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Archive for the ‘Friends & Family’ Category

Mail Bag! Where the Boys Are! Sean Flynn (Uncredited!)

09 Dec

The Mail Bag brings a nice nugget about the film appearances of Sean Flynn (son of Errol Flynn and Lili Damita …)

I was looking at the filmography of George Hamilton and knew he was in that movie but was not listed as being in it on a particular website, looked further and also found THIS…. Guess who?
WAIT FOR IT….
SEAN FLYNN (UNCREDITED) !
You have to look for “full cast &  crew” to find him. I tried to copy that link to tiny URL but no dice.
How about that!
Audie
GREAT Find … Thanks so much!

— David DeWitt

 

Flynn v. Pigham

09 Dec

December 9, 1983

Thanks, Rory & Deirdre, for standing up so lovingly and heroically for your Father against the creepy, “grievous and disturbing” defamation of Charles Pigham, depicted below.

[Civ. No. 68301. Court of Appeals of California, Second Appellate District, Division One. December 9, 1983.]

RORY FLYNN et al., Plaintiffs and Appellants, v. CHARLES PIGHAM et al., Defendants and Respondents.

law.justia.com…

The Sick and Greed-Driven Mr. Pigham:

— Gentleman Tim

 

Hamilton

05 Dec

A new movie about Sean?

“I want things to give my life gravitas, and that’s the movie about Sean Flynn.”

Errol takes Sean and the Tan Man to ELMO

“We met as teenagers in Palm Beach. One night when we were about 15 and both at boarding school, Errol Flynn showed up in New York and took us to dinner. To El Morocco, which wasn’t even a place to go to dinner, it was a nightclub. Sean and I showed up in our best Brooks Brothers blazers,”

www.townandcountrymag.com…

— Gentleman Tim

 

Help Rory Flynn Bring Sean Flynn & the Missing Back Home!

10 Nov

Rory Flynn, Mike Luehring and Dave MacMillan have created a GoFundeMe to help bring Sean Flynn, Dana Stone and the other missing journalists home … many efforts over the decades have been undertaken and now it is felt that the answers are close to hand. It will take a financial commitment beyond what has already been made, as well as the emotional cost already spent to bring Sean, and other still missing home again. This is our chance to help make it happen, those who have respect and love for all of them. It is a chance to share in the effort, and the accomplishment of what has been a very long struggle …

You can donate any amount you like, however small, it will become a river ..

Please visit the funding page to see a special video Rory has made to help us understand what is at stake …

Sean Flynn

Dana Stone

Errol & Sean

— David DeWitt

 

Sean’s “unWILLing” Will

08 Nov

“unWILLingly … If me so bad, medivac’acked immediately” and “If cool-aid, celestially unredeemable”.

Edited extracts from the new book,The Bite of the Lotus: An Intimate Memoir of the Vietnam War, by Sean’s friend and photojournalist colleague, Carl Robinson

I’d arrived in South Vietnam in early 1964 as an idealistic 20-year-old who grew up in the Belgian Congo and had spent most of my life as an expat. I’d become enchanted with South Vietnam as a visiting university student from Hong Kong and returned to a job in the US-run pacification program, or winning hearts and minds. Quitting in protest after the Tet ’68 Offensive, I drifted into journalism to stay on with the Mekong Delta maiden who’d captured my heart. I’d seen a lot and my initial idealism was a fast-receding memory.

I’d also met a lot of people. Foreigners and Vietnamese. Military, spooks and aid workers. And now a band of reporters and photographers looking for fame, if not fortune, covering a war that had already turned into a seemingly endless quagmire.

Over at the quieter end of the room, by a large open window, I saw someone about my age sitting quietly and alone in a high-backed rattan chair, observing the scene. Tall and handsome with a thin moustache, he was Sean Flynn, son of the actor Errol Flynn. I wandered over to introduce myself.

We found that we had a lot in common. We were both fluent French-speakers, life-long expatriates and comfortable drifting between different cultures, as well as being constantly curious and well read. Sean had spent time in Africa and wore an elephant hair bracelet.

By April 1969 it seemed like things were starting to unravel. I’d just returned from a memorable motorbike trip with Sean through Laos – in which we’d narrowly avoided the Communists and deepened our friendship in the process – when I rode my bike into a barbed wire barrier strung across a Saigon street.

The incident would mark the start of a string of departures and other mishaps in my circle of friends. Most shockingly, (photojournalist/friend) Tim Page was badly wounded by a booby-trapped US-made 105-mm artillery shell west of Saigon. The right side of his brain was blown away, and he was now at the 24th Evacuation Hospital at the huge US base of Long Binh, north-east of Saigon.

