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Archive for the ‘Flynn-related’ Category

News from New Zealand

26 Apr

Errol helps save south South Island from broken bottles, monkey parades, idle, dissolute and aimlessly wandering youths.

from THE SOUTHLAND TIMES (April 2017)

“Movie Screening”

“The first Sunday movie screening in Invercargill was in February 1910 when there was a “cinematograph entertainment” on a Sunday to aid the hospital fund.

After lying low for many years the issue arose again in 1961.

The arguments were predictable. Most churches waved their arms in horror at the thought that a day of rumination and self-flagellation should be polluted with entertainment, yet the dissolute youths of the town needed films of good character to stop them breaking bottles.

GC Tapper told the council committee investigating the question, “Although not enthusiastic about picture theatres being open on Sundays I now hold the view that something must be done about the idle youths wandering aimlessly about the streets on Sunday evenings and a six month trial with suitable films is now definitely called for.”

The Baptist Union said, “We consider that it is a violation of the sacredness of the Lord’s Day upon which our Christian community is based. We do not believe that there is any evidence of a real need for this because, from observation, there has not been seen any large groups of young people aimlessly wandering our streets on a Sunday night.”

The Catholic Church said, “There is no objection to the screening of films on Sundays. Once our people have fulfilled their obligation of worshipping God on Sundays, they may take part in any form of lawful recreation.”

Another submitter said, “If the opening of cinemas on Sunday evenings would reduce monkey parading, why does it not do so on Saturday evenings or Bank holidays when they are open. Furthermore, increasing facilities for Sunday sports, and the official recognition and sanction of them, have already drawn thousands of young people from the church services and robbed the Sunday Schools of their teachers.”

The Master of Ballantrae, a movie of an improving nature, was screened on Sunday, March 12, 1961. The Master of Ballantrae was a 1953 British Technicolorfilm starring Errol Flynn. It was an adaptation of Robert Louis Stevenson’s famous novel of the same name.”

— Gentleman Tim

 

An “Errol Flynn Stadium”?

09 Apr

A new AFL stadium in Tasmania? – Maybe an “Errol Flynn Stadium”?

Will fans travel the yellow tint road?

Does Tasmania need its own Canberra?

— Gentleman Tim

 

Jack Marino’s Forgotten Heroes Homage to Flynn!

03 Apr

I was on Facebook the other day and noticed that Jack Marino’s old friend, actor William Smith, had turned 84. Bill Smith is retired now but among his many film credits you already know him for are such films as Any Which Way You Can with Clint Eastwood, Darker than Amber with Rod Taylor, and Twilight’s Last Gleaming with Burt Lancaster. TV audiences remember him from his role on Rich Man, Poor Man as the evil Falconetti. But he also appeared in literally hundreds of top classic tv shows like “Kung Fu,” “The Bearcats,” “Columbo,” “Mission Impossible,” “Ironside,” “The Six Million Dollar Man,” “Police Woman,” “The Rockford Files,” “Planet of the Apes,” “Kolchak, The Night Stalker,” “SWAT,” “Police Story,” “Logan’s Run,” “Vegas,” “Fantasy Island,” “The Dukes of Hazard” and “The A Team.” And as Conan the Barbarian’s father! And there is another film performance that links him to Errol Flynn. Jack Marino cast him in the role of General Gregori Zelenkov in the 1990 film directed by our own Jack Marino, FORGOTTEN HEROES. Jack even plays a small role in the film himself. See him in the Trailer below chomping on a cigar!

The war in Viet Nam War was deeply unpopular. And if you were in uniform during that war as in all wars you did your duty as well and as bravely as any other soldier in any war throughout history. But when you got home from this war, the welcome was not the same as it was for the heroes of other wars. It was not until years later that any sort of respect for the veterans of the Viet Nam War was recognized. Jack’s film FORGOTTEN HEROES was made to address the overdue respect these veterans deserved and to be a great adventure story as well, and as I was reading more about the film on Facebook (I had seen the DVD release and had a chance to meet William Smith at Jack and Louise’s now legendary 100th birthday centennial for Errol Flynn in Hollywood in 2009, and had Smith sign my copy of the DVD) I noticed a review of the film written by filmmaker Steve Latshaw who was at the party that lasted over five days! Steve had written the review in 2008. It was on Facebook the other day, too. Jack had posted this:

Hollywood is a tough and unforgiving business and when a fellow artist, filmmaker, writer admires your work and puts it in writing, it makes all this struggle worth it.

