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Archive for the ‘Special Events’ Category

Film Stars Invade Dodge

01 Apr

April 1, 1939

From the Depot to the Rodeo to the Theaters

— Gentleman Tim

 

The Warner Bros. Dodge City World Premier Special ==== “A Hollywood Parade on Wheels”

01 Apr

STARS GET WELCOMED FOR FILM PREVIEW

Evening Herald Express

By Jimmy Starr

Dodge City, Kan. April 1 (1939)

For years they have been saying that Hollywood is colossal, but it took the Warner Brothers’ 14-car special train which arrived in Dodge City this morning to prove that moviedom was never colossal until today.

With no strings on a bank account, the party, which includes 35 stellar names, 72 newspapermen and magazine correspondents and cameramen and dozens of studio technicians departed Thursday night from Santa Fe station in Los Angeles and arrived in Dodge City this morning.

A typical Hollywood gathering of several thousand persons were at the station to greet the stars. Radios and loud speakers blared gala tunes. Dozens of luminaries were ushered through wildly gesticulating crowds.

The baggage car of the special train was transformed into a replica of the famous “Gay Lady Saloon” of Dodge City’s wildest and wooliest days, and it was visited by thousands of Dodge City fans.

OLD WEST ATMOSPHERE

The Warner studio had given it an Old West atmosphere with sawdust on the floor, typical signs warning customers against crooked faro dealers and advice to check shooting irons with the bartender. All it needed to complete the picture was a dirty old villain to shoot it up and a tree to hang him on.

Then there was a palace car, but it was not for for the human stars of Hollywood. Instead it housed 16 equine stars to be used in an especially staged rodeo in Dodge City this afternoon as a warm-up for the triple preview of the 2-million dollar Technicolor picture Dodge City tonight. In order to accommodate the terrific influx of visitors from four states it was necessary to engage three theaters, which will run all night, to show the production to the tremendously swollen population.

150,000 THERE

Dodge City, which has a normal population of 13,000 persons, is today entertaining a swarming multitude of 150,000 yelling, restless, staring, snoopy, autograph-hunting, curious, hungry, thirsty, dusty, foot-weary and movie-mad spectators. As a tribute to Jack Warner and the picture, Dodge City citizens took it upon themselves to emulate the founders of their rough and ready village by growing enough bushy beards that not only would frighten Boris Karloff, but also would supply a thousand baseball teams for the House of David. It was indeed a sight to turn a mattress factory green with envy.

ODDITIES BETWEEN WHISTLESTOPS

Olivia de Havilland, heroine of the picture, was the heartbroken ingenue of the train when she was rudely and without warning snatched from the special at Pasadena.

It seems that Mr. Selznick, who stalled for two years before making Gone with the Wind, is now in a big hurry. It also happens that Miss de Havilland is playing Melanie in Mr. Selznick’s picture and there was rumor that her presence would be needed. Olivia jumped up and down, stamped her feet, yelled and carried on. But she isn’t on the train anymore. Poor Melanie.

SCHOOLS LET OUT

Unusual fascination for such a stellar caravan caused city officials of three cities to declare a school holiday so that Young America could see and hear some of its celluloid heroes and heroines. Fifteen-minute stops were made in Flagstaff, Ariz.; Gallup, N.M.; and Albuquerque, N.M. Indians, Mexicans, hermits, prospectors and ranchers with their families came afoot, on horseback, in rickety buggies and chugging jalopies to join the townsfolk in their amazing display of admiration for Hollywood’s parade on wheels.

— Gentleman Tim

 

Dodgin’ Like Flynn

31 Mar

March 31, 1939

Harrison Carroll
Evening Herald Express

Lili Damita let Errol Flynn go on to the Dodge City preview trip alone. She and Dolores Del Rio are spending time at Palm Springs.

Dodgin’ Like Flynn

— Gentleman Tim

 

Captain Blood on the Saddle

28 Mar

March 27, 1939

Evening Herald Express

Errol Flynn will bounce along in a $25,000 silver saddle for the rodeo at Dodge City. The history of the Santa Fe Trail is engraved on it.

Dodge City’s First Rodeo

“A mile long parade featured the actors and elected officials, including the governors of Kansas, Colorado and New Mexico. This was followed by a rodeo” at McCarty Stadium. Though there was not enough time to stage a full-fledged rodeo, the event inspired Dodge City to have its first real rodeo, the Boot Hill Roundup, later that year. This event has evolved into today’s PRCA’s Dodge City Day’s Roundup Rodeo.

