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Archive for the ‘Directors’ Category

Leap Day 1940 – Part 2

01 Mar

February 29, 1940

Sidney Skolsky
Watching Them Make Pictures

If you wait long enough on a Michael Curtiz set, you’re bound to hear a Curtizism. The other afternoon on the set of The Sea Hawk I had a long wait. In fact for the first time I thought reliable Mike was going to fail me. Director Curtiz had Errol play a scene over and over. And everytime he gave an order I expected him to pull a gem. But he didn’t.

Finally, Errol did the scene the way Curtiz and reliable Mike came through. He said: “Errol, you worked hard. But it’s alright. You can’t get anything for nothing unless you pay for it.”

— Gentleman Tim

 

Leading the Charge

20 Feb

February 18, 1936

Jimmy Starr
Evening Herald Express

For his splendid directorial work on Captain Blood, Michael Curtiz has been awarded the important task of wielding the megaphone on The Charge of the Light Brigade. again starring new rave Errol Flynn, which will be one of the most lavishly produced on the Warner lists this season.

And now a whack from Lizzie Yeaman…

February 18, 1936

Elizabeth Yeaman
Hollywood Citizen News

The directorial stock of Michael Curtiz has soared many points since the rekease of Captain BloodThe Charge of the Light Brigade. This picture will be a big special production with a budget even larger than that established for Captain Blood. Curtiz, futhermore, is well qualified by experience to direct this story of the Crimean War. For four years he fought as an officer in the Austrian calvary during the World War, and he also served during two Austrian revolutions. Flynn, meanwhile, is rapidly recovering from his appendix operation.

— Gentleman Tim

 

The Light Brigade Rides Again/Making of the Charge

02 Jan

“The Light Brigade Rides Again”

“The Making of the Charge of the Light Brigade”

— Gentleman Tim

 

“History is history”

30 Dec

December 28, 1937

Hollywood Citizen News

Sidney Skolsky Presents
Watching Them Make Pictures

Errol Flynn, Olivia de Havilland, Claude Rains, and a crowd of extras are getting ready to play a scene for the picture, Robin Hood.

The setting is Nottingham Castle in England, and a feast is about to take place. Errol Flynn is Robin Hood, and Claude Rains is Prince John. The extras, dressed as knights, stand out in their shining armor. Director Mike Curtiz seems out of place, wearing trousers and a sweater.

Dirctor Curtiz gives the signal that he is ready. The cameras are turning. Robin Hood Flynn, lugging a deer, walks toward the banquet table. Here Prince John, with meats and wines before him, is entertaining. Robin Hood Flynn offers him the deer for the feast.

It is then that Prince John interrupts the scene and becomes Claude Rains.

He says to Curtiz, “Mike, I forgot to tell you something. I’ve been doing some research on the part. And according to history, Prince John was a vegetarian, and he never drank wine.”

Miss de Havilland and Mr. Rathbone, standing at the banquet table, are amazed, but say that history is history.

But this doesn’t stop director Curtiz. He says: “We need this big scene for the picture. In the movies we don’t make historical pictures, we make history.”

— Gentleman Tim

 

Hat’s Off, Mike

24 Dec

December 24, 1937

Jimmy Starr
LA Evening Herald Express

For a thrilling scene in Robin Hood, Errol Flynn threw a 15 pound spear through a window and is supposed to make it stick in the opposite wall. Flynn threw the spear, but his name was poor.

Lucky for director Michael Curtiz that he ducked in time.  The spear nipped off his hat, pinning it to the floor of the stage. “Are you hurt?” screamed the frantic Flynn.

“No, I am all right,” replied Mike, “but look at my hat — she is dead!”

— Gentleman Tim

 

A Curt Tease by Curtiz

26 Sep

Third Week of September, 1943

Sidney Skolsky
Hollywood Citizen News

Mike Curtiz was teasing Errol Flynn, and said: “I don’t need you, I’ll make a picture with Dennis Morgan – and I’ll make him a thousand times braver than you ever were.”

— Gentleman Tim

 

Hit Him Like You Hit Roark

16 Dec

Eighty Years Ago

Third Week of December, 1938

LOS ANGELES EXAMINER
By Erskine Johnson

Headlines that told of a short but terrific fight between Errol Flynn and Aiden Roark, polo player and studio executive, are scarcely dry when Flynn returns to work on his new picture, Dodge City. And oddly enough, his first scene requires him to leap out of a barber’s chair and slug Douglas Fowley. Several times director Michael Curtiz films the scene but Flynn makes his pulled punches look bad. Finally Curtiz becomes exasperated. “Hit him like the newspapers said you hit Roark, ” he demands. Flynn grins and in the next “take” he makes his pulled punch look like the real thing, and Fowley sails back on a pile of mattresses laid out to break his fall.

* Douglas Fowley was a long-time movie and tv bad guy, as well as the father of hyper-wacko Kim “Alley Oop” Fowley.

— Gentleman Tim

 

Memorial Day Salute

29 May

To our EFB Flynnmate Jack Marino, Writer & Director of FORGOTTEN HEROES, a magnificent tribute to veterans, and (at least to my knowledge) the only war film ever made with scenes filmed at Mulholland Farm.

Bravo, Jack!

“Jack, you have helped enhance the lives of our Nation’s military and veterans and I appreciate your efforts to honor these heroes” Your support of these selfless warriors reflects the best of the American Spirit and I am grateful for your compassionate work.’

– President George W. Bush – White House Letter July 21, 2008

forgottenheroesthemovie.com…

— Gentleman Tim

 

CHARGE!

24 Apr

At the TCM Classic Movie Festival

Friday, April 27, 2018

THE CHARGE OF THE LIGHT BRIGADE(1936)

Of the eight films co-starring Errol Flynn and Olivia de Havilland, this romantic epic is one of the least seen, mainly due to complaints about the mistreatment of horses in the thrilling climactic charge inspired by Alfred Tennyson’s poem. In their second film together, Flynn is a British officer in India engaged to de Havilland only to learn she is in love with his brother (Patric Knowles). Departing liberally from history, the film suggests that the love triangle, as well as an act of betrayal by an Indian sultan, are inspiration for the famous charge that took place in 1854. The picture was also inspired by the success of Paramount’s The Lives of a Bengal Lancer (1935), which forced the production to add The Crimean War scenes at the end in order to avoid charges that they were just aping the earlier film. The picture was shot on a grand scale, with the construction of an entire British garrison in the California desert where the cast worked in severe weather conditions during the massive battle scenes. The use of trip wires led to the deaths of 25 horses, causing a fistfight between the passionate horseman Flynn and director Michael Curtiz. The result of the deaths kept Warner Bros. from reissuing the film and brought about stricter control from the U.S. government over animal use in filmmaking. (d. Michael Curtiz, 115m, 35mm)

filmfestival.tcm.com…

— Gentleman Tim

 

A Night at the Theater with Mel & Carl

24 Apr

April 23, 2018

LOS ANGELES — Mel Brooks is just two months shy of his 92nd birthday and he still carves out time for movie nights with his pal Carl Reiner. The two just recently got together to watch a restoration of the 1938 Errol Flynn and Olivia de Havilland classic “The Adventures of Robin Hood.”

This week, Brooks will be on hand to kick off the ninth annual TCM Classic Film Festival at the TCL Chinese Theater Thursday night in Hollywood with a special screening of the first film he ever directed: “The Producers.”

www.google.com…

— Gentleman Tim