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Archive for the ‘Flynn as…’ Category

Mail Bag! Thomas McNulty: Remembrance of Heroes Errol Flynn

07 Oct

 

Hello David,
Here is some off-track trivia and random thoughts. All of these years later and Errol Flynn comes back to me in bits and pieces; rising from the depths of our cultural swamp with startling clarity. All of sudden there he is staring back at me from a stack of old Life magazines in some faraway antique shop; or grinning mischievously from some faded old movie magazine along with Roy Rogers and Trigger. I believe I own at least four copies of the famous Life magazine issue, last purchased at a flea market in June for five dollars and in perfect condition. I think of these images as “Lost America” which I’ve written about celebrating our remembrance of heroes and icons from yesteryear. I shouldn’t be surprised by this, although I am. A thousand years from now this image of Errol Flynn on horseback from Rocky Mountainwill no doubt find itself under scrutiny in some digital time-stream, lost in the nebulas of a galaxy swallowed by a black hole, perused by alien eyes, celebrated in song by the civilizations of our intergalactic future. This image has come to represent the iconic personification of the ideal Western hero. Of these images, my personal favorite is the Norman A. Fox paperback reprint by Dell in 1973, a fine novel that Fox reportedly wrote after meeting Audie Murphy on the set of Night Passage with James Stewart, based on Fox’s novel. Fox dedicated Rope the Wind to Audie Murphy who had encouraged Fox to write a novel that involved horses. Rope the Wind is a pretty damn good Western, too. They Called Him Calhoonis from the catalogue of Cleveland Westerns out of Australia, which strikes me as appropriate. Cleveland Westerns are the last pulp fiction Western digest magazines worldwide. The author, Brett McKinley, is a pseudonym for Paul Wheelahan, a prolific Australian author credited for writing hundreds of westerns for both Cleveland Publishing and Hale’s Black Horse Western imprint. There are more, but the Rocky Mountain image shows up constantly. I recently showed this still from Rocky Mountain to a young lass who shall remain nameless, and I asked her if she knew who this was and what did she think of the image? She squinted and pursed her lips, and finally said, “I don’t know who he is, but I wish there were men like him around today.” Need we say more?
Best wishes,
Tom

— David DeWitt

 

Introducing Errol Flynn

24 May

    Hollywood Citizen News – Behold Them Minus Hokum by Peter Pry – December 1, 1934

    Errol Flynn, newly arrived Irish actor, will have to call out the police reserves for protection
    when the local gals discover that he is independently wealthy and doesn’t need to act for a living.
    Flynn has lots of that appeal too, and is a husky specimen. He hewed a fortune out of a gold mine in
    New Guinea, he represented Ireland as a boxer in the Olympic games of 1928, he has braved cannibals,
    is 25, and has never been married! He has only been acting for two years. And he refused the role
    of Oberon in A Midsummer’s Night Dream because he didn’t want to start his film career by
    playing the king of the fairies.

    Los Angeles Evening Express – Harrison Carroll – December 3, 1934

    Actors making their debut in Hollywood usually proceed cautiously. Not so, Errol Flynn,
    the 25-year-old Irishman signed by Warner Brothers. In his biography charge, which all
    newcomers are asked to fill out, Flynn gave some answers that made the boys eyes pop out.
    For one thing, he listed actors as his pet aversion. And there were some hotter ones but
    we can’t go into them.

    Flynn is 6 feet 2, weighs 180 pounds and his hands are calloused. He is a descendant of
    Fletcher Christian , of the crew of the famous British ship, the Bounty. He was once a
    pearl fisherman and he made a good stake for himself prospecting for gold in the heart of
    New Guinea. In 1928, he represented Ireland in the boxing events of the Olympic Games.

    And his description of Douglas Fairbanks Jr. will get a chuckle out of Hollywood. Young Doug,
    he says, has dveloped an Oxford accent so thick that it is hard for even English people to
    understand him.

    Los Angeles Examiner – Lloyd Pantages – January 29, 1935

    Errol Flynn is not only a good looker, but a swell actor, so keep your eyes open for this gentleman.