For Those Who Want to be Dressin’ Like Flynn in a Long-Haired Beaver, Frontier Fur Felt Cowboy Hat!

— Gentleman Tim

 

Honeymoon, Yes — Marriage, No

27 Mar

www.todayifoundout.com…

Honeymoon Over Miami Way

March 28, 1938

Jimmy Starr

Although maritime laws permit a captain to perform a perfectly legal marriage ceremony, it isn’t as easy as it might sound. There are certain official papers that a seaworthy captain must have.

Of course, Errol Flynn is the captain of his yacht, but that doesn’t alone give him the right to tie the holy bonds of matrimony, as he was informed by local maritime officials.

And that revelation somewhat changes the marital plans of Gertrude Hemmer and Ralph Cobley, Miami friends of Errol’s, who planned to have the Warner star perform the wedding ceremony for them aboard his new yacht, which stops over at the southern city en route to Hollywood. The couple will be married on shore and will spend a brief honeymoon aboard Flynn’s boat.

Miami Beach 1938

Miami 1938

— Gentleman Tim

 

Olivia & Oscar No. 2

23 Mar

March 23, 1950

After she made it big with Errol, Olivia won two Best Actress Oscars. She won her first in 1948 for “To Each His Own”. Seventy years ago today she won her second, for “The Heiress”. Below is Jimmy Stewart’s announcement of her winning, and her acceptance speech:


P.S. Ralph could tell us better than anyone else on earth who won Best Actor

— Gentleman Tim

 

Dodging Dodge City? — OR Dreading Bette D?

22 Mar

March 20, 1939

Louella O. Parsons
Los Angeles Examiner

If Errol Flynn fails to show up for his preview, Bob Taplinger is going to lose some money. Errol’s trusting P.A. is betting that he will be there, but knowing the Flynn temperament I wouldn’t want to do any wagering myself. Errol doesn’t have to be back in Hollywood until May, when he plays Essex to Bette Davis’ Elizabeth.
Another change in the schedule has put The Knight and the LadyThe Miracle. You’ll see Claude Rains as Bacon, poet laureate of the Elizabethan era. It will all be in Technicolor. Bette’s first. This Queen Elizabeth is based on Robert Sherwood’s “Elizabeth the Queen”.

— Gentleman Tim

 

$500 Reward Quiz

10 Mar

What does a $500 reward have to do with Errol Flynn?

— Gentleman Tim

 

Morning After

05 Mar

March 4, 1939

Erskine Johnson
Behind the Makeup
Los Angeles Examiner

Morning after the Academy Awards banquet, Donald Crisp sent a telegram to Errol Flynn, vacationing in the South. “Dear Errol,” it read. “Last night the Academy Awards banquet was held. Your name was not mentioned.”

Deplorable that Flynn was not even nominated for his immortal portrayal of Robin Hood.

The nominees were:

Spencer Tracy, for Boys Town

Charles Boyer, for Algiers

James Cagney, for Angels with Dirty Faces

Robert Donat, for The Citadel

Leslie Howard, for Pygmalion

And the winner was:

Spencer Tracy, for Boys Town

www.oscars.org…

Proper Evaluations of Flynn’s Greatness

The model of an action hero in 1938’s The Adventures of Robin Hood, the dashing star made the swordplay and wooing look so effortless that it’s easy to ignore the craft behind his derring-do. – Entertainment Weekly

 

He was the Tom Cruise of the 1930s, a global superstar whose natural charisma and box-office power put him at the tippytop of Hollywood — and he never won an Oscar. Unlike Cruise, Flynn was never even nominated, not for “Captain Blood,” “The Charge of the Light Brigade” or 1938’s still-dazzling “The Adventures of Robin Hood.” – Boston Herald

 

Unfortunately, at the time when Errol enjoyed his greatest success, the adventure film, as a genre, was not sufficiently appreciated and therefore [Errol’s] appearances therein were not as highly regarded as they [are now.] … [He] played his roles with unmatchable verve, conviction, and style. In doing so, he inherited the mantle of Douglas Fairbanks, Sr., who was my favorite film star at the age of 9 and whose ‘The Black Pirate’ left an indelible impression on me. No one since Errol has worn that mantle; it is buried with him. – Lady Marian Fitzwater

 

— Gentleman Tim

 

Leap Day 1940 – Part 1

29 Feb

The day the Oscar leaped by Olivia: books.google.com…books.google.com…

— Gentleman Tim