Sean heard the news in Vientiane and rushed back to Saigon. Sitting together in the rumble seat of the yellow Citroen convertible of David Sulzberger, son of New York Times columnist Clive, on our way out to Long Binh, Sean was quieter than usual. But when we got there, he purposefully made light of what happened, saying: “You’re crazy, Page, what’d you do that for?” Touchingly, Sean gave Tim a wooden statue from the Cave of One Thousand Buddhas, just upriver from Luang Prabang in Laos, which he’d visited after I left to come back to Saigon.

Clearly, something had happened to our old gang. Just Sean and I were left. He was clearly shaken, and several days later presented me with a handwritten note beginning with the word “unWILLingly”, and including instructions for if he was wounded or killed: “If me so bad, medivac’acked immediately” and “If cool-aid, celestially unredeemable”.

He also noted addresses and to whom I should send his belongings. Sadly, Sean said nothing about what to do if he just disappeared.

Perhaps thinking of our experience in Vietnam and Laos, Sean rented motorbikes for himself and Dana and, along with other journalists in four-wheeled vehicles, headed south-east of Phnom Penh down Route 1, across the Neak Luong ferry over the Mekong River, and then east into the Parrot’s Beak, where the Cambodian border pokes like an arrow into southern Vietnam.

But the Communists, unsure of what would happen next, quickly sealed off the border region and erected roadblocks to halt normal traffic. Just west of a roadblock only a dozen kilometres into Cambodia, correspondents saw a stopped sedan with its doors open. Only the previous day, two French photographers, including my friend Claude Arpin, had disappeared near here, probably a bit further down the road.

What happened next, on that early April day of 1970, is now the stuff of legend – and personal anguish. Eyewitnesses had seen my two friends arguing in a cafe, with Sean trying to talk a reluctant Dana into pushing further down the road. Finally, they hopped on their bikes and, with only a few words, rode past the other waiting journalists straight towards that roadblock.

They were never seen again. Missing, presumably captured.

As reports of their disappearance came into the AP office the next morning, I couldn’t help smiling as I recalled how often Sean and I had fantasized about slipping over to cover the elusive “other side”. It was the holy grail. We’d be welcomed with open arms, take pictures, do interviews and come out with the scoop of the Vietnam War. Sure, I thought, they’ll make it. Just give ’em a few days.

But as days turned to weeks with no news, I was filled with foreboding and despair. And guilt, too. What if I hadn’t been caught and expelled trying to sneak into Cambodia only three weeks before?

It’s certain I would’ve been there too on that fateful day on my own rented motorbike. Would I have backed Dana and refused to go any further? Or would I have followed Sean? I have lived with that torment ever since.

Sean had given me that handwritten will in case he was killed or wounded, but he’d said nothing about what to do if he just disappeared. I was stunned and felt helpless.

— Gentleman Tim

 

Coronado Remembers Rory, Rio & Errol in Advance of Veterans Day Film Festival

06 Nov

“In addition to the many screenings, [the Coronado Film Festival] hosted appearances that have delighted film festival audiences including Errol Flynn’s daughter sharing memories of her father.”

Rio, Rory & Richard Rush (photo taken from seat next to Leonard Maltin)

2019 Coronado Film Festival

“Coronado’s world-class beaches, perfect weather, and proximity to Hollywood have made it a favorite go-to spot for the stars since those halcyon days when Errol Flynn, Mary Pickford and Charlie Chaplin strolled the Avenue. That same avenue, with its unique shops, blooming gardens and alfresco dining, has been named one of America’s five “Most Romantic Main Streets” by the National Trust for Historic Places.”

Rory & Sean in Coronado!

— Gentleman Tim

 

HOLY MORONI! — WHO ON EARTH WAS SHE!?!

19 Oct

Who on Earth was “Chancellor”, aka Mrs. Errol Flynn?

I have recently come across three Mormon “proxy marriage sealings” involving Errol – one to “Lili”, one to “Nora”, and one to “Chancellor”. Yes, that’s correct, “Chancellor”!!!

Who, you may ask, was Chancellor? The answer is simple: I have no idea!