    Los Angeles Evening Herald Express – Elizabeth Yeaman – February 5, 1935

    Despite the fact that Errol Flynn is an extremely handsome young Irishman and fairly bursting with
    personality, Warners have cast him as a murderer for his film debut here. He will be the villain in
    The Case of the Curious Bride, in which Warren Williams has the lead of the sleuthing attorney.

    Hollywood Citizen News – Elizabeth Yeaman – March 26, 1935

    Errol Flynn, the husky Irish actor at Warners, gets his second film assignment. He will be seen as a
    pirate with Robert Donat in Captain Blood. Now it is uncertain if Jean Muir will have the
    feminine lead.

    Tanikiu Tumas to King Karl Holmberg for the articles and Flynnspiration!

    — Gentleman Tim

     

Luke is In > In Like Flynn

20 May

In Luke Flynn:

Luke is in In Like Flynn, playing his “later-in-life” Grandfather Flynn.

www.timescolonist.com…

— Gentleman Tim

 

Errol’s Adventures of Robin Hood — 80th Anniversary —— May Day, 1937 —— The Stories Begin

03 May

An EFB Four Score Anniversary Production

The Adventures of Robin Hood – The Stories Begin

Published on May 1, 1937 – Perfect because of the May Day connections to the legend of Robin Hood.
Movie Released in May of 1938.

LOUELLA PARSONS – LOS ANGELES EXAMINER

How do you like the idea of the dashing young Errol Flynn as the adventurous Robin Hood?
We hope you do because you’re going to see him in one of his next pictures in the role,
of the legendary hero who stole from the rich that the poor might live. Interesting that
young Flynn, who has so often been called Douglas Fairbanks’ successor, should inherit one
of the most popular of the Fairbanks’ roles.

According to Jack Warner, who definitely settled on the Robin Hood idea just before he left
for New York, this will be an outdoor Technicolor special with an effective background for
Robin Hood’s romantic adventures. Since it is not a musical Reginald de Koven’s tuneful
operetta will not be included although Warners own the libretto by Harry Smith. Olivia
de Havilland, who has made her most successful pictures with Flynn, will be his starring
partner with Patric Knowles in a featured role.

— Gentleman Tim

 

The Gamblers!

30 Apr

An EFB Four Score News Report:

Wouldn’t this have been wunderbar!

Dostoyevsky: Directed by Max Reinhardt! Starring Errol Flynn, Bette Davis, Edward G. Robinson and Basil Rathbone!!!!

A LITTLE FROM LOTS
Film Daily – Ralph Wilk – April 30, 1947

Feodor Dostoievsky’s celebrated novel, The Gamblers will be directed for Warners by Max Reinhardt with a stellar cast including Edward G. Robinson, Bette Davis, Errol Flynn, and Basil Rathbone.

Louella O. Parsons
Los Angeles Examiner – May 3, 1937

You can’t blame Warners for becoming enthused over Edward G. Robinson all over again since the previews of Kid Gallahad, for Eddie is really swell! There’s not going to be any letdown either, for now he is scheduled for Max Reinhart’s The Gamblers, and what a cast they are recruiting for Dostoievsky’s famous novel, with Eddie, Errol Flynn, Bette Davis and Basil Rathbone heading the list! Milton Krims, who scripted Green Light, and Harold Heinz arecollaborating on the screen play that unites almost every big star on the Warner lot. It goes into production in a few weeks and precede’s Flynn’s
Robin Hood.

Here’s a lushly produced version from 1977:
What roles do you think Errol, Bette, Edward G., and Dear Baz would have played in the Max Reinhart version?

And here’s a loose adaptation of the novel(la) from MGM, titled “The Great Sinner”, with Gregory Peck and a stunningly gorgeous Ava Gardner, leading a cast of acting legends, including Ethel Barrymore, Melvin Douglas, Walter Huston, Agnes Moorehead, and Frank Morgan.

— Gentleman Tim

 

The Buccaneer?

01 Mar

We here all know Flynn was by far the best buccaneer in cinematic history. But he was always a Brit in one form or another, right? Here in New Orleans, however, the most “heroic” or at least heralded real-life buccaneer of all was the anti-Brit Jean LaFitte. How do you think Flynn would have fit and fared in the role of The Buccaneer, Jean LaFitte?

“The Buccaneer [was] a 1938 American adventure film made by Paramount Pictures based on Jean Lafitte and the Battle of New Orleans during the War of 1812. It was produced and directed by Cecil B. DeMille.”

“The film stars Fredric March as Lafitte, Franciska Gaal and Akim Tamiroff with Margot Grahame, Walter Brennan, Ian Keith, Spring Byington, Douglass Dumbrille, Beulah Bondi and Anthony Quinn in supporting roles.” This, therefore, would have “reunited” Errol with “I Adore You” Margot Grahame, paired him with Hungarian star Francisca Gaal (fresh off her noted role as “Lilli”, and had his radio producer, silver screen great, Cecil B. DeMille, producing him for the first and only time on film.

“Cecil B. DeMille remade the film in 1958 in Technicolor and VistaVision with the same title, but because of ill health, he allowed Henry Wilcoxon, his longtime friend and associate, to produce it, and the film was directed by Anthony Quinn, who was his son-in-law at the time. DeMille received no screen credit, but did make a personal appearance in the prologue to the film, much as he did in The Ten Commandments. The 1958 version of The Buccaneer stars Yul Brynner, Charles Boyer and Claire Bloom, with Charlton Heston as Andrew Jackson. Douglass Dumbrille appeared in both versions and Quinn acted in the earlier version.”

I have not found clips from the 1938 version with the always excellent Fredric Marsh, but here’s a photo, followed by a terrific trailer, in ’58, featuring Ceci B. DeMille and Yul. Yul agree, I believe, that Flynn would have been better than Brynner.

**********

In the French Quarter footsteps of Flynn, can be found the following relevant sites, all along Bourbon Street:

“Jean LaFitte’s Blacksmith Shop”, a front for his piratical activities.

savingplaces.org…

And here, upstairs, is where LaFitte is said to have planned the Battle of New Orleans, in 1812 (and where, during WWII, Errol was also in a bit of a battle himself, when this building, downstairs, was known as the Old Absinthe House.

Flynn @ the Old Absinthe House

The second and third photos below of a 19th Century painting of the Battle of 1812 in the original planning room upstairs, and a wooden model of LaFitte’s lead ship, carved by one of the pirates from that ship.

— Gentleman Tim

 

“In the wake of the bounty” 1933

13 Jan

From TROVE Digitised Newspapers, National Library of Australia

Brisbane Courier Mail        23/03/1932

 

Mr Charles Chauvel who produced “The Moth of Moonbi” and “Greenhide,” in Queensland some year ago, is to produce a series of films for Expeditionary Films Ltd., a Sydney company. Mr Chauvel, accompanied by his wife Elsa, and a camera staff, will travel far from the beaten track in search of cinema material. Adventure and romance are to predominate in the films, to be produced by this company.

Besides a feature film, Mr. Chauvel will make a series of historical and travel films.  These will be recorded with German and French dialogue as well, as English.   Mr Chauvel will commence production next month at the studio of Australasian Films, Bondi, Sydney.

 

 

Sydney Morning Herald        23/08/1932

 

MUTINY OF THE BOUNTY –  Reconstructed for Films.   Mr. Charles Chauvel returned to Sydney on

Saturday, after travelling 15,000 miles in little known parts of the Pacific Ocean, to make a film depicting the mutiny of the Bounty for Expeditionary Films, Ltd., an Australian company.  Every effort has been made to produce the film historically, and present a faithful picture of the wanderings of the mutineers, before they reached Pitcairn Island, where they burned the Bounty,

 

And Lieutenant Bligh’s epic voyage of 4000 miles, in an open boat to Batavia, after he had been cast adrift with l8 loyal members of his crew.  Mr. Chauvel followed the route of the Bounty and saw the remains of the ship lying in the clear water at Pitcairn Island.  Native dances were filmed at Tahiti, where the mutineers stayed. Natives had to be specially chosen, as knowledge of primitive dances Is rapidly dying out.

