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Archive for the ‘Newspaper & Headlines’ Category

Errol is Irresistible — “Because He Keeps His Mouth Shut” 😃🤐

19 May

May 19, 1950

The Barrier Miner
Broken Hill, New South Wales

— Tim

 

Bonjour, Irene, Bonjour

18 May

May 17, 1950

Errol, Princess Ghica, Margaret Eddington and Marelle Flynn

— Tim

 

The Last Man

18 May

In an Avalanche of Adventure

May 18, 1943

Syracuse Herald Journal

FLYNN COLLAPSES ON HOLLYWOOD SET

Actor Errol Flynn was recovering today at Hollywood Hospital after collapsing on a Warner Bros. set.

he was expected to remain in the hospital for at least a week. His physicians, Dr. Carl F. Stevens and Thomas W. Hern, said Flynn suffered “a recurrence of an upper respiratory ailment” which he has had for some time.

Flynn collapsed yesterday while working on To the Last Man. Action will be shot around him until he returns.

Northern Pursuit was originally known as To the Last Man and was based on a magazine story. A.I. Bezzerides wrote the first screenplay under the supervision of Jesse L. Lasky. William Faulkner later worked on the script.

According to Tony Thomas:

“During the production of Northern Pursuit, Flynn took ill in May 1943, collapsing on the set and being hospitalized for a week. The studio released information indicating he had a “upper respiratory ailment,” but he was battling tuberculosis.”

— Tim

 

Fists, Bottles and Chairs

16 May

May 17, 1938
Los Angeles Examiner

ERROL FLYNN AIDS AMERICAN IN FIGHT

Havana, May 17. Errol Flynn, Hollywood film actor, received the thanks today of an unidentified American he saved from serious injury during a fight in a night club here last night.

Fists, bottles and chairs were flying when Flynn intervened. The American who was involved escaped with a broken nose. Flynn was not hurt.

He was accompanied by his wife, who refused to take the matter seriously.

May 17, 1938
Evening Herald Express

ERROL FLYNN, FRIENDS IN HAVANA CAFE FIGHT

“I think this all so funny”, quoth Lili Damita, stage and screen beauty, who was a spectator while fists and bottles flew in a free-for-all-fight at the Eden Concert Night Club with Errol Flynn taking a prominent part in the fighting.

The fight started last night when one of the members of Flynn’s party got into an argument with a man at a nearby table. A minute later, chairs and bottles began to fly.

Flynn, who often plays rough and tumble parts in the movies, joined in with two or three effective punches at those who got in his way. The only casualty was an unidentified American who received a broken nose and a cut eye. Flynn and the others were unhurt and continued their party.

The Eden Concert Night Club was regarded as one of the world’s most “spectacular” and “phenomenally popular” night clubs in the world. Located in the center of town between Sloppy Joe’s and the Hotel Plaza, it evolved in 1939 into the also world-renowned Tropicana Club.

— Tim

 

One, Two, Three – Kick!

15 May

“Beginning in the late 1930s and booming in the 1940s, conga dancing became wildly popular in the US.” Errol occasionally joined in the Congamania – in Cuba, in Hollywood, and in New York. Here is some evidence, beginning with a news report of a wire from Cuba, where Errol had just been, or was very soon to be, involved in a “free-for-all” Dodge City-like fracas at a famous nightclub in Havana, details of which I will post tomorrow.

May 16, 1938

Harrison Carroll
Evening Herald Express ba

Errol Flynn has wired for reservations at La Conga for the night of May 21.

The La Conga in Hollywood


Errol was still kicking more than a year later. Here he is sitting with his sister Rosemary (and Randy Burke) and in a conga line led by Desi Arnaz on tumbadora at the La Conga in Manhattan, on August 5, 1939:



La Conga, Manhattan

The conga craze continued in Hollywood (and around the world) into the Forties. Here’s Desi Arnaz leading a huge line in Too Many Girls (1940) during which he and Lucy fell in love, leading to groundbreaking television history, in the form of I Love Lucy and Desilu Productions, etc. Look for Lucy near the end of this wildly fun conga clip.

— Tim

 

The Long and Winding Road to Mulholland Farm

14 May

May 15, 1939

Harrison Carroll
Evening Herald Express

Racking his brain over what to do with eight loose acres up on Mulholland Drive, overlooking the San Fernando Valley, Errol Flynn hit on an interesting idea. He will turn his property into a fancy rest camp, with eight guest cabins, three tennis courts and a dozen riding nags available for the nearby Hollywood folk in search of quick relaxation.

Flynn plans to spend a lot of money on the project. Chances are that Bud Ernst, one of his close pals, will manage the place, which will be open to the public.

Beautiful but Dangerous Mulholland Drive…

— Tim

 

Most Exciting Costume Play of This or Any Other Era

13 May

The Adventures of Robin Hood; Released May 14, 1938

Quotes from Louella O. Parsons’ glowing review of The Adventures of Robin Hood

The Adventures of Robin Hood is the most exciting costume play of this or any other era. Cunningly combining melodrama, romance, and colorful adventure, it romps along at Twentieth Century speed, making us forget we are seeing legendary characters who lived in the swashbuckling of early England.

Robin Hood comes to us in the person of dashing Errol Flynn, whose performance tops anything the young Flynn has yet given to the screen.

There couldn’t be a lovelier Maid Marian than Olivia de Havilland.

Basil Rathbone gives one of his topping performances as Sir Guy of Gisbourne.