Jack

“I am watching FORGOTTEN HEROES tonight and am reminded of what a beautiful, heartfelt film it is. You’ve seen it so many times it’s impact may be lost on you. It’s truly a great film, beautifully shot. And I loved the nods to Errol, particularly the incredible scene where the surfer has been tortured and asks the Greek to kill him. It reminded me of the great scene in Objective Burma – but you took it further and the emotional impact was profound.

I have made over 35 movies in my career. I have always wanted to make a film that would affect people lives in a profound and positive way. I haven’t yet done so. I’ve often said I’d give up my career if I could make one film like that. You did it right out of the gate.

I am and continue to be in awe of your passion and envious of your talent.

Bung Ho!

Steve

Steve Latshaw – Filmmaker
April 13, 2008

And that is not the only nod to Flynn. Jack, always a Flynn fan, and a friend of the Flynn family, adds a few Flynn touches like dueling shadows, some western style gunplay and even a bit of swordplay! You can’t miss these references if you love dear old Errol and never do these moments get in the way of the exciting story. They just make you smile and appreciate them.

That takes a lot of skill on Jack’s part.

And to help bring a bit of recognition to the veterans of the Viet Nam War Jack decided to donate a portion of every DVD ordered from his Forgotten Heroes the Movie website to benefit veterans.

If you know a veteran, please consider sending them a copy of this extraordinary movie. And share Forgotton Heroes the Movie homepage on a few Social Media for others to see …

Great job, Jack!

 


— David DeWitt

 

Mail Bag! Cecil Jones Hollywood Collection Errol Flynn Calling Card Plate!

02 Apr

From our Mail Bag come this from Cecil Jones:

David,
Some years ago I obtained a box of Errol Flynn’s personal papers from storage and the only item I kept was the copper plate for making his calling card. I toyed with the idea of making the back of my business card to be that of Errol Flynn’s calling card but never did. Possibly you could inform those interested that the printing plate will be offered by Profiles In History at their Hollywood auction in late May to mid-June time frame.

The auction catalogue is not out yet but I have attached the pre-catalogue below for all of my Flynn items (see below) for those interested.

The copper plate is something the true Flynn collector could use as well as enjoy as it was Flynn’s personal property and was used to make his calling card.

The following link is to the Profiles In History website and shows the upcoming Hollywood auction highlighting a few items from my collection. The entire auction should be available within the next month including all of the Flynn items below.

The link to the “Cecil Jones Hollywood Collection

Thank you,
Cecil Jones

Thanks Cecil, we look forward to this!

— David DeWitt

 

Dr. Who?

28 Mar

Given the Green Light by shangheinz on “Errorol”:

WHAT PROMINENT ENGLISH DOCTOR HELPED ERROL TREAT HIS SINUSES?

He was a “Harley Street” practitioner.

Early in his career, he pioneered and advocated the use of “truth drugs”.

He famously advocated one such drug in a French murder case.

Mid-career he was involved as an expert witness in a Hong Kong medical malpractice case.

He was later involved in a notorious British abortion/killing-of the-mother case.

He communicated from England to Errol elsewhere in Europe.

He had an indirect connection to the Profumo Affair.

Late in his career, he was quoted in Sports Illustrated concerning the abilities of women drivers.

He looked like this, but usually wore glasses during the years he treated Errol:

— Gentleman Tim

 

Errol’s Barman at “London’s Most Famous Hotel”

15 Mar

Here’s the story on Joe Gilmore, former barman at the Savoy Hotel’s “American Bar” in London.

i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/03550/gilmore2_3550591b.jpg…

Flynn, Neil Armstrong, Lady Di, he served them all.

For Errol, served rare Vodka with red pepper, as recounted in the article below.

www.independent.co.uk/topic/errol-flynn…

Errol at the Savoy in ’54, Joe’s first year at the “American Bar”
media.gettyimages.com…

Here’s Errol at the Savoy, Joe’s first year at the Savoy’s American Bar:
media.gettyimages.com…

— Gentleman Tim

 

Speaking of Burma …

08 Mar

Errol starred in a movie which included an actor in key role who in real life served in America’s Burma campaigns. This actor even had a hand in bombing the equivalent of the fictional but fact-based “Bridge Over the River Kwai”?

