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Archive for the ‘Documentaries’ Category

The Ides of Flynn

15 Mar

Eighty-Five Years Ago Today (Sydney Time), on March 15, 1933, Errol Appeared Live AND On Film at the Prince Edward Theater in Sydney.

Errol was paid £2 to stand on stage in what he later described as a bad wig and bizarre naval uniform, appearing more like “an elderly keeper at a [Sydney brothel] than Fletcher Christian. The Ides of March ended bad for Caesar, but great for Flynn. It signaled the birth of Errol’s acting career.

A superb assembly of contemporaneous news articles by EFB Author “Isabel Australis”:

“In the wake of the bounty” 1933

An intriguing history with some Errol and errors:

books.google.com…

And here’s the cinematic Flynn himself, just as he appeared at the Prince Edward Theater, eighty-five years ago today, March 15, 1933 – On the Ides of Flynn:

— Gentleman Tim

 

Tribute to Tony Thomas

20 Feb

Reminded recently by Jack Marino of his friend, Tony Thomas’s, preeminent contributions to the history of Flynn here is a recollection of his great work:

THE FILMS OF ERROL FLYNN

“This book is a complete record of Errol Flynn’s career from his first starring role in Captain Blood until his untimely death at fifty. All of his 58 films are here, with synopses, casts & credits, reviews of the more important vehicles, and hundreds of photos.”

ERROL FLYNN:THE SPY WHO NEVER WAS

Author of 30 books about movies and movie stars, Thomas here defends Flynn (1909-1959) against the charge made by Charles Higham in Errol Flynn: The Untold Story (1979) that the Hollywood swashbuckler, who played Captain Blood, Robin Hood, the Earl of Essex and Don Juan, was a Nazi spy. Thomas’s detailed examination of Higham’s evidence (including interviews with many original sources) convincingly shows that Higham quoted documents selectively, twisted witnesses’ words and made a flawed case based on guilt by association.

— Gentleman Tim

 

Seventy Years Ago Safari

24 Nov

Seventy years ago – during, prior to, and following the Thanksgiving holidays of 1947 – Errol was planning a major hunting expedition.

With what other person did Errol plan this safari, and in what country was it to take place??

¤ They planned to include about thirty (30) people.

¤ It was planned to last for about two months.

¤ They planned to record, ship, and broadcast clips of the expedition.

¤ It would involve big game hunting.

¤ The safari was to begin immediately after completion of The Adventures of Don Juan.

¤ It never happened.

— Gentleman Tim

 

In Like Flynn Film

13 Oct

IMDB has this update so far. The only thing that bothers me is that they say the budget is only 10 Mil. Hope it turns out great.

www.imdb.com…

— twinarchers

 

Crews of The Zaca

05 Sep

I think it would be great to collect and publish names of Zaca crew members since the days of the legendary schooner’s first launch in Sausalito nearly ninety years ago.

It’s been reported that Templeton Crocker’s Zaca had up to eighteen crew members, including on his circumnavigation of the world, and his legendary scientific expeditions. This included his personal valet, a doctor, and a photographer. From photos, it appears the Navy appears to have had that amount or even more crew.

The number of crew on Zaca when Errol sailed her appears to have varied.

Nail polish millionaire, Freddie Tinsley, certainly must have had some crew at times, mostly only a skeletal crew for dockside entertainment. It’s unclear, however, how often he actually sailed The Zaca.

I am not certain if Joseph Rosenberg, Bernard Voisin or Phillip Coussins ever actually sailed Zaca.

Today’s Zaca – majestically restored and cared for by its current owner, Robert Memmo – has been said to day cruise out of Monaco with as few as four in its crew.

For the historical record, can anyone help name members of these various crews?
(Ahoy San Francisco Bay Area Marine Historians, Wallace Berry, WWII Navy Alumni Associations, Port Antonians, Bonny Cother, and Palma de Majorcans!!!)

1929 – 1942 – Templeton Crocker, San Francisco
1942 – 1945 – U.S. Navy – renamed “USS Zaca” “IX-73”, San Francisco
1945 – 1945 – War Shipping Administration
1945 – 1946 – Joseph Rosenberg, San Francisco
1946 – 1959 – Errol Flynn, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Jamaica, Mediterranean
1959 – 1965 – Freddie Tinsley, Palma de Mallorca to Villefranche Su Mer
1965 – 1990 – Bernard Voisin, Villefranche Su Mer
1990 – 1990 – Phillip Coussins, Villafranche Su Mer
1990 – 2017 – Robert Memmo, Monaco

LE “ZACA” DANS LE PORT DE FONTVIEILLE, MONACO.

Some of the crews can be seen in the videos below:

— Gentleman Tim

 

Pirate Party on Catalina Isle! First Appearance!

30 Aug

All Flynn followers are familiar with the brief appearance of Errol and Lily in Pirate Party on Catalina Island, but there was always a little confusion about when this quiet little short subject appeared. To help quell any more questions, here is a clip from the Los Angeles Times newspaper of Feb. 12, 1936, page 11.

 

It premiered with the Charlie Chaplin film Modern Times.

Enjoy,

 

— Ada Klock

 

Errol’s Rhodie Bites Father Hubbard’s Brother

30 May

cdnc.ucr.edu…

Father Hubbard-Alaska! (106)

— Gentleman Tim

 

Missing Linc

05 Mar

Sunday Morning Tribute to Flynn Fan and Scholar Extraordinaire, Lincoln Hurst

ldhursteulogy.blogspot.com…

en.wikipedia.org…

— Gentleman Tim

 

Sailfishing on the Zaca

10 Feb

“Cruising Down Mexico Way” with Errol Flynn and Howard Hill

— Gentleman Tim

 

Swordfishing on the Sirocco

10 Feb


Featuring Howard Hill and Ronald Reagan

“Swordfishing is not for the timid. This magnificent creature that lives 30 years
and can reach 1,200 lbs at 14 feet long lurks in the deep waters of the Gulf Stream
offering lucky anglers a brutal fight and trophy size fish. And they are excellent eating.
Once hooked this aggressive Billfish are known to shoot straight out of the water from
a depth of 500 feet in an instant then dive straight back down to the same depth offering
one of the most exciting catches of your life. The Swordfish is one of the fastest swimmers
— 60 mph sprints are very common.”

— Gentleman Tim