Members of the party had an unpleasant experience at Pitcairn Island. They were Inspecting the coast in an open boat, when the engine failed, and they were blown out to sea.  They managed to make repairs just before sunset, and made a dangerous return to the Island through the surf, which is always heavy.

Mr. Chauvel said that his company believed that Australian history was too much neglected, and attempts would be made to fill in the gaps.  Arrangements have been made for copies of the film to be prepared with Spanish and German comment.

 

Sydney Morning Herald     15/03/1933

EXPEDITIONARY FILMS LTD.  “BOUNTY” PICTURE LAUNCHED !!

 

To-day, at the Prince Edward Theatre, the film, “In the Wake of the Bounty,”  which Mr. Charles Chauvel produced recently, with Tahiti and Pitcairn Islands as the principal backgrounds, will be given its first public screenings.

At the Australia Hotel yesterday, the directors of Expeditionary Films Ltd., under whose auspices Mr. Chauvel has made the film, entertained members of the Press and the motion picture Industry at luncheon.

Mr. S. Utz (Chairman of Expeditionary Films, Ltd.) presided.  COL. M. P. Bruxner, who is a member of the company, outlined some of the difficulties which Mr. Chauvel had had to face In making the film;  difficulties of transport; difficulties of organisation; and, finally, difficulties of censorship. The members of the company, being amateurs in the film business, had been amazed, and then appalled, at the amount of obstinacy and pugnacity which had to be displayed, before a film finally reached its public.

 

Mr. C. Brunsdon Fletcher spoke of the essential soundness and solidarity of the British Empire, in a world where every other nation was reeling beneath the shock of disaster (the depression).  After all, it was human character, as expressed in national outlook, which remained the predominating factor.  The producers of this film had done something decisive and valuable to make their country known elsewhere.

Mr. Hec C. MacIntyre (Managing Director of Universal Films – Aust) said that his Company considered it was only doing Its duty in trying to establish Australian films abroad. The launching of the Australian product In England, was no easy matter, either.  The English exhibitor was conservative. He preferred to concentrate on English and American productions.  Some of the earlier Australian films had been extraordinarily difficult to market. In Mr. Chauvel’s picture, however, he was confident that he had something to appeal to the tastes of the whole world.

Mr. H. Saxton (Secretary of Expeditionary Films) also spoke.

 

The West Australian        1 December, 1933

 

IN THE WAKE OFfHE BOUNTY              New Australian Production.

 

Travelogues and dramas have drenched the screen- with the- spray of South Sea beaches until the film-goer imagines that he knows every angle from which a palm can be photographed. Then an Australian, Mr. Charles Chauvel,. makes ‘In the Wake of the Bounty,’ and presents the Pacific under a strange and cloudy beauty, such as has not been filmed.  Mr. Chauvel, however, is more concerned with the savage languor of the tropics; he masses the brilliance of wild dances and flowers to show the pathetic contrast between the islands, which link that famous mutiny, Tahiti and Pitcairn, writes the Film Editor of the Sydney ‘Sun.’

Thus that first part of the. film is a glamorous reconstruction of history, with young Errol Flynn playing the part of Fletcher Christian – Mayne Lynton that of Bligh, and Victor Gouriet that of the blind fiddler, who tells the tale.  The scenes aboard ship are effectively done; then, by filming the journey made down the

Pacific by the Chauvels themselves, Pitcairn comes into view and the title of the picture falls into its proper pace.

 

The latter sequences of the film admirably bear out the intention of the producers (Expeditionary Films, Ltd.) to chart the unknown tracts of the world.  Pitcairn, of which the serious and religious people, appalling surf and precipices, prim houses and vegetable patches, are shown in absorbing detail, is one of those places which, as the steamer route moves farther out, will be less frequently visited.

Drama as well as travel has been caught by the film; human romances, swift tragedies, interludes as exciting as any fiction, all enthral the audience.

‘In the Wake of. the Bounty’ will be shown at the Theatre Royal in December, with ‘Leave it to Me’ (Gene Gerrard).

