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Archive for the ‘Films’ Category

More On In Like Flynn

28 Jun

See photo of “Errol” on the “Sirocco” from Luke’s In Like Flynn.

www.redlandcitybulletin.com…

Summary below is extracted and adapted from the above-linked article by Cheryl Goodenough.

“The movie stars Australian actor Thomas Cocquerel, from Red Dog: True Blue and Kidnapping Mr Heineken, as Errol Flynn.

It is being co-produced by Flynn’s 41-year-old actor, writer and producer grandson Luke Flynn.

A 100-person film crew set up at Cleveland’s Raby Bay to shoot In Like Flynn.

Directing In Like Flynn is Australian Russell Mulcahy of Highlander, Teen Wolf and Resident Evil: Extinction fame.

Mr Mulcahy said the film was taking full advantage of Moreton Bay at its best.

“The first time I came here on the location survey to Cleveland, I fell in love with it,” he said.

“It’s perfect – it’s exactly what we need.

“How could any director not enjoy this part of the world? It is stunningly beautiful, from sunrise over the water to sunset.”

In June 2015, Pirates of the Caribbean star Johnny Depp put Cleveland on the filming map.

Redland City is fast earning a reputation within Queensland, Australia and overseas as a great place to make great television and movies.

The city was recently recognised at the premiere of Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales on the Gold Coastfor its welcoming community, film-friendly council and its spectacular water-based locations.

Scenes from Flynn’s exploits in Papua New Guinea were shot in the Mount Tamborine area.

Set in the 1930s, In Like Flynn tells the story of Flynn in his twenties when he discovered a map on a dead prospector while serving as a guide for a Hollywood producer in the jungles of Papua New Guinea.

In Sydney, Flynn rounds up a crew, who steal Sirocco, a yacht belonging to Chinese opium smugglers and they voyage up the Australian east coast.

Mr Mulcahy said In Like Flynn was an “honest seat of your pants true life action adventure about a group of guys lead by Flynn, who barely make it through some incredible situations”.”

— Gentleman Tim

 

Green Light for Errol & Olivia

03 Jun

Louella O. Parsons – Los Angeles Examiner
June 1, 1936

One of the directorial plums of the year has fallen right
into the lap of Frank Borzage. He will direct The Green Light
by Lloyd C. Douglas, author of The Magnificent Obsession,
which was one of last year’s big pictures. The production date
is July 6, so, of course, Warner Brothers won’t wait for
Leslie Howard, who remains in England for months and months.
But my guess is that Errol Flynn,who is being built bigger
and bigger by Warners, will have the lead.

Jimmy Starr – Los Angeles Evening Herald Express
June 2, 1936

…Tremendously enthusiastic over the forthcoming
production of Green Light, the Lloyd C. Douglas novel,
Cosmopolitan Productions, releasing through Warner Brothers,
has decided to again team those new raves, Olivia De Havilland
and Errol Flynn, under the direction of Frank Borzage. This
will be Errol’s first chance to appear in modern dress since
his sensational rise to cinematic fame. He will star in his
own story, The White Rajah, following this picture.

They never made it to the Silver Screen with Green Light, but it was blue skies on radio airwaves with this:

“From Hollywood California, the Lux Radio Theater Presents Errol Flynn and Olivia DeHavilland in Green Light” oldhollywoodincolor.com…

— Gentleman Tim

 

Errol Saves England (Again) — Eighty Years Ago

15 May

An EFB Four Score News Report: The Anniversary of The Prince and the Pauper

Louella O. Parsons – Extract from the Los Angeles Illustrated Daily News – May 12, 1937

“Miles Herndon, dashing soldier of fortune, delivers the rightful prince.
Warners are indeed fortunate in having Errol Flynn in the family to play Herndon.
Where I ask you, is there a more suitable actor for a role that calls for
a handsome devil-may-care adventurer? Errol may have had bigger roles, but
never one that suited him better.”

