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Archive for the ‘Directors’ Category

CHARGE!

24 Apr

At the TCM Classic Movie Festival

Friday, April 27, 2018

THE CHARGE OF THE LIGHT BRIGADE(1936)

Of the eight films co-starring Errol Flynn and Olivia de Havilland, this romantic epic is one of the least seen, mainly due to complaints about the mistreatment of horