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Archive for the ‘Film Clips’ Category

Hats Off to Ronald Reagan

21 May

May 21, 1948

Sidney Skolsky
Hollywood Citizen News

Ronald Reagan: He is an actor who is interested in the welfare of actors and in their position in the industry. He has advanced from a supporting player to a leading man. He is always to know what pictures are being made at his studio, and when hears of any he likes, he makes a bid for it. He is very pleased that he is no longer told they wanted Errol Flynn for a certain picture, but that they are going to give it to him.

— Gentleman Tim

 

Bond, Ward Bond

14 Mar

ricochet.com…

— Gentleman Tim

 

Best Western

12 Mar

“10 favorite Western movies”

Number 1:

“They Died with Their Boots On” (1941): Friends of mine know how much I enjoy the old Errol Flynn movies, and this might be the best of them all.

www.whig.com…

— Gentleman Tim

 

Flynnfluences in Star Wars

27 Feb

It was just announced that Star Wars Episode IX, will be released in December. Though the “final chapter of the Star Wars saga”, Errol’s inspiration on the series has been profound, from the very start, as confirmed by the quotes below.

Lucas and Spielberg

“If one man defines the era of swashbuckling Hollywood action that George Lucas and Steven Spielberg (used as a model) it’s Errol Flynn.”

Harrison Ford/Hans Solo

“Ford’s Han Solo is a watershed creation … a conscious throwback —you can see Errol Flynn’s lightness there …”

Billy Dee Williams/Lando Calrissian

“I patterned Lando after actors I saw when I was a boy, like Errol Flynn and all those swashbucklers. I always liked those bigger-than-life characters.”

“Lando is fun-loving, kind of roguish. He was a swashbuckling character, kind of an Errol Flynn. I wanted to make the character bigger than life.”

Samuel K. Jackson/Mace Windu

“Errol Flynn films he watched as a boy informed his role in Star Wars.”

“What I love about ‘Star Wars’ is that it’s your basic Errol Flynn movie, but it’s science fiction,”

“For me, it was the ’70’s Errol Flynn movie. And as a kid I’d always wanted to be … that swash-buckling pirate, you know — jumping over stuff and getting busy that way. And all of a sudden we got some space buccaneers.”

Alden Ehrenreich/Hans Solo in Solo: A Star Wars Story

“Ehreneich channels a young Errol Flynn as this galaxy’s favorite rogue.”

Carrie Fisher

“Not only all this, but we find Olivia de Havilland as Maid Marian, sporting that imperious hauteur and even Princess Leia’s hairdo long before they were fashionable.”

Light-Saber Duels

Errol Flynn’s charming scoundrel may be closer in character to Han Solo than Luke Skywalker, but his acrobatic swordplay – especially the famous fight with Basil Rathbone – became a crucial touchstone for the latter’s saber choreography. Bob Anderson was a fencing choreographer and double for both Flynn (in the 50s) and for Star Wars.

John Williams

The composer of this matinee favourite was one Erich Wolfgang Korngold, from whom John Williams derived a brassy, fanfare-rich approach to orchestration and even a theme or two – Korngold’s score for King’s Row (1942) was used as a temp track while Lucas was cutting Star Wars together.

— Gentleman Tim

 

Errol & Livvie at the Library

25 Feb

“One Eyed Willie’s ship, The Inferno, was 105 feet long and took 2-1/2 months to construct. It was modeled after Errol Flynn’s ship in The Sea Hawk (1940).”

www.loc.gov…

— Gentleman Tim

 

In Like Indiana Flynn?

10 Oct

www.theguardian.com…

“GOOD OLD-FASHIONED ENTERTAINMENT”

“A FUN FILM, CONSTRUCTED IN A SMART WAY”

“A DELIGHTFUL (FOUR-STAR) RAPID-FIRE ROMP”

— Gentleman Tim

 

Flynnosophy 101

05 Jun

Flynnie reveals his real-life philosophy of life to “Sister” Bette.

— Gentleman Tim

 

This Sunday Morning

17 Sep

Posted Sunday, September 16, 2017

A fascinating behind-the-scenes bio of Warner Brothers’ songwriter, Moe Jerome.

From Tin Pan Alley to Tinseltown, from “A Daughter’s Prayer at Twilight” to “Some Sunday Morning”.

www.thedailybeast.com…

“At Warner Bros. from 1929 to 1949, he wrote, not for the masses, but for a film’s producer who wanted a song for a comedy or a western, or a drama or a musical. Take, for example the 1945 film San Antonio, starring Errol Flynn and Alexis Smith. He and his lyricist partner, Ted Koehler, quickly created a lovely ballad called “Some Sunday Morning.”

“The film was an instant hit. So was “Some Sunday Morning.” It was Flynn and Smith’s romantic theme song. Every time the two appeared on screen, the melody played in the background, courtesy of the film’s composer, Max Steiner. Smith sang it in a large production number set in the local saloon.”

“As early as January 5, 1946, the song made Billboard’s “Honor Roll of Hits,” a list denoting America’s top tunes. It charted at Number 9. Sales of sheet music were also excellent: for 14 weeks, the song was in the top five. And early in 1946, the song was nominated for an Oscar for Best Song.”

Some Sunday Morning”

What initially brought Jerome great fame and success, however, was “Just a Baby’s Prayer at Twilight”, a song he wrote during World War I – once contemporaneously called “the greatest constructed song ever published.”

“Moe had high hopes for a particular melody he wrote, a kind of lullaby he often hummed when he put his young son to sleep. But he wanted this song to be a statement about the cost of the war, what it did to those left behind.”

“Just a Baby’s Prayer at Twilight (For My Daddy Over There)”

— Gentleman Tim

 

The Battle of New Orleans

07 Sep

John L. Sullivan v. Gentleman Jim Corbett
www.thesweetscience.com…
(See the last three paragraphs for the Flynn connection)

And listen to Liam Neeson’s introduction of (Errol) “one of the ultimate matinee idols” playing (Gentleman Jim) “one of the first matinee idols.” (at 1:09:54 through 1:12)

— Gentleman Tim

 

Pirate Party on Catalina Isle! First Appearance!

30 Aug

All Flynn followers are familiar with the brief appearance of Errol and Lily in Pirate Party on Catalina Island, but there was always a little confusion about when this quiet little short subject appeared. To help quell any more questions, here is a clip from the Los Angeles Times newspaper of Feb. 12, 1936, page 11.

 

It premiered with the Charlie Chaplin film Modern Times.

Enjoy,

 

— Ada Klock