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Archive for the ‘Mail Bag’ Category

Mail Bag! Adventures of Robin Hood Mistakes!

21 Dec

The Mail Bag brings us this interesting list of mistakes in Errol’s classic The Adventures of Robin Hood from our fellow Flynnmeister Jan Vander vliet:

Enjoy!

Revealing mistake: When Will Scarlet finds the injured Much in Sherwood Forest about three quarters of the way through the movie, a white vehicle can be seen travelling from right to left in the background.

Revealing mistake: When Robin jumps off the scaffold after being saved from hanging, you can see one of the soldiers spear tips bend under his weight.

Continuity mistake: In the scene where Robin is rescued from hanging, watch the shadows on the church in the background. It keeps going in and out of shadow.

Continuity mistake: After winning his fight with Guy of Gisbourne, Robin races to Marian’s door with his badly bent sword in hand. The moment he enters Marian’s chamber, the sword is perfectly straight again.

Continuity mistake: When Robin is competing in the golden arrow archery contest, Marion’s veil alters between being behind her right shoulder to in front of her shoulder, depending on which camera is shooting her.

Continuity mistake: The horse Robin is on when he is exhorting his men to return to Sherwood and the one he is on when he rides over to the right to slash the portcullis rope could be two different horses as their saddle cloths are different colours.

Continuity mistake: In the final swordfight, Basil Rathbone lunges past Errol Flynn, who dodges him and leaps to the floor below. Rathbone continues on dropping his sword at the base of the steps. In the next cut, however, the sword lies between Rathbone and Flynn – a good eight feet away – allowing Robin Hood to pick it up gallantly and offer it back.

Continuity mistake: The scene where Robin is being chased through Sherwood Forest, early on in the film, is supposed to be taking place at night. But, at several times, blue sky can be seen overhead. This was corrected on the DVD.

Continuity mistake: After escaping from hanging, Robin heads for the castle gate. The first time we see it, the portcullis rope Robin later cuts is hanging away from the castle in a nice loop. In the next shot it is hanging vertically, but reverts to being a loop again for the rest of the scene.

Continuity mistake: At the beginning of the movie when Errol Flynn is escaping from within the castle he starts with five arrows in his quiver. He shoots ten, and when he’s finished he still has five left.

Continuity mistake: Robin, in his escape from the scaffold, pauses on his horse before the portcullis and exhorts his men to return to Sherwood. He then rides over to the right, draws a sword from behind him and slashes through the rope which activates the portcullis and rides the rope to the top of the wall. No sword is seen on the horse when he is exhorting his men.

Continuity mistake: When the soldiers have the man tied to some wine barrels, they begin filling a metal jug, but then they throw a wooden mug over his head.

Continuity mistake: In the scene near the beginning when Robin is in the “great hall” — a spear is thrown at his chair. He arises in time to avoid injury, but the spear goes through the back of the chair. However, the next time you see the chair, there is no hole in it.

Continuity mistake: When Robin escapes from hanging, he jumps from the scaffold onto his horse and rides off, all with his hands tied behind his back. When he jumps, just briefly before the shot changes, you can see his hands break the breakaway bindings and grab the horse’s saddle.

Continuity mistake: In the feast in the forest scene which occurs after Robin Hood and his men capture Sir Guy’s entourage, Robin sits next to Marian and offers her a roasted bird. She refuses the bird, but when the camera cuts back to Robin he has a mutton leg. Next the camera goes back to Marian who looks at Robin who now has the bird agaain.

 

Thanks, Jan!

— David DeWitt

 

Mail Bag! Crossed Swords Remembered!

14 Dec

Vincenzo Castaldo writes us about his new book on the filming of Errol Flynn’s Crossed Swords circa 1954. You may remember him from a previous post last year. His book is finished and was the center of attention in the village of Lauro at the Lancellotti Castle where the movie was filmed when Vincenzo (who lives in Lauro) held a public showing of the film, and discussion of his book. It was a grand affair attended by all the dignataries of the town. Vincenzo speaks no English but does well with Google Translate:

Crossed Swords – Stories and anecdotes about the Holy Grail by Errol Flynn (Il Papavero).