Elizabeth Yeaman – Extract from the Hollywood Citizen News – May 13, 1937

With the coronation in England dominating the headlines for days, nothing
could have been more timely than Warners’ film version of The Prince and
the Pauper, which is climaxed by an elaborate coronation sequence.

Harrison Carrol – Extract from the Los Angeles Evening Herald Express – May 13, 1937

If Mark Twain had been alive today and had written The Prince and the Pauper
under Hollywood assignment, he could not have turned out a more perfect screen
story for this coronation year and for two extraordinary child actors, Billy
and Bobby Mauch.

In its spectacular and veracious coronation scenes this is as timely a picture
as could be asked.

It is Errol Flynn, playing a good natured soldier of fortune, who takes the young prince under his wing – not the least believing his story – and finally clears the way for a nick-of-time restoration of the royal youth, just as the unwilling beggar boy is about to be crowned king of England. In the role, Flynn is a dashing figure.

Warners have made the coronation ceremony one of the year’s spectacular screen episodes.

The Prince and the Pauper is an excitingly narrated, handsomely prodeuced, finely acted picture – an artistic achievement for producer Hal B. Wallis and all concerned – and a box-office natural.

Heading the supporting bill is a color short, A Day at Santa Anita.

Flynn saves England!

Just in time for the Coronation!

— Gentleman Tim

 

Another Bite of the Big Apple

10 May

For Fans of Flynn who can make it to Manhattan over the next several months, there’s at least two events worth attending. There’s the Errol & Fidel musical (in July) that David recently made known to us. But, first, there’s The Adventures of Robin Hood at the Film Forum on May 10. Both look to be Flynnsational:

Screening information is as follows:

“THE ADVENTURES OF ROBIN HOOD”(1938)
Saturday, May 20 – Film Forum, 209 W. Houston Street in New York City
Co-presented by Film Forum, featuring special guests Ben Burtt & Craig Barron

Join Oscar®-winning visual effects supervisor Craig Barron and Oscar-winning sound designer Ben Burtt as they deconstruct the extraordinary artistry behind “The Adventures of Robin Hood,” with a special emphasis on matte painting and sound effects, including a recreation of the archery tests that went into finding that just right “zing” sound.

www.oscars.org…

mobile.nytimes.com…

— Gentleman Tim

 

Seventy Years Ago —— Silver River/Sheila Graham

09 May

SHEILA GRAHAM – Hollywood Citizen News – May 8, 1947

I was on the set when Errol Flynn knocked out Barton MacLane
for a scene in Silver River. I’ve often been told the
story of the star who punched too soon, and the guy who forgot
to duck, and never believed it. But this I saw. Poor Errol.
It really hurt him more than MacLane. “It was the first time in
12 years,” he assured me, “that a punch of mine ever connected.”
Barton, of course, is used to movie risks because he’s usually
cast as a heavy. In the old days when a punch connected with his
jaw, he’d fight back, when he came to. Now he writes it off as an
occupational hazard.

Here’s what is reportedly the only known photo of the literary Garden of Allah gal,
Sheila Graham, and her over-the-hill beau, F. Scott Fitzgerald – on Revolution Boulevard in Tijuana!
Fitzgerald used to get angry and drunk at the thought Errol might possibly flirt with Sheila,
by far the best looking of what she called the “unholy trio” of Hollywood gossip columnists-
her, Hedda and Louella.

Below is Flynn vs. MacLane, preceding Errol’s knock out punch.

— Gentleman Tim

 

IN LIKE FLYNN BEGINS!!!

04 May

PER THE IMBd: This biopic depicts Errol’s roust-about early life in Australia, before he became an internationally famed celebrity. In those days he was an adventurer, opium smuggler, gambler, street fighter, womanizer, and gold prospector. The film, based on Flynn’s early autobiography “Beam Ends,” was written for the screen by Luke Flynn, who found the inspiration as a result of travels through Australia in the footsteps of Luke’s iconic grandfather.

