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Archive for the ‘Gentleman Tim’ Category

Captain Blood in the Saddle

28 Mar

March 27, 1939

Evening Herald Express

Errol Flynn will bounce along in a $25,000 silver saddle for the rodeo at Dodge City. The history of the Santa Fe Trail is engraved on it.

Dodge City’s First Rodeo

“A mile long parade featured the actors and elected officials, including the governors of Kansas, Colorado and New Mexico. This was followed by a rodeo” at McCarty Stadium. Though there was not enough time to stage a full-fledged rodeo, the event inspired Dodge City to have its first real rodeo, the Boot Hill Roundup, later that year. This event has evolved into today’s PRCA’s Dodge City Day’s Roundup Rodeo.

For Those Who Want to be Dressin’ Like Flynn in a Long-Haired Beaver, Frontier Fur Felt Cowboy Hat!

— Gentleman Tim

 

Honeymoon, Yes — Marriage, No

27 Mar

www.todayifoundout.com…

Honeymoon Over Miami Way

March 28, 1938

Jimmy Starr

Although maritime laws permit a captain to perform a perfectly legal marriage ceremony, it isn’t as easy as it might sound. There are certain official papers that a seaworthy captain must have.

Of course, Errol Flynn is the captain of his yacht, but that doesn’t alone give him the right to tie the holy bonds of matrimony, as he was informed by local maritime officials.

And that revelation somewhat changes the marital plans of Gertrude Hemmer and Ralph Cobley, Miami friends of Errol’s, who planned to have the Warner star perform the wedding ceremony for them aboard his new yacht, which stops over at the southern city en route to Hollywood. The couple will be married on shore and will spend a brief honeymoon aboard Flynn’s boat.

Miami Beach 1938

Miami 1938

— Gentleman Tim

 

The Train to Spain ====== Mainly on the Plain

26 Mar


“Beautiful spring day, warm sunshine, country beautiful. How can people fight a war in this lovely weather? Four hours train journey from here the most savage cruel patricidal war is being waged.”
First entry in Errol’s Spanish Civil War Diary- March 26, 1937 (83 years ago today)

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Excerpts from Robin de los Bosques in the Spanish War

See, also: Lincoln Douglas Hurst: The True Adventures of a Real-Life Rogue

“In 1935, Flynn married French-American actress Lili Damita (divorcing in 1942), with whom he had a very stormy relationship, with frequent physical fights. They were called the “Fighting Flynns,” and he called his wife “Tiger Lili.” When his friend Dr. Herman F. Erben Read the rest of this entry »

— Gentleman Tim

 

A Pirate’s Role for Flynn

25 Mar

March 26, 1935

Errol Flynn, the husky Irish actor at Warners, gets his second film assignment. He will be see as a pirate with Robert Donat in Captain Blood. He is the first member of a supporting cast selected. Now it is uncertain if Jean Muir will have the feminine lead.

Midsummer Night Players: Ross Alexander & Jean Muir, Olivia DeHavilland & William Powell

Jean Muir – Why the 1930’s Warner Brothers Actress Left Film

— Gentleman Tim

 

Sea Scout Scuttled

24 Mar

It’s overboard with the Sea Scout, but a wonderful day in the neighborhood for Fred Rogers and John Glover…

www.theerrolflynnblog.com…

March 23, 1938

Harrison Carroll
Evening Herald Express

…The two young men who will accompany Errol Flynn on his cruise are John Glover and Fred Rogers, both of New York.

— Gentleman Tim

 

Olivia & Oscar No. 2

23 Mar

March 23, 1950

After she made it big with Errol, Olivia won two Best Actress Oscars. She won her first in 1948 for “To Each His Own”. Seventy years ago today she won her second, for “The Heiress”. Below is Jimmy Stewart’s announcement of her winning, and her acceptance speech:


P.S. Ralph could tell us better than anyone else on earth who won Best Actor

— Gentleman Tim

 

Two-Hour Blitzkrieg Upon the Human Nerves?

23 Mar

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March 23, 1940

Frank S. Nugent
The New York Times

All the extravagant adjectives in the book, plus a few lalapaloozas especially constructed for the occasion, may be employed without challenge by the Warner Brothers in calling attention to their latest prospection in the epic vein, “Virginia City.” For such a bundle of action-melodrama, such an excess of old-time super-colossalisms has not been seen in years to compare with this veritable archive of familiar outdoor thrill tricks, now showing at the Strand.