Here’s some Jeopardy-like music for you to listen to while you contemplate who this actor was:

— Gentleman Tim

 

A New Errol Flynn Movie?

07 Mar

Due Out Friday

“Hiddleston displays his inner Errol Flynn”

www.couriermail.com…

Skull Island was “a no-brainer” says Samuel K. Jackson:

“I was trying to grow up and be Errol Flynn at one point. I wanted to jump from ship to ship, with a sword in my teeth.”

www.goerie.com…

— Gentleman Tim

 

As You Wish

06 Mar
    Carl Elwes as Errol Flynn

    On tour discussing The Princess Bride, including this weekend in Florida

    The Princess Bride: An Evening With Cary Elwes

    Merging multiple news sources …

    “Cary Elwes was chosen for the role of Westley in Princess Bride because he reminded Carl Reiner of the swashbuckling heroes of early cinema, specifically Errol Flynn and Douglas Fairbanks As depicted below, he later joined Flynn and Fairbanks in playing Robin Hood, of course.

    Elwes and Mandy Patinkin spent more months perfecting their famous swordfight — right- and left-handed. Reiner hired the best coaches in Hollywood: Peter Diamond and Bob Anderson. Not only did both men train the original swashbuckler, Errol Flynn, they both worked on Star Wars.”

    — Gentleman Tim

     

The Buccaneer?

01 Mar

We here all know Flynn was by far the best buccaneer in cinematic history. But he was always a Brit in one form or another, right? Here in New Orleans, however, the most “heroic” or at least heralded real-life buccaneer of all was the anti-Brit Jean LaFitte. How do you think Flynn would have fit and fared in the role of The Buccaneer, Jean LaFitte?

“The Buccaneer [was] a 1938 American adventure film made by Paramount Pictures based on Jean Lafitte and the Battle of New Orleans during the War of 1812. It was produced and directed by Cecil B. DeMille.”

“The film stars Fredric March as Lafitte, Franciska Gaal and Akim Tamiroff with Margot Grahame, Walter Brennan, Ian Keith, Spring Byington, Douglass Dumbrille, Beulah Bondi and Anthony Quinn in supporting roles.” This, therefore, would have “reunited” Errol with “I Adore You” Margot Grahame, paired him with Hungarian star Francisca Gaal (fresh off her noted role as “Lilli”, and had his radio producer, silver screen great, Cecil B. DeMille, producing him for the first and only time on film.

“Cecil B. DeMille remade the film in 1958 in Technicolor and VistaVision with the same title, but because of ill health, he allowed Henry Wilcoxon, his longtime friend and associate, to produce it, and the film was directed by Anthony Quinn, who was his son-in-law at the time. DeMille received no screen credit, but did make a personal appearance in the prologue to the film, much as he did in The Ten Commandments. The 1958 version of The Buccaneer stars Yul Brynner, Charles Boyer and Claire Bloom, with Charlton Heston as Andrew Jackson. Douglass Dumbrille appeared in both versions and Quinn acted in the earlier version.”

I have not found clips from the 1938 version with the always excellent Fredric Marsh, but here’s a photo, followed by a terrific trailer, in ’58, featuring Ceci B. DeMille and Yul. Yul agree, I believe, that Flynn would have been better than Brynner.

**********

In the French Quarter footsteps of Flynn, can be found the following relevant sites, all along Bourbon Street:

“Jean LaFitte’s Blacksmith Shop”, a front for his piratical activities.

savingplaces.org…

And here, upstairs, is where LaFitte is said to have planned the Battle of New Orleans, in 1812 (and where, during WWII, Errol was also in a bit of a battle himself, when this building, downstairs, was known as the Old Absinthe House.

Flynn @ the Old Absinthe House

The second and third photos below of a 19th Century painting of the Battle of 1812 in the original planning room upstairs, and a wooden model of LaFitte’s lead ship, carved by one of the pirates from that ship.

— Gentleman Tim