character and an absolute hoot.”

— Gentleman Tim

 

Luke is In > In Like Flynn

20 May

In Luke Flynn:

Luke is in In Like Flynn, playing his “later-in-life” Grandfather Flynn.

www.timescolonist.com…

— Gentleman Tim

 

IN LIKE FLYNN BEGINS!!!

04 May

PER THE IMBd: This biopic depicts Errol’s roust-about early life in Australia, before he became an internationally famed celebrity. In those days he was an adventurer, opium smuggler, gambler, street fighter, womanizer, and gold prospector. The film, based on Flynn’s early autobiography “Beam Ends,” was written for the screen by Luke Flynn, who found the inspiration as a result of travels through Australia in the footsteps of Luke’s iconic grandfather.

__________

Characters beyond Errol’s days of Beam Ends have been previously mentioned also, including Olivia De Havilland and Michael Curtiz. See, for example this previous IMBd cast of characters:

m.imdb.com…

And a possible “former wife” featured in this new article:

www.dailytelegraph.com…

Starring Thomas Cocquerel & Isabel Lucas

— Gentleman Tim

 

“In the wake of the bounty” 1933

13 Jan

From TROVE Digitised Newspapers, National Library of Australia

Brisbane Courier Mail        23/03/1932

 

Mr Charles Chauvel who produced “The Moth of Moonbi” and “Greenhide,” in Queensland some year ago, is to produce a series of films for Expeditionary Films Ltd., a Sydney company. Mr Chauvel, accompanied by his wife Elsa, and a camera staff, will travel far from the beaten track in search of cinema material. Adventure and romance are to predominate in the films, to be produced by this company.

Besides a feature film, Mr. Chauvel will make a series of historical and travel films.  These will be recorded with German and French dialogue as well, as English.   Mr Chauvel will commence production next month at the studio of Australasian Films, Bondi, Sydney.

 

 

Sydney Morning Herald        23/08/1932

 

MUTINY OF THE BOUNTY –  Reconstructed for Films.   Mr. Charles Chauvel returned to Sydney on

Saturday, after travelling 15,000 miles in little known parts of the Pacific Ocean, to make a film depicting the mutiny of the Bounty for Expeditionary Films, Ltd., an Australian company.  Every effort has been made to produce the film historically, and present a faithful picture of the wanderings of the mutineers, before they reached Pitcairn Island, where they burned the Bounty,

 

And Lieutenant Bligh’s epic voyage of 4000 miles, in an open boat to Batavia, after he had been cast adrift with l8 loyal members of his crew.  Mr. Chauvel followed the route of the Bounty and saw the remains of the ship lying in the clear water at Pitcairn Island.  Native dances were filmed at Tahiti, where the mutineers stayed. Natives had to be specially chosen, as knowledge of primitive dances Is rapidly dying out.

Members of the party had an unpleasant experience at Pitcairn Island. They were Inspecting the coast in an open boat, when the engine failed, and they were blown out to sea.  They managed to make repairs just before sunset, and made a dangerous return to the Island through the surf, which is always heavy.

Mr. Chauvel said that his company believed that Australian history was too much neglected, and attempts would be made to fill in the gaps.  Arrangements have been made for copies of the film to be prepared with Spanish and German comment.

 

Sydney Morning Herald     15/03/1933

EXPEDITIONARY FILMS LTD.  “BOUNTY” PICTURE LAUNCHED !!

 

To-day, at the Prince Edward Theatre, the film, “In the Wake of the Bounty,”  which Mr. Charles Chauvel produced recently, with Tahiti and Pitcairn Islands as the principal backgrounds, will be given its first public screenings.

At the Australia Hotel yesterday, the directors of Expeditionary Films Ltd., under whose auspices Mr. Chauvel has made the film, entertained members of the Press and the motion picture Industry at luncheon.

Mr. S. Utz (Chairman of Expeditionary Films, Ltd.) presided.  COL. M. P. Bruxner, who is a member of the company, outlined some of the difficulties which Mr. Chauvel had had to face In making the film;  difficulties of transport; difficulties of organisation; and, finally, difficulties of censorship. The members of the company, being amateurs in the film business, had been amazed, and then appalled, at the amount of obstinacy and pugnacity which had to be displayed, before a film finally reached its public.

 

Mr. C. Brunsdon Fletcher spoke of the essential soundness and solidarity of the British Empire, in a world where every other nation was reeling beneath the shock of disaster (the depression).  After all, it was human character, as expressed in national outlook, which remained the predominating factor.  The producers of this film had done something decisive and valuable to make their country known elsewhere.