According to official Mormon records of proxy marriage sealings (aka “celestial marriage”):

“Errol Leslie Thomson Flynn (Errol Flynn), was born in Hobart, Tasmania. He was sealed to an ex-wife, Liliane Marie-Madeleine Carré (Lili Damita) on October 3, 1996 in the Manti Utah Temple. On November 3, 2000 in the Albuquerque New Mexico Temple, Flynn was sealed to an unknown spouse named “Chancellor”. Flynn was sealed to another ex-wife, Nora Eddington, on September 18, 2009 in the Boise Idaho Temple.”

So, it appears, according to official records of the Church of Jesus Christ of the Latter-Day Saints, Errol and Chancellor were sealed in eternal proxy marriage on November 3, 2000, at the Mormon Temple in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

…But why? And to whom?

Perhaps “Chancellor” could be a reference to Pat Wymore? Or, perhaps it could be a woman who had a child with Errol, perhaps the mother of James, or Shirley’s girl (Marilyn/Lynn)? “Following a celestial marriage, not only are the couple sealed as husband and wife, but children born into the marriage are also sealed to that family.”

Here’s a summary of the Mormons’ instructions/guidelines for “proxy marriage sealings”:

“The LDS Church has issued specific instructions to Church members regarding proxy marriage sealings. These guidelines state that only dead couples, who had established relationships while they were living, are to be sealed as spouses in Mormon temples.”

“A deceased man may have sealed to him all deceased women to whom he was legally married during his life. A deceased woman may be sealed to all men to whom she was legally married during her life. However, if she was sealed to a husband during her life, all her husbands must be deceased before she may be sealed to a husband to whom she was not sealed to during life. Deceased couples who were divorced may be sealed. This may provide the only way for their children to be sealed…A deceased couple who lived together as husband and wife may be sealed, even if the marriage cannot be documented.”

A description by a former performer of celestial marriage ceremonies:

“MUCH SECRECY SURROUNDS THE SACRAMENTS THAT take place in the temples of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. For Mormons—whose numbers can be difficult to quantify—the temple is the center of family and community life. It is also where ”eternal marriages” take place.”

“Known within the Church as “sealing,” eternal marriages bind a couple together forever. As in, forever—beyond mortality. In fact, sealings can be performed on people who have already died, to ensure they are eligible for entry into the highest echelons of Mormon heaven. Posthumous sealing—in which a deceased person is wedded to either another deceased person or one who is still alive—is performed regularly within the Church, but the details of the ceremony are not usually disclosed to people outside the faith.”

“Mormons believe there’s various degrees of heaven. In order to gain entrance to the highest one, where you get to be a god and create your own worlds, you have to have received certain ordinances. They call them “keys.” And one of those is being married. So people who have died and never had the chance to get sealed—that’s what Mormons call getting married in the temple—can have it posthumously done for them. And that’s the point of going to the temple and doing sealings.”

“Faithful Latter Day Saints believe civil marriages are dissolved at death, but that a couple who has been sealed in a temple will be married beyond physical death and the resurrection if they remain faithful. This means that in the afterlife they and their family will be together forever. An illustrative difference in the marriage ceremony performed in LDS temples is the replacement of the words “until death do us part” with “for time and all eternity”.”

Any ideas or input, Flynnmates!?

— Gentleman Tim

 

Sean on the Island of the Coconut Monk

10 Sep

Per’The World According to Roger Steffens’:

Where is the most interesting place you’ve visited?

“The Island of the Coconut Monk. I went there for the first time in January of 1969 with John Steinbeck IV and Sean Flynn, Errol Flynn’s son. It was basically a mile-long sand bar in the middle of the Mekong River inhabited by thousands of drop outs from the war, led by a 4 and a half-foot hunchback monk who hadn’t lain down in the previous 20 years. Anyone who came to his island without a weapon was welcomed, no questions asked. They had deserters from the North Vietnamese communist forces, the South Vietnamese army, and daoists. They prayed to Christ, Buddha, Mohammad, Lao Tze, Confucius, Sun Yat-sen, Victor Hugo and Winston Churchill. The North bank of the river was controlled by the Americans and the South bank by the communists, and they’d fire rockets and mortars over the island, but never touch the island. It’s the only place in Vietnam that I saw happy people. It was there that I met my first wife.”

Per “The Coconut Monk” by John Steinbeck IV:

“I was happy here. Perhaps happier than I had ever been in my life. The island became my refuge for the next five years.”

——————– Roger Steffens, John Steinbeck IV, Crystal Eastin and Sean Flynn

— Gentleman Tim

 

Errol Flynn Personal Address Book!

03 Aug

— David DeWitt

 

Mail Bag! John Decker Death Certificate!

30 Jul

Special thanks to Robert Peckinpaugh for this rare item!

— David DeWitt