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Archive for the ‘Films’ Category

Jan van der Vliet notices Errol Says MARVELOUS!

13 Feb

Jan says in the Adventures of Robin Hood, he notices Errol says MARVELOUS! And notes this is a word stemming from the 1300’s and not from 100 years or so previously (Robin Hood is said to have been born in 1160 …) And the word did not mean “splendid, very nice” (beginning in 1924 onward) but meant “causing wonder” as in a miraculous event. I am sure there are many other incidents like this in other films where the language used did not exist, but is used, and this one is caught by the eagle “ear” of our own Jan van der Vliet!

— David DeWitt

 

Robin Hood Hat! And Rory Flynn!

10 Feb

Rory Flynn showed me a hat that her father had given to her from the film Robin Hood, and has told me that the costume department had made two of them. Errol gave one to her and her sister, Deirdre, and Rory still has hers. Sitting on the couch in her office area at her home in North Carolina, she brought it out and let me try it on … The feather is long gone, but the hat fit us both! Here it is on Flynn’s head in this great looking candid …

— David DeWitt

 
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Posted in Candids, Films

 

Don Juan Flynn & Nice Candid!

09 Feb

— David DeWitt

 

A Classical Quiz

19 Jan

What classical music is used for a theme in the first official U. S. trailer for “In Like Flynn” ?

Classical Clues:

It’s one of the most recognizable musical masterpieces in the world.

The composer was very famous in his own lifetime.

This particular composition of his, however, was not published until forty years after his death.

— Gentleman Tim

 

A Gift of a Christmas Quiz

23 Dec

In what major motion picture did Errol not kiss, chase, or flirt with a leading lady or any other woman?

Clues:

Included one of Errol’s greatest co-stars, as well as one of his greatest friends, too.

Released for the Christmas season.

The Baron vs. The Baron

Set in France

——-

Images below added Christmas Eve morning (at dawn):

On the second day of Christmas
For on those it has not dawned

— Gentleman Tim

 

Dear Prudence

22 Dec

Dear Prudence,

A “more skillful swordsman” than Errol? I think not. Though you sure we’re one talented and rediantly-beautiful swashbucklerette, in both B&W and Technicolor.

“Against All Flags, 1952. This was one of the last Hollywood swashbucklers starring Errol Flynn. Maureen O’Hara proves his equal with her swordplay as Prudence “Spitfire” Stevens. In fact, O’Hara swore she was the more skillful swordsman, which might be true, as Flynn was slowing down. Usually he did his own stunts, but he declined the Douglas Fairbanks-style broad-sail-riding stunt here, having already broken an ankle and delaying production two months.

Fortunately for Universal Pictures, they had Russell Metty as cinematographer. He was the fastest Technicolor ace around, and he shot a second pirate movie, Yankee Buccaneer with Jeff Chandler, while Flynn recuperated. Co-star Anthony Quinn competes with Flynn in all sorts of skullduggery, supposedly on the island of Madagascar. The film’s secret weapon? Jokes that were purportedly inspired by Flynn’s randy sex life.”

www.santafenewmexican.com…

— Gentleman Tim

 

Friday the 13th, December 1935

14 Dec

BAKERSFIELD CALIFORNIAN

FLYNN. WIFE TO N. Y. HOLLYWOOD, Dec. 13 (A. P.)— Errol Flynn and his wife, Lily Damlta, French film star, were en route to New York today to attend the the premiere of his new starring picture, “Captain Blood.”

