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Archive for the ‘Prof. T.T. Flynn’ Category

In Eirinn Like Flynn

03 Oct

“Many stories have circulated about Errol’s visits to Belfast, the most repeated (and uncorroborated!) tales are about the excitement he caused at local dances, packed with adoring girls who’d heard that Flynn was to grace their Saturday-night bop!”

www.newsletter.co.uk/lifestyle/nostalgia/potential-links-between-a-local-first-world-war-hero-and-an-american-civil-war-ship-1-8655123…

“Ian Rippey, Secretary of the Co Armagh Wildlife Society, reckons that Flynn definitely visited Belfast, and has information about a positive sighting. And Mr Rippey’s letter ended with an intriguing postscript: “Captain Thomas Blood…had Irish Presbyterian if not Ulster connections.” But first, Ian explained why he’s sure that Flynn came to Belfast.”

“A Miss Rene Liggett of Armagh informed me a good few years ago that she remembered seeing Errol Flynn at Queen’s University, Belfast, when she was a student. I assume that she studied biology under Errol Flynn’s father…I knew Miss Liggett from when I joined the Armagh Field Naturalists Society (now the Co Armagh Wildlife Society) in 1974 until her death. I don’t know whether “Miss Liggett saw Errol Flynn only once or on a number of occasions. All she said was that she had seen him…Miss Liggett died in a nursing home some years ago.”

www.newsletter.co.uk/lifestyle/nostalgia/famous-fictional-pirate-based-on-irish-double-agent-who-stole-crown-jewels-1-8245783…

— Gentleman Tim

 

The Good Doctor

16 Dec

“Many years ago, he met a man whose last name was Flynn. My Dad immediately said “Ah I know that name.” The man sighed and said, ‘you probably have heard of my son Errol Flynn, the film actor.’ My Dad replied, “No. But I do know an illustrious biochemist of that name.” The man put his arm around him and said, “That is the first time anyone recognised my name rather than that of my son.” The pair remained friends for many years.”

www.barbadosadvocate.com…

— Gentleman Tim

 

Quiz

02 Dec

The photo below was taken at a location where one of Errol’s relatives had a prominent connection. In fact, a geological feature there is named after one of Errol’s relatives.

Where is this location? Who was the relative? What feature is named after Errol’s relative, and why??

Clues:
1. It is enormously expensive to visit.
2. Very few people have ever been there.
3. It is a site of rare and spectacular beauty.
4. It’s the most remote location on Earth named after a relative of Errol’s.

— Gentleman Tim

 

Beginning with Bettongs

29 Nov

From very early on, Errol exhibited an intense interest and unique talent for entrepreneurial adventure. Inspired by his father, this often involved scientific exploration and experimentation. Cruise of the Zaca is an eminent example.

But when and where did young Errol first profitably demonstrate this profound talent and interest? Evidence indicates it was in connection to Professor Flynn’s research into the reproductive biology of Tasmanian bettings. In fact, Errol essentially states so in My Wicked, Wicked Ways:

“When school finished, I raced home to be at his side, to hurry out into the back yard, where we had cages of specimens of rare animals… Through Father’s activity I made my first venture into commerce. He bought all the kangaroo rats [bettongs] he could get hold of for Hobart University. I learned to set box traps in the hills of near-by Mount Wellington. He paid a shilling a head.”

Putting Errol’s bettongs to exceptionally good use, Professor Flynn published a landmark paper in 1930 on the reproduction of the Tasmanian bettong.

Here is a rare nocturnal photo of the hard-to-catch, truffle-hunting Tasmanian bettong in the act of night-jumping.

And here is a spectacular view from Mt. Wellingon of the hills of Hobart where pre-teen Errol trapped bettongs for his father’s pioneering research into marsupials.

— Gentleman Tim

 

Blood Connection

18 Nov

ERROL, PETER, AND THOMAS

www.newsletter.co.uk/lifestyle/nostalgia/irishman-s-great-crown-robbery-is-top-of-the-list-in-the-annals-of-historic-heists-1-8250389…

www.bbc.com…

“In London, Thomas Blood, an Irish adventurer better known as “Captain Blood,” was captured attempting to steal the Crown Jewels from the Tower of London.

Blood, a Parliamentarian during the English Civil War, was deprived of his estate in Ireland with the restoration of the English monarchy in 1660. In 1663, he put himself at the head of a plot to seize Dublin Castle from supporters of King Charles II, but the plot was discovered and his accomplices executed. He escaped capture. In 1671, he hatched a bizarre plan to steal the new Crown Jewels, which had been refashioned by Charles II because most of the original jewels were melted down after Charles I’s execution in 1649.