(Il Papavero is the book’s Italian Publisher. It may also be purchased online, he says.)

The book, the result of a three-year research conducted by the author mainly between Naples and Rome, unveils the gestation and elaboration of “Crossed Swords” (M. Krims, 1954), a compelling and unknown film from ’52 and ’53 made in Cinecittà , at Real Bosco di Capodimonte in Naples and in the Irpinia villages of Lauro and Marzano with the main interpreters Errol Flynn and Gina Lollobrigida.

The book is divided into four parts. The first offers a historical synthesis of swashbuckling, which found fertile ground first in America and then in Italy since the Thirties, and pays tribute to stars such as Burt Lancaster, Sean Connery, Antonio Banderas and Johnny Depp who, in the wake of the mythical Errol Flynn, have made the caste of the hood famous. The second focuses exclusively on the cinematographic work of Milton Krims, revealing the artistic and technical cast, the plot, the places and the various assumptions about how the troupe has landed in Lower Irpinia.

The third part includes a series of stories, stories and very funny anecdotes retrieved by the author, who interviewed the exclusive diva Gina Lollobrigida, Prince Pietro Lancellotti with his sisters Ginevra and Maria Cristina, who met the main interpreters during the realization of the film in the family castle, and several citizens of the time of Lauro who have lived the period of filming or have participated in the film with more or less important roles.

The fourth and last part includes news and various curiosities about the vicissitudes of the company during the period of the film, the journalistic reviews of the major newspapers of the time and those “found” by four great critics of Italian cinema, including the late father of David Gian Luigi Rondi.

Everything is accompanied by scene photos and amateur shots found by the author.

The book uses the preface by Valerio Caprara (well known film historian and journalist) and the afterword by Alessandro Cecchi Paone. A well respected journalist).


Thanks, Vincenzo!

 

— David DeWitt

 

Mail Bag! Rathbone! Audio Version of Michael B. Druxman’s One Person Play!

07 Dec

Michael B. Druxman writes to us:

The audio edition of Michael B. Druxman’s one-person stage play, RATHBONE, just became available on Amazon, Audible and, within a day or two, iTunes.

Jake Sanson delivers a terrific performance as Basil Rathbone.

And, Errol Flynn is definitely an unseen presence.

Thanks, Michael!

— David DeWitt

 

Michael B. Druxman and FLYNN!

20 Nov
The Mail Bag brings us this good news!
Michael writes:

I just got word that the audio adaptation of FLYNN, my one-person stage play about Errol Flynn, is now available for download on Amazon, audible.com… and, within a day or so, iTunes. Sam Burns brings the screen’s most famous Robin Hood to life in this production, which has been enhanced with music and sound effects. Enjoy!

Michael B. Druxman
Please visit my author page at Amazon.com…
www.amazon.com…michaelb.druxman
Thanks, Michael!

— David DeWitt

 

Museum of Flight & The Dawn Patrol with Errol Flynn!

10 Nov

Eric Tillerson sends us this via the Mail Bag:

Down at the Museum of Flight in Renton, Wa., in the WWI section, they have the coat that Errol wore in The Dawn Patrol on what I believe is permanent display, shown next to the Academy Award that the earlier Fairbanks version of the film won. Sadly they spell his name “Erroll”, but coming across this was still a nice surprise. Some photos attached.
Regards,
Eric
Thanks, Eric!

— David DeWitt

 

Flynn, the Play coming soon to Audio!

31 Oct

Michael Druxman writes to us:

Hello,

I just discovered your blog.

I thought you’d like to know that an audio edition of my one-person stage play, FLYNN, is currently nearing the end of production and, if all goes well, should be available for download before the end of November via Audible, Amazon and iTunes.  Sam Burns plays the role of Errol Flynn.

In the meantime, paperback and Kindle editions of the play are available via the link below.

www.amazon.com…

Michael B. Druxman

Thanks, Michael!

— David DeWitt

 

Mail Bag! Compass of the Zaca?

17 Oct

The Mail Bag brings another Question!

