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A Speedie Recovery

27 Jul

July 27, 1936

Jimmy Starr
LA Evening Herald Express

Eight years ago when adventuresome Errol Flynn, now Warner’s new film rave, represented the British Government at New Guinea, one of his many odd duties was to act as physician and surgeon.

When a native named Joe Speedie appeared at headquarters with a gangrenous toe as a result of having been bitten by a poisonous fish, it was “Dr” Flynn who performed the necessary amputation of the infected toe. The emergency operation saved Joe’s life.

Last week, “Dr” Flynn received a belated fee for his surgical gesture, a valuable gold-headed cane. Joe explained in the accompanying letter that he had seen Errol in Captain Blood and was most happy to have located his benefactor of long ago. And Errol’s quite proud of his ‘fee.’

The article says that Speedie was bitten on the toe by a poisonous fish. What it likely meant is that he was bitten or injected by a venomous fish.

Venom is injected. Poison is ingested.

“Poisonous fish are fish that are poisonous to eat. They contain toxins which are not destroyed by the digestive systems of animals that eat the fish. Venomous fish also contain toxins, but do not necessarily cause poisoning if they are eaten, since the digestive system often destroys their venom.”

I believe the fish which “bit” (i.e. injected) venom into Joe’s toe may have been a Stonefish. They are prevalent in the waters off Papua New Guinea and are “the most dangerous venomous fish in the world.

They are the most venomous fish in the world. The attack can last as little as 0.015 seconds! When not chasing their prey, they move slowly. But they’re venom is speedy, more speedy than Speedie.

“Stonefish are venomous marine fish classified in the genus Synanceja and the family Synancejidae, found in shallow waters of the tropical Indo-Pacific. They are sluggish, bottom-dwelling fish that live among rocks or coral and in mud flats and estuaries. Thickset fish with large heads and mouths, small eyes, and bumpy skins covered with wart-like lumps and, sometimes, fleshy flaps, they rest on the bottom, unmoving, blending almost exactly with their surroundings in form and color. They are dangerous fish. Difficult to see, they can, when stepped on, inject quantities of venom through grooves in their dorsal-fin spines. Wounds produced by these fish are intensely painful and sometimes fatal.”

Watch your step! They can also live and attack on land for up to 24 hours!!

— Gentleman Tim

— Gentleman Tim

 

Sadly, Olivia de Havilland has Passed Aged 104 …

26 Jul

Olivia de Havilland, ‘Gone With the Wind’ Star, Dies at 104

— David DeWitt

 

Producer? Movie? Role? Actor?

26 Jul

In the mid-1940s, a very famous personality and friend of Errol produced a movie in which he wanted Errol to play a key role. Errol, however, did not appear in the film, thus providing a very big break for the person who did play the role and went on to become a star.

Who was the producer? What was the movie? What was the role? Who played the role?

— Gentleman Tim

 

Errol Flynn: I Rock this Hat …

25 Jul

— David DeWitt

 

Errol in England – July 25, 1933

25 Jul

Errol in England

– July 25, 1933 –

— Gentleman Tim

 
 

Errol Deposed: Too Few Visits and Too Many Taxes

24 Jul

July 24, 1950
Los Angeles Herald Examiner

“Deposition filed by Screen Hero Errol Flynn (second from left) charged today he is permitted to few visits to his son by his ex-wife-actress Lili Damita, and that he is forced to pay ‘taxes on taxes’ on both income and money he gives his wife. He has petitioned for reduction in alimony payments. WIth him after court appearance are Attorney Sid Dorfman (left), for Miss Damita, and Flynn’s attorneys, Jerry Giesler (right) and Bob Ford.”

— Gentleman Tim

 

The Black Prince ———— aka The Warriors ———— aka The Dark Avenger

24 Jul

July 23, 1954

New York Times

3 STARS ASSIGNED TO ‘BLACK PRINCE’:
Errol Flynn, Peter Finch and Joanne Dru Will Make Film in England for Allied

“FLAMING WITH THE BARBARIC CRUELTIES AND INFAMOUS CONQUESTS OF THE DARK AGE OF TERROR!

Edward, Prince of Wales, son and heir to his father King Edward III of England, leads an English army to the French province of Aquitaine to protect the inhabitants from the ravages of the French. After defeating the French in battle, the defeated French plot to kill the prince. Failing in this, they kidnap his lady, the lovely Lady Joan Holland. Of course Prince Edward has to ride to the rescue, adopting numerous guises to save his paramour, which ultimately end in him leading his men into one final climactic battle against the French.”

— Gentleman Tim

 

Against All Flags — Blu-Ray On the Way

22 Jul

Could Be Today, July 22, 2020.

“In 1700, the pirates of Madagascar menace the India trade; British officer Brian Hawke has himself cashiered, flogged, and set adrift to infiltrate the pirate “republic.” There, Hawke meets lovely Spitfire Stevens, a pirate captain in her own right, and the sparks begin to fly; but wooing a pirate poses unique problems. Especially after he rescues adoring young Princess Patma from a captured ship. Meanwhile, Hawke’s secret mission proceeds to an action-packed climax.”

— Gentleman Tim

 

Cruisin’ with Professor Flynn

21 Jul

July 21, 1946 – New York Times
“Errol Flynn’s Father Here For Expedition”

“Theodore Thomson Flynn, Professor of Zoology at Queens College, Belfast, Ireland, and the father of Errol Flynn, screen actor, arrived yesterday on the United States liner Washington, which docked at Pier 62, North River, from Le Havre, Southampton and Cobh.”

Cruisin’ on United States liner Washington

Pier 62 – Now the Northernmost of the Chelsea Piers

July 29, 1946 – Los Angeles Times.
“Errol Flynn’s Father Arrives to Join Cruise”

The Flynn Family to Research the Tuna Family

Cruise of the Zaca

— Gentleman Tim

 

Errol’s First Jane Eyre?

21 Jul

On the weekend of July 18-20, 1947, Cry Wolf was played at the Strand in Manhattan. Was Cry Wolf Errol’s first “Jane Eyre” of sorts, his second being The Master of Thornfield? That is, was 1947’s Cry Wolf inspired by 1847’s Charlotte Brontë masterpiece? Perhaps Orson Welles and Joan Fontaines’ 1943 version of Jane Eyre is worth comparing…

Jane Eyre

Cry Wolf

The Master of Thornfield

— Gentleman Tim