On May 9, 1671, Blood, disguised as a priest, managed to convince the Jewel House keeper to hand over his pistols. Blood’s three accomplices then emerged from the shadows, and together they forced their way into the Jewel House. However, they were caught in the act when the keeper’s son showed up unexpectedly, and an alarm went out to the Tower guard. One man shoved the Royal Orb down his breeches while Blood flattened the Crown with a mallet and tried to run off with it. The Tower guards apprehended and arrested all four of the perpetrators, and Blood was brought before the king. Charles was so impressed with Blood’s audacity that, far from punishing him, he restored his estates in Ireland and made him a member of his court with an annual pension.

Captain Blood became a colorful celebrity all across the kingdom, and when he died in 1680 his body had to be exhumed in order to persuade the public that he was actually dead.”

A Traditional History of Thomas Blood:

A Comical UK Documentary

Part One

Part Two

— Gentleman Tim

 

Eireann Errol?

17 Mar

How Irish was Flynn?

Still widely regarded as an Irishman, even more so in his Hollywood hey days, how Irish was Errol in reality? Genetically and culturally?

The name Flynn and his father’s apparent ancestral and professional connections to Ireland seem to indicate Errol had some significant percentage of Irish blood, but how much? He also seemed to treasure and/or at least play up his Irish. He may not have liked being portrayed as a American-Irish motorcycle cop, as he was initially by Warners, but he did seem to relish the roles of Peter Blood and Gentleman Jim. His fighting spirit appeared Irish in nature also. And he did go by Flynnie in his early days. How much of it was real, and how much was theater, perhaps designed to make big green off of the huge population of Irish-American movie fans?

What do you think, me fellow fans of Flynn?

www.bbc.com…

www.irishnews.com…

— Gentleman Tim

 

Errol’s House & Treehouse?

22 Nov

Errol’s old digs. Near the Errol Flynn Reserve Playground, too!

www.themercury.com…

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Anyone for tennis? Errol flynns former residence. Circa1885 sandstone/weatherboard mansion. 295m over three levels including 11 rooms and sunroom.

Once home to Hobart’s most famous export Errol Flynn, this gracious 1885 house is brimming with charm and intrigue.

The sheltered backyard incorporates a tree house, believed to be constructed from the remains of an old shed burnt to the ground by a young Errol (whose father was a university lecturer in the early part of last century).

Located across the road from the Domain Tennis Centre, this substantial dual-access residence offers a commanding city and Mt Wellington outlook.

The three-level mansion designed by prominent architect Henry Hunter has many outstanding features including the original front door lock and doorbell knob. Other fine features include a wide verandah (which overlooks the meticulously maintained Tennis Centre), an imposing bay window, lofty ceilings, four-panel doors and romantic fireplaces.

Magnificent proportions create a sense of grandeur. Long sash windows mix with original timber floorboards in the family living room, which opens to the spacious eat-in kitchen. The beautiful mountain and city outlook creates an outstanding backdrop for family and guests in the sun-drenched kitchen and adjoining sunroom.
The formal dining room brings together neutral carpeting and a coal-grate fireplace, which is flanked by bookshelves.

Possibly the most impressive room is the formal sitting room with striking bay window and fireplace with fluted surrounds.Seven bedrooms and three bathrooms are scattered across the multi-level home, ideal for an expanding family or a couple who wish to accommodate overnight guests. The four sunny upstairs bedrooms are particularly appealing, with their charming arched windows, pretty views and abundance of natural light.

The lower level opens to the backyard, which in turn connects to Lillie St (providing convenient vehicular access).
Other noteworthy features include 2x reverse-cycle heat pumps, off peak heating and a security alarm system.

* Prime Location
* Designed by Henry Hunter
* Stunning Views
* 6 Sector Reticulation
* New Carpet
* 1885 Sandstone/Weatherboard Mansion
* 3 x Bathrooms
* 11 x Rooms & sunroom
* Possible 7 x Bedrooms
* Overlooking The Domain Tennis Club
* Off Street Parking
* House size 295m
* Land area 424m

— Gentleman Tim

 

The Flynnomenal Professorship of Theodore Thomson Flynn*

30 May

www.us…

*With “Awe-In-Spiring” Quiz Answer Included

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— Gentleman Tim

 

The Papers of Errol and Theodore Flynn

26 May

A Treasure Trove at the National Library of Australia

nla.gov…
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— Gentleman Tim

 

January 23, 1909

23 Jan

The Marriage of Theodore Thompson Flynn & Lily Mary Young

At St. John’s Anglican (Church of England) Church in Balmain, Sydney*

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Young-Thompson

www.wikitree.com…

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www.wikitree.com…

marelle_errol

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port-TT & Marelle 1954-lge

* Very young Errol was there, too, then several months in Lily’s womb.

— Gentleman Tim