I am trying to find out information about the compass/binnacle that was originally installed on the Zaca.

My friend has one that he believes came from it. I have researched the compass and it was purchased from ES Ritchie & Sons in 1930.

I do not know if you would have more information about the binnacle from the Zaca like the serial number or what happened to it?

 

Thanks!

Crystal

 

— David DeWitt

 

Mail Bag! My Wicked, Wicked Ways TV Movie Question!

15 Oct

In the Mail Bag today:

Dear Flynn Blog,

I just finished watching the aforementioned TV movie on DECADES. Very enjoyable. I’m trying to find out who Billy Welch, the stunt man who died after he fell off a horse in the TV movie, was based on. Couldn’t find any info for him online so I’m guessing that wasn’t the stunt Man’s real name.

Delmo Walters, Jr.

Thanks, Delmo!

— David DeWitt

 

Mail Bag! Errol Flynn Collectibles from Gene Ingram!

11 Oct

 

Gene Ingram writes to us:

I have listed some more movie memorabilia on Ebay, Lobby cards for the movie , “ The Sun Also Rises “, Lobby card for “ Too Much Too Soon “, An original Uncut Pressbook for the Movie,  “ The Sisters “, with Errol and Betty Davis, 8 pages of information for the theaters on advertising and cast members; and all my Errol Flynn personal envelops with stamps reduced to $10.00 each!  Thanks again for a great Blog!

Ebay seller name : nbforestiv

Item numbers:

“ Sisters “ Pressbook 142534003576

“ Too Much, Too Soon “ Lobby card 142529647158

“ The Sun Also Rises “ lobby card 142529648011

“ Along The Santa Fe Trail “ sheet music 142529648310

Errol Flynn Personal Envelops 142529648474 – 8565 – 8689 – 8889 – 9041 – 6374

 

Thanks Again,

Gene

Thanks, Gene!

— David DeWitt

 

Mail Bag! Thomas McNulty: Remembrance of Heroes Errol Flynn

07 Oct

 

Hello David,
Here is some off-track trivia and random thoughts. All of these years later and Errol Flynn comes back to me in bits and pieces; rising from the depths of our cultural swamp with startling clarity. All of sudden there he is staring back at me from a stack of old Life magazines in some faraway antique shop; or grinning mischievously from some faded old movie magazine along with Roy Rogers and Trigger. I believe I own at least four copies of the famous Life magazine issue, last purchased at a flea market in June for five dollars and in perfect condition. I think of these images as “Lost America” which I’ve written about celebrating our remembrance of heroes and icons from yesteryear. I shouldn’t be surprised by this, although I am. A thousand years from now this image of Errol Flynn on horseback from Rocky Mountainwill no doubt find itself under scrutiny in some digital time-stream, lost in the nebulas of a galaxy swallowed by a black hole, perused by alien eyes, celebrated in song by the civilizations of our intergalactic future. This image has come to represent the iconic personification of the ideal Western hero. Of these images, my personal favorite is the Norman A. Fox paperback reprint by Dell in 1973, a fine novel that Fox reportedly wrote after meeting Audie Murphy on the set of Night Passage with James Stewart, based on Fox’s novel. Fox dedicated Rope the Wind to Audie Murphy who had encouraged Fox to write a novel that involved horses. Rope the Wind is a pretty damn good Western, too. They Called Him Calhoonis from the catalogue of Cleveland Westerns out of Australia, which strikes me as appropriate. Cleveland Westerns are the last pulp fiction Western digest magazines worldwide. The author, Brett McKinley, is a pseudonym for Paul Wheelahan, a prolific Australian author credited for writing hundreds of westerns for both Cleveland Publishing and Hale’s Black Horse Western imprint. There are more, but the Rocky Mountain image shows up constantly. I recently showed this still from Rocky Mountain to a young lass who shall remain nameless, and I asked her if she knew who this was and what did she think of the image? She squinted and pursed her lips, and finally said, “I don’t know who he is, but I wish there were men like him around today.” Need we say more?
Best wishes,
Tom

— David DeWitt