__________

Characters beyond Errol’s days of Beam Ends have been previously mentioned also, including Olivia De Havilland and Michael Curtiz. See, for example this previous IMBd cast of characters:

m.imdb.com…

And a possible “former wife” featured in this new article:

www.dailytelegraph.com…

Starring Thomas Cocquerel & Isabel Lucas

— Gentleman Tim

 

News from New Zealand

26 Apr

Errol helps save south South Island from broken bottles, monkey parades, idle, dissolute and aimlessly wandering youths.

from THE SOUTHLAND TIMES (April 2017)

“Movie Screening”

“The first Sunday movie screening in Invercargill was in February 1910 when there was a “cinematograph entertainment” on a Sunday to aid the hospital fund.

After lying low for many years the issue arose again in 1961.

The arguments were predictable. Most churches waved their arms in horror at the thought that a day of rumination and self-flagellation should be polluted with entertainment, yet the dissolute youths of the town needed films of good character to stop them breaking bottles.

GC Tapper told the council committee investigating the question, “Although not enthusiastic about picture theatres being open on Sundays I now hold the view that something must be done about the idle youths wandering aimlessly about the streets on Sunday evenings and a six month trial with suitable films is now definitely called for.”

The Baptist Union said, “We consider that it is a violation of the sacredness of the Lord’s Day upon which our Christian community is based. We do not believe that there is any evidence of a real need for this because, from observation, there has not been seen any large groups of young people aimlessly wandering our streets on a Sunday night.”

The Catholic Church said, “There is no objection to the screening of films on Sundays. Once our people have fulfilled their obligation of worshipping God on Sundays, they may take part in any form of lawful recreation.”

Another submitter said, “If the opening of cinemas on Sunday evenings would reduce monkey parading, why does it not do so on Saturday evenings or Bank holidays when they are open. Furthermore, increasing facilities for Sunday sports, and the official recognition and sanction of them, have already drawn thousands of young people from the church services and robbed the Sunday Schools of their teachers.”

The Master of Ballantrae, a movie of an improving nature, was screened on Sunday, March 12, 1961. The Master of Ballantrae was a 1953 British Technicolorfilm starring Errol Flynn. It was an adaptation of Robert Louis Stevenson’s famous novel of the same name.”

— Gentleman Tim

 

Case of the Curious Corpse

12 Feb

i.ytimg.com…

— Gentleman Tim

 

“In the wake of the bounty” 1933

13 Jan

From TROVE Digitised Newspapers, National Library of Australia

Brisbane Courier Mail        23/03/1932

 

Mr Charles Chauvel who produced “The Moth of Moonbi” and “Greenhide,” in Queensland some year ago, is to produce a series of films for Expeditionary Films Ltd., a Sydney company. Mr Chauvel, accompanied by his wife Elsa, and a camera staff, will travel far from the beaten track in search of cinema material. Adventure and romance are to predominate in the films, to be produced by this company.

Besides a feature film, Mr. Chauvel will make a series of historical and travel films.  These will be recorded with German and French dialogue as well, as English.   Mr Chauvel will commence production next month at the studio of Australasian Films, Bondi, Sydney.

 

 

Sydney Morning Herald        23/08/1932

 

MUTINY OF THE BOUNTY –  Reconstructed for Films.   Mr. Charles Chauvel returned to Sydney on

Saturday, after travelling 15,000 miles in little known parts of the Pacific Ocean, to make a film depicting the mutiny of the Bounty for Expeditionary Films, Ltd., an Australian company.  Every effort has been made to produce the film historically, and present a faithful picture of the wanderings of the mutineers, before they reached Pitcairn Island, where they burned the Bounty,

 

And Lieutenant Bligh’s epic voyage of 4000 miles, in an open boat to Batavia, after he had been cast adrift with l8 loyal members of his crew.  Mr. Chauvel followed the route of the Bounty and saw the remains of the ship lying in the clear water at Pitcairn Island.  Native dances were filmed at Tahiti, where the mutineers stayed. Natives had to be specially chosen, as knowledge of primitive dances Is rapidly dying out.

Members of the party had an unpleasant experience at Pitcairn Island. They were Inspecting the coast in an open boat, when the engine failed, and they were blown out to sea.  They managed to make repairs just before sunset, and made a dangerous return to the Island through the surf, which is always heavy.