Mr. Hec C. MacIntyre (Managing Director of Universal Films – Aust) said that his Company considered it was only doing Its duty in trying to establish Australian films abroad. The launching of the Australian product In England, was no easy matter, either.  The English exhibitor was conservative. He preferred to concentrate on English and American productions.  Some of the earlier Australian films had been extraordinarily difficult to market. In Mr. Chauvel’s picture, however, he was confident that he had something to appeal to the tastes of the whole world.

Mr. H. Saxton (Secretary of Expeditionary Films) also spoke.

 

The West Australian        1 December, 1933

 

IN THE WAKE OFfHE BOUNTY              New Australian Production.

 

Travelogues and dramas have drenched the screen- with the- spray of South Sea beaches until the film-goer imagines that he knows every angle from which a palm can be photographed. Then an Australian, Mr. Charles Chauvel,. makes ‘In the Wake of the Bounty,’ and presents the Pacific under a strange and cloudy beauty, such as has not been filmed.  Mr. Chauvel, however, is more concerned with the savage languor of the tropics; he masses the brilliance of wild dances and flowers to show the pathetic contrast between the islands, which link that famous mutiny, Tahiti and Pitcairn, writes the Film Editor of the Sydney ‘Sun.’

Thus that first part of the. film is a glamorous reconstruction of history, with young Errol Flynn playing the part of Fletcher Christian – Mayne Lynton that of Bligh, and Victor Gouriet that of the blind fiddler, who tells the tale.  The scenes aboard ship are effectively done; then, by filming the journey made down the

Pacific by the Chauvels themselves, Pitcairn comes into view and the title of the picture falls into its proper pace.

 

The latter sequences of the film admirably bear out the intention of the producers (Expeditionary Films, Ltd.) to chart the unknown tracts of the world.  Pitcairn, of which the serious and religious people, appalling surf and precipices, prim houses and vegetable patches, are shown in absorbing detail, is one of those places which, as the steamer route moves farther out, will be less frequently visited.

Drama as well as travel has been caught by the film; human romances, swift tragedies, interludes as exciting as any fiction, all enthral the audience.

‘In the Wake of. the Bounty’ will be shown at the Theatre Royal in December, with ‘Leave it to Me’ (Gene Gerrard).

 

“In the wake of the Bounty” 1933 (24)

 

Australian Screen Site

Errol Flynn

Photo of Errol Flynn 1933

As a cast member:   Errol Flynn as Fletcher Christian 1933

In the Wake of the Bounty (1933)

This list shows all the titles currently on australianscreen , that include Errol Flynn in a principal role.  It is not a comprehensive screen-o-graphy.

Singleton Argus           30/01/1933

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NEW SOUTH SEAS FILM – CENSOR OBJECTS TO DANCE SCENES.

– SUPERVISED BY CLERGYMAN.

 

The South Seas film “In the Wake of the Bounty,”  which the Commonwealth Censor  (Mr Creswell O’Reilly) insists must be submitted for certain cuts, will be placed before the Censorship Appeal Board by the’ producer, Mr Charles Chauvel who said that the dance scenes to which Mr. O;Reilly had objected, had been supervised in the making, by a Methodist clergyman.

 

Sydney Morning Herald       11/02/1933

 

Top of Form

THE “BOUNTY” FILM.                         Appeal to Minister for Customs.

 

Mr. Charles Chauvel, who directed “In the Wake of the Bounty,” staled last night that the Censorship Appeal Board had considered the film, and announced its decision.  When the sections of the picture photographed in Tahiti came before the Commonwealth Film Censor (Mr. O’Reilly) recently. ? he ordered three excisions before the film could be publicly screened within Australia.  He also ordered that a cut should be made In the section photographed within the Commonwealth, before the completed film could be exported lo other countries.  The Appeal Board passed every part of the production except

one set of incidents which relate to a native dance.

Mr. Chauvel declares that he and his Board ol Directors intend to carry their case from the Appeal Board to the Minister for Customs.  They feel, he says, that their film has been unfairly chosen  for attack, while foreign productions embodying the same type of incident, have been allowed admission to this country, without comment.

If the Minister fails to reverse the decision of the Appeal Board”, he goes on, “In the Wake of the Bounty” will not be screened in Australia.  Its’ owners will simply send it abroad, and concentrate on the oversea market  The scenes of the native dance are the pivot of the whole production.  If they are deleted, the film will be spoilt.”