 

“In the wake of the Bounty” 1933 (24)

 

Australian Screen Site

Errol Flynn

Photo of Errol Flynn 1933

As a cast member:   Errol Flynn as Fletcher Christian 1933

In the Wake of the Bounty (1933)

This list shows all the titles currently on australianscreen , that include Errol Flynn in a principal role.  It is not a comprehensive screen-o-graphy.

Singleton Argus           30/01/1933

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NEW SOUTH SEAS FILM – CENSOR OBJECTS TO DANCE SCENES.

– SUPERVISED BY CLERGYMAN.

 

The South Seas film “In the Wake of the Bounty,”  which the Commonwealth Censor  (Mr Creswell O’Reilly) insists must be submitted for certain cuts, will be placed before the Censorship Appeal Board by the’ producer, Mr Charles Chauvel who said that the dance scenes to which Mr. O;Reilly had objected, had been supervised in the making, by a Methodist clergyman.

 

Sydney Morning Herald       11/02/1933

 

Top of Form

THE “BOUNTY” FILM.                         Appeal to Minister for Customs.

 

Mr. Charles Chauvel, who directed “In the Wake of the Bounty,” staled last night that the Censorship Appeal Board had considered the film, and announced its decision.  When the sections of the picture photographed in Tahiti came before the Commonwealth Film Censor (Mr. O’Reilly) recently. ? he ordered three excisions before the film could be publicly screened within Australia.  He also ordered that a cut should be made In the section photographed within the Commonwealth, before the completed film could be exported lo other countries.  The Appeal Board passed every part of the production except

one set of incidents which relate to a native dance.

Mr. Chauvel declares that he and his Board ol Directors intend to carry their case from the Appeal Board to the Minister for Customs.  They feel, he says, that their film has been unfairly chosen  for attack, while foreign productions embodying the same type of incident, have been allowed admission to this country, without comment.

If the Minister fails to reverse the decision of the Appeal Board”, he goes on, “In the Wake of the Bounty” will not be screened in Australia.  Its’ owners will simply send it abroad, and concentrate on the oversea market  The scenes of the native dance are the pivot of the whole production.  If they are deleted, the film will be spoilt.”

 

National Screen Archives

 

Title No: 496
Title: IN THE WAKE OF THE BOUNTY : ORIGINAL RELEASE.    Country of Origin:  Australia
Production Date: 1932    Media: Film
Release Date: 15 March 1933    Duration:   01:04:00
Produced as: Feature Film    Category: DramaCast:    Marie Rosenfeld, Errol Flynn, Mayne Linton
Cinematographer/Director:  Tasman Higgins

Director:    Charles Chauvel

Company:  Expeditionary Films

Summary:  Retells the story of the mutiny led by Fletcher Christian in 1789 against William Bligh, depicting the fate of the mutineers on Tahiti and Pitcairn. — General notes: Shot on location and in Sydney. The wreckage in the film portrayed as that of ‘The Bounty’ is in fact that of ‘The Cornwallis’, which was wrecked in 1875. — Source:   Queensland Maritime Museum.

In 1935, M.G.M. bought American rights to the film and re-edited it to form two short travelogues, ‘Pitcairn Island Today’ (1935) and ‘Primitive Pitcairn’ (1936). These were used as promotional aids for the studio’s own production of ‘Mutiny on the Bounty’.

Source: Australian Film 1900-1977, Andrew Pike and Ross Cooper.

 

 

— Isabel Australis

 

Just A Nice Photo

05 Jan

— twinarchers

 

Passed in 2016 …

02 Jan

Did I miss it or did no one report on the fact that 2 Flynn alumni, from his very last dramatic appearance (The Golden Shanty), passed last year:

Patricia Barry (Adie Walker)

Arthur Hiller (Director) below with Errol.

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— Karl

 

Ahead of His Time

13 Sep

Errol was always ahead of his time. In this case, eighty (80) years so.

If not for his allegedly annoying moustache and smile, the movie may well have been his in ’36!

cilisos.my/hollywood-is-filming-a-malaysian-movie-guess-who-its-about-no-its-not-najib/…

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— Gentleman Tim