Mr. Chauvel said that his company believed that Australian history was too much neglected, and attempts would be made to fill in the gaps.  Arrangements have been made for copies of the film to be prepared with Spanish and German comment.

 

Sydney Morning Herald     15/03/1933

EXPEDITIONARY FILMS LTD.  “BOUNTY” PICTURE LAUNCHED !!

 

To-day, at the Prince Edward Theatre, the film, “In the Wake of the Bounty,”  which Mr. Charles Chauvel produced recently, with Tahiti and Pitcairn Islands as the principal backgrounds, will be given its first public screenings.

At the Australia Hotel yesterday, the directors of Expeditionary Films Ltd., under whose auspices Mr. Chauvel has made the film, entertained members of the Press and the motion picture Industry at luncheon.

Mr. S. Utz (Chairman of Expeditionary Films, Ltd.) presided.  COL. M. P. Bruxner, who is a member of the company, outlined some of the difficulties which Mr. Chauvel had had to face In making the film;  difficulties of transport; difficulties of organisation; and, finally, difficulties of censorship. The members of the company, being amateurs in the film business, had been amazed, and then appalled, at the amount of obstinacy and pugnacity which had to be displayed, before a film finally reached its public.

 

Mr. C. Brunsdon Fletcher spoke of the essential soundness and solidarity of the British Empire, in a world where every other nation was reeling beneath the shock of disaster (the depression).  After all, it was human character, as expressed in national outlook, which remained the predominating factor.  The producers of this film had done something decisive and valuable to make their country known elsewhere.

Mr. Hec C. MacIntyre (Managing Director of Universal Films – Aust) said that his Company considered it was only doing Its duty in trying to establish Australian films abroad. The launching of the Australian product In England, was no easy matter, either.  The English exhibitor was conservative. He preferred to concentrate on English and American productions.  Some of the earlier Australian films had been extraordinarily difficult to market. In Mr. Chauvel’s picture, however, he was confident that he had something to appeal to the tastes of the whole world.

Mr. H. Saxton (Secretary of Expeditionary Films) also spoke.

 

The West Australian        1 December, 1933

 

IN THE WAKE OFfHE BOUNTY              New Australian Production.

 

Travelogues and dramas have drenched the screen- with the- spray of South Sea beaches until the film-goer imagines that he knows every angle from which a palm can be photographed. Then an Australian, Mr. Charles Chauvel,. makes ‘In the Wake of the Bounty,’ and presents the Pacific under a strange and cloudy beauty, such as has not been filmed.  Mr. Chauvel, however, is more concerned with the savage languor of the tropics; he masses the brilliance of wild dances and flowers to show the pathetic contrast between the islands, which link that famous mutiny, Tahiti and Pitcairn, writes the Film Editor of the Sydney ‘Sun.’

Thus that first part of the. film is a glamorous reconstruction of history, with young Errol Flynn playing the part of Fletcher Christian – Mayne Lynton that of Bligh, and Victor Gouriet that of the blind fiddler, who tells the tale.  The scenes aboard ship are effectively done; then, by filming the journey made down the

Pacific by the Chauvels themselves, Pitcairn comes into view and the title of the picture falls into its proper pace.

 

The latter sequences of the film admirably bear out the intention of the producers (Expeditionary Films, Ltd.) to chart the unknown tracts of the world.  Pitcairn, of which the serious and religious people, appalling surf and precipices, prim houses and vegetable patches, are shown in absorbing detail, is one of those places which, as the steamer route moves farther out, will be less frequently visited.

Drama as well as travel has been caught by the film; human romances, swift tragedies, interludes as exciting as any fiction, all enthral the audience.

‘In the Wake of. the Bounty’ will be shown at the Theatre Royal in December, with ‘Leave it to Me’ (Gene Gerrard).

 

“In the wake of the Bounty” 1933 (24)

 

Australian Screen Site

Errol Flynn

Photo of Errol Flynn 1933

As a cast member:   Errol Flynn as Fletcher Christian 1933

In the Wake of the Bounty (1933)

This list shows all the titles currently on australianscreen , that include Errol Flynn in a principal role.  It is not a comprehensive screen-o-graphy.

Singleton Argus           30/01/1933

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NEW SOUTH SEAS FILM – CENSOR OBJECTS TO DANCE SCENES.

– SUPERVISED BY CLERGYMAN.

 

The South Seas film “In the Wake of the Bounty,”  which the Commonwealth Censor  (Mr Creswell O’Reilly) insists must be submitted for certain cuts, will be placed before the Censorship Appeal Board by the’ producer, Mr Charles Chauvel who said that the dance scenes to which Mr. O;Reilly had objected, had been supervised in the making, by a Methodist clergyman.

 

Sydney Morning Herald       11/02/1933

 

Top of Form

THE “BOUNTY” FILM.                         Appeal to Minister for Customs.

 

Mr. Charles Chauvel, who directed “In the Wake of the Bounty,” staled last night that the Censorship Appeal Board had considered the film, and announced its decision.  When the sections of the picture photographed in Tahiti came before the Commonwealth Film Censor (Mr. O’Reilly) recently. ? he ordered three excisions before the film could be publicly screened within Australia.  He also ordered that a cut should be made In the section photographed within the Commonwealth, before the completed film could be exported lo other countries.  The Appeal Board passed every part of the production except

one set of incidents which relate to a native dance.

Mr. Chauvel declares that he and his Board ol Directors intend to carry their case from the Appeal Board to the Minister for Customs.  They feel, he says, that their film has been unfairly chosen  for attack, while foreign productions embodying the same type of incident, have been allowed admission to this country, without comment.

If the Minister fails to reverse the decision of the Appeal Board”, he goes on, “In the Wake of the Bounty” will not be screened in Australia.  Its’ owners will simply send it abroad, and concentrate on the oversea market  The scenes of the native dance are the pivot of the whole production.  If they are deleted, the film will be spoilt.”

 

National Screen Archives

 

Title No: 496
Title: IN THE WAKE OF THE BOUNTY : ORIGINAL RELEASE.    Country of Origin:  Australia
Production Date: 1932    Media: Film
Release Date: 15 March 1933    Duration:   01:04:00
Produced as: Feature Film    Category: DramaCast:    Marie Rosenfeld, Errol Flynn, Mayne Linton
Cinematographer/Director:  Tasman Higgins

Director:    Charles Chauvel

Company:  Expeditionary Films

Summary:  Retells the story of the mutiny led by Fletcher Christian in 1789 against William Bligh, depicting the fate of the mutineers on Tahiti and Pitcairn. — General notes: Shot on location and in Sydney. The wreckage in the film portrayed as that of ‘The Bounty’ is in fact that of ‘The Cornwallis’, which was wrecked in 1875. — Source:   Queensland Maritime Museum.

In 1935, M.G.M. bought American rights to the film and re-edited it to form two short travelogues, ‘Pitcairn Island Today’ (1935) and ‘Primitive Pitcairn’ (1936). These were used as promotional aids for the studio’s own production of ‘Mutiny on the Bounty’.

Source: Australian Film 1900-1977, Andrew Pike and Ross Cooper.

 

 

— Isabel Australis

 

In a Galaxy Far, Far Away

29 Dec

Tammy, Tammy, Tammy is gone.

How terribly, terribly sad. One of the last true greats from Hollywood’s Golden Age has died, only a day after her daughter, also a film legend.

Around the time of her playing Tammy, there was discussion of Debbie Reynolds costarring with Errol, following his own great success in The Sun Also Rises. This was all circa the time Liz ran off with the Louse, leaving the unsinkable Debbie with two Fisher toddlers, Todd and Carrie. Carrie, of course, achieved immortality of her own starring in Star Wars with spacebuckler Hans Solo, a character inspired by Errol himself. Except for Harrison, they are all now in a galaxy far, far away. Godspeed to all of them.

— Gentleman Tim