 

National Screen Archives

 

Title No: 496
Title: IN THE WAKE OF THE BOUNTY : ORIGINAL RELEASE.    Country of Origin:  Australia
Production Date: 1932    Media: Film
Release Date: 15 March 1933    Duration:   01:04:00
Produced as: Feature Film    Category: DramaCast:    Marie Rosenfeld, Errol Flynn, Mayne Linton
Cinematographer/Director:  Tasman Higgins

Director:    Charles Chauvel

Company:  Expeditionary Films

Summary:  Retells the story of the mutiny led by Fletcher Christian in 1789 against William Bligh, depicting the fate of the mutineers on Tahiti and Pitcairn. — General notes: Shot on location and in Sydney. The wreckage in the film portrayed as that of ‘The Bounty’ is in fact that of ‘The Cornwallis’, which was wrecked in 1875. — Source:   Queensland Maritime Museum.

In 1935, M.G.M. bought American rights to the film and re-edited it to form two short travelogues, ‘Pitcairn Island Today’ (1935) and ‘Primitive Pitcairn’ (1936). These were used as promotional aids for the studio’s own production of ‘Mutiny on the Bounty’.

Source: Australian Film 1900-1977, Andrew Pike and Ross Cooper.

 

 

— Isabel Australis

 

Just A Nice Photo

05 Jan

— twinarchers

 

Errol’s House & Treehouse?

22 Nov

Errol’s old digs. Near the Errol Flynn Reserve Playground, too!

www.themercury.com…

7e1ff57fd991606a3a1418465d923488

Anyone for tennis? Errol flynns former residence. Circa1885 sandstone/weatherboard mansion. 295m over three levels including 11 rooms and sunroom.

Once home to Hobart’s most famous export Errol Flynn, this gracious 1885 house is brimming with charm and intrigue.

The sheltered backyard incorporates a tree house, believed to be constructed from the remains of an old shed burnt to the ground by a young Errol (whose father was a university lecturer in the early part of last century).

Located across the road from the Domain Tennis Centre, this substantial dual-access residence offers a commanding city and Mt Wellington outlook.

The three-level mansion designed by prominent architect Henry Hunter has many outstanding features including the original front door lock and doorbell knob. Other fine features include a wide verandah (which overlooks the meticulously maintained Tennis Centre), an imposing bay window, lofty ceilings, four-panel doors and romantic fireplaces.

Magnificent proportions create a sense of grandeur. Long sash windows mix with original timber floorboards in the family living room, which opens to the spacious eat-in kitchen. The beautiful mountain and city outlook creates an outstanding backdrop for family and guests in the sun-drenched kitchen and adjoining sunroom.
The formal dining room brings together neutral carpeting and a coal-grate fireplace, which is flanked by bookshelves.

Possibly the most impressive room is the formal sitting room with striking bay window and fireplace with fluted surrounds.Seven bedrooms and three bathrooms are scattered across the multi-level home, ideal for an expanding family or a couple who wish to accommodate overnight guests. The four sunny upstairs bedrooms are particularly appealing, with their charming arched windows, pretty views and abundance of natural light.

The lower level opens to the backyard, which in turn connects to Lillie St (providing convenient vehicular access).
Other noteworthy features include 2x reverse-cycle heat pumps, off peak heating and a security alarm system.

* Prime Location
* Designed by Henry Hunter
* Stunning Views
* 6 Sector Reticulation
* New Carpet
* 1885 Sandstone/Weatherboard Mansion
* 3 x Bathrooms
* 11 x Rooms & sunroom
* Possible 7 x Bedrooms
* Overlooking The Domain Tennis Club
* Off Street Parking
* House size 295m
* Land area 424m

— Gentleman Tim

 

An Eighty Years Ago Quiz

18 Sep

In September of 1936. it was reported that, during his days in New Guinea, Errol had hunted and sold snakes for a widely-heralded herpetologist.

Who was this famous man?

Clues:

1) He was a preeminent pioneer in his field.

2) He was also a celebrated author and public speaker.

3) He had a very close association with The Bronx Zoo.

4) Here are two photos of him, one in his early expedition era, the second taken approximately at the time Errol was reportedly capturing snakes for him:

1cf41d7a-3b87-4245-9743-f580b057dc5a-713x1020

the-snake-man

— Gentleman Tim

 

Your Vote is Requested!

12 Sep

At the IMDb Poll below:

www.imdb.com…

www.imdb.com…

vote

murder-he-said

— Gentleman Tim