Practically everything guaranteed by long experience to stimulate an audience’s excitement—everything except technicolor—has been utilized by the Warner workshop to contrive this two-hour Blitzkrieg upon the human nerves.

From the moment that Federal Captain Bradford and Captain Irby of the Confederate Army square off in a Richmond prison, you and they are in for it, with such successive episodes as an explosive escape from the prison, a fight atop a runaway stagecoach, the usual roistering in a frontier town saloon, an outlaw raid upon a covered-wagon train and the arrival of the United States cavalry to while away the time. There is even a last-minute pardon from the lips of President Lincoln.

Put together as it is from patches which have the well-worn look, it is inevitable that this story of an unsuccessful Confederate attempt to run gold from Virginia City during the last days of the Civil War should be strictly synthetic. There is something depressingly pat about the personal interludes. You just know the beautiful Confederate spy, who doubles as a dancing girl, will fall in love with the Union captain, that she will agonize between love and duty, that the end will be duly heroic.

And, as played by Errol Flynn and Miriam Hopkins, the leading roles become no less obviously carpentered. Mr. Flynn is about as mobile as a floor walker; Miss Hopkins recites her stilted lines by rote. Only Randolph Scott as the Confederate captain behaves as though he was actually on the spot.

But waving the individuals aside, which is what is usually done in outdoor thrillers, there is enough concentrated action in the picture, enough of the old-time Western sweep, to make it lively entertainment. After all, with such models for obvious reference as “The Covered Wagon,” “Stagecoach” and even a bit of “Gone With the Wind,” Director Michael Curtiz could hardly have missed.

— Gentleman Tim

 

Dodging Dodge City? — OR Dreading Bette D?

22 Mar

March 20, 1939

Louella O. Parsons
Los Angeles Examiner

If Errol Flynn fails to show up for his preview, Bob Taplinger is going to lose some money. Errol’s trusting P.A. is betting that he will be there, but knowing the Flynn temperament I wouldn’t want to do any wagering myself. Errol doesn’t have to be back in Hollywood until May, when he plays Essex to Bette Davis’ Elizabeth.
Another change in the schedule has put The Knight and the LadyThe Miracle. You’ll see Claude Rains as Bacon, poet laureate of the Elizabethan era. It will all be in Technicolor. Bette’s first. This Queen Elizabeth is based on Robert Sherwood’s “Elizabeth the Queen”.

— Gentleman Tim

 

Two Big Kisses

22 Mar

March 21, 1949

Harrison Carroll
Evening Herald Express

Errol Flynn now talks of writing a part for Greer Garson in his screen story, The Last Buccaneer, I don’t know how much importance to attach to thecwarm new friendship of Errol and Greer, but I keep hearing that her romance with Buddy Fogelson is cooling, and she and Flynn certainly do have a good time together.

Greer has a lively sense if humor. On the last day of The Forsythe Saga, she and Flynn were doing a scene in a buggy. Greer had Errol’s side of the buggy wired. When she pressed a button, he went up in the air like he had been stuck with a pin.

The cast and crew had their “end of the picture” party a Chinese restaurant in Culver City.* Greer presented Errol with a gag-gift – red wig, beard and eyebrows to wear in England so the fans won’t recognize from him. Among other things, Errol presented Greer with two big kisses right in front of everybody.

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Perhaps Errol used that re-beard. gag-gift on the set of Kim!

Mrs. Miniver had maximum talent…

* In days of old in the Golden State, pre-corona v., Californians could dine-in at Chinese restaurants in Culver City.

— Gentleman Tim

 

The Feminine Touch

19 Mar

March 19, 1936

Louella O. Parsons
Los Angeles Examiner

The blonde, harp-playing Anita Louise, who seems to have more admirers than any other girl of her age in Hollywood, is being given the biggest chance of her career by Warner Brothers. She will furnish the feminine touch in The Charge of the Light Brigade, which again brings us Errol Flynn, Warner’s newest star. One picture, Captain Blood, put Flynn in the success class.

— Gentleman Tim