Captain Blood had its premiere on December 26, 1935 at the Mark Strand Theatre in New York City[18] and was released in the United States on December 28, 1935.”

www.nycago.org…

— Gentleman Tim

 

Pauper for a Princely Sum

03 Dec

Reported December 3, 1936

HOLLYWOOD CITIZEN NEWS
by ELIZABETH YEAMAN

The highly publicized reunion of Errol Flynn and Lili Damita and their departure for a “second honeymoon” in Europe may all be called off. That is to say, the trip to Europe may be canceled. Warner’s will decide today if they shall summon Flynn back to take the adult male lead in The Prince and the Pauper</em. This picture is growing daily in budget and production plans. Some enormous sets have been built, and the studio expects the film to be one of its most ambitious efforts. Now Bobby and Billy Mauch, the twin child stars, have the leads, but the are little known to the public and can't be regarded as a box office lure. Errol Flynn is well established with the fans, and while the role for him is of far less scope and importance than any he has been given in the past, it could be built up a little and his presence would insure a certain fan following. The point is, a picture which costs a lot of money needs some star with fan appeal to insure return on the money invested.

Ian Hunter was mentioned frequently for the role now pending for Flynn.

Reported December 14, 1936

by SHEILA GRAHAM

Errol Flynn demanded— and received— a $20,000 bonus for cutting short his European reconciliation trip with wife Lili Damita, returning instead to Hollywood for the leading role in the kiddie story, The Prince and the Pauper*

* A “kiddie story” beloved by adults around the globe.

BTW, I wonder if Errol ever read this advice from Mark Twain? I’d bet he did.

— Gentleman Tim

 

Northern Pursuit

16 Nov

SEVENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO THIS WEEK

From Under the Sea, to the Top of the World

— Gentleman Tim

 

The Hurricane

15 Nov

While it’s still hurricane season here in the U.S. …

LOS ANGELES EXAMINER – NOVEMBER 16, 1936

by LOUELLA O. PARSONS

Bargaining, I hear from a reliable authority, is going on between the Warner Brothers Studio and Samuel Goldwyn. Sam wants Errol Flynn for the lead in Hurricane and offers in exchange William Wyler, the director, and any other bit of property loose on the Goldwyn lot. First time I ever heard of a star being swapped for a director or vice versa. But Wyler is an ace director and is as valuable in his way as Flynn.

Not only has Sam set his heart on Flynn, but John Ford, who will direct for Goldwyn, also has the same idea. And talking about goofy trades, Ford agreed to direct Hurricane on condition that Sam buy him a boat and equipment to film exteriors in the South Seas where he is now vacationing. Margo, who is superb in Winterset, will probably get the lead opposite Flynn, with Basil Rathbone set for an important role.

COULD THIS HAVE BEEN A GREAT ONE OF FLYNN? I believe so. With Wyler directing and the film earning three Academy Awards, but ultimately hampered by the casting of Jon Hall. Errol, IMO, could have lifted this to a Hollywood classic.


Plus, there could have been some very good amour between Flynn and Lamour!

“The Hurricane is a 1937 film set in the South Seas, directed by John Ford and produced by Samuel Goldwyn Productions, about a Polynesian who is unjustly imprisoned. The climax features a special effects hurricane. It stars Dorothy Lamour and Jon Hall, with Mary Astor, C. Aubrey Smith, Thomas Mitchell, Raymond Massey, John Carradine, and Jerome Cowan. James Norman Hall, Jon Hall’s uncle, co-wrote the novel of the same name on which The Hurricane is based.”

The film was nominated for three Academy Awards, winning in the category for Best Sound.
Best Sound Recording – Thomas T. Moulton
Best Supporting Actor (nomination) – Thomas Mitchell
Best Music, Score (nomination) – Alfred Newman

New York Times critic Frank S. Nugent praised the climactic special effect created by James Basevi, stating, “It is a hurricane to blast you from the orchestra pit to the first mezzanine. It is a hurricane to film your eyes with spin-drift, to beat at your ears with its thunder, to clutch at your heart and send your diaphragm vaulting over your floating rib into the region just south of your tonsils.”

He complimented the performances of all of the principal actors with the exception of Hall, whose Terangi was described as “a competent Tarzan”. He also faulted the uneven pacing, but in the end, characterized the film as “one of the most thrilling spectacles the screen has provided this year.”

— Gentleman Tim