Claude Rains reaches new heights.

Ian Hunter is the perfect King Richard the Lionhearted.

You’ll like the kittenish Una O’Connor, the prankish Eugene Pallete, the hearty and lovable Alan Hale, the weak, spineless Sheriff of Nottingham played by the sterling actor, Melville Cooper, merry crew member Herbert Mundin, and Patric Knowles.

Much credit goes to that splendid director, Michael Curtiz, and William Keighley

The music, by Erich Wolfgang Korngold, is enchanting.

Costumes by Orry-Kelly are beautiful.

The photography, by Tony Gudio and Sol Polito, is poetic.

Perc Westmore, may I say, did a great job on makeup.

The Technicolor adds materially to the beauty of the picture.

Joe Mantegna, who sought and received a Hollywood Walk of Fame Star next to Errol’s, gives a Flynntastic interview about the greatness and importance of both Errol Flynn and The Adventures of Robin Hood. He is a true fan.

— Tim

 

A Knock-Down Drag-Out Affair

13 May

Read the rest of this entry »

— Tim

 

Alice in Wondrousland

11 May

Errol Flynn crowns Alice Moore, La Cuesta Queen at Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff: June 1, 1940

— Tim

 

Location Location Location

11 May

May 11, 1940
The Weekly Wireless

THE HIGH COST OF GRASSHOPPERS

Miriam Hopkins in three moods -demure, gay and grim. The swash buckler is, as you probably guessed, none other than Errol Flynn.

The appearance of a grasshopper in the leading
lady’s bed may wreck a million-dollar movie. That’s why location-man hates arranging locations, especially for films such as
Warner’s spectacular “Virginia City,” made at Flagstaff, with Miriam Hopkins and Errol Flynn.

The stars, director Michael Curtiz, and about a hundred others spent six weeks on the famed
Painted Desert.

Only those who have been on “location” trips can have any idea of the headaches involved. Joe Barry, who handled the “Virginia City” job, estimated the expense og the trip at approximately £20,000, over and above regular salaries and production costs.

But money was the least of his worries. A location invariably offers unexpected problems, which may vary from finding lost children to the discovery of a grasshopper in the leading lady’s bed.

He can figure almost exactly the cost of train fare and freight. He can allow £2OOO, more or less, for food for the company, and not be far wrong.

Even if Miss Hopkins had insisted on strawberries for breakfast, or if Mr. Flynn had called for a special kind of beef to keep up his flagging strength, the final totals would not have been changed much. But there are other expenses which cannot be budgeted so closely. There are the items of rent and feed for horses needed, in addition to those taken from Hollywood, accommodation and food for drivers of trucks and buses from the studio and those hired “on the ground.”

Flagstaff, where the company had to stay, is a small town of 4000 inhabitants, with three small hotels and a limited number of restaurants.
The problem of assigning living quarters and eating places was no small one, and arrangements for doctors, nurses, dentists, barbers, laundries, and filling stations had to be made.
Dry-cleaning alone presents a problem in a small community. Even though he allowed £3OO for that
item, he had to be sure that the local cleaners could give him the overnight service he needed.
He had to get local people to serve as extras, and this invariably led to hard feelings on the part of those he did not employ.

A location-man must, if possible, re-route any regular plane service over the location. Railroad whistles have to be suppressed.. Officials of all kinds must be met, wheedled, placated, and side-tracked. Sometimes fences had to be removed, and replaced later,and roads had to be covered up. (“Virginia City” starts in American Civil War times, so that motor cars and their tracks must be kept well out of sight.)

Irate neighbors in the vicinity who had not been employed by the company chopped wood and beat
on tubs, to the dismay of the sound men, until Joe appeased them.

Fire hazards had to be watched, dry creeks to be flushed with water dragged miles in tanks, a telephone from the company headquarters to the home studio had to be kept open continuously.

On any location at night there are standing-room-only signs before the theatres and cafes. Ice cream is at a premium. The studio had to
put up a big bond that no liquor will be allowed on the Indian reservation near the “Virginia City” camp.

Joe brought the “Virginia City” location back to Hollywood according to budget. But he lost weight doing it. He always does.

ERROL’S LETTER ABOUT THE LOCATION



DICKIE JONES’S MEMORIES OF ERROL AND FLAGSTAFF

Did you stay in Flagstaff while filming Virginia City?

DICK JONES: Oh yeah, I remember it real well. I just about ate myself to death with trout. I loved it. I actually came back to Flagstaff later that year to do The Outlaw.

What can you tell us about the personal appearance you made at Flagstaff’s Orpheum Theater while filming here?

I don’t remember it at all. I probably did a trick roping act, because that was the only thing I knew. (Laughing) I could strum a ukulele but that wouldn’t have been much!

Do you have memories of working with Errol Flynn in Virginia City?

The one thing I can remember was that he had this standard-sized schnauzer. He had that dog trained. [Flynn] had this swagger stick and he’d be slapping his boot with it, then he’d stop to talk to somebody and he’d slap them on their boot with that swagger stick. Then when he walked away the dog would come up and lift its leg up on them. I think [co-star] “Big Boy” Williams almost wanted to kill him!

I really enjoyed working with Errol Flynn. I worked with him again on Rocky Mountain (1950); that was my favorite of all the films I ever made. [Flynn] was one of the best journeyman actors. He knew his trade and worked his craft real well.

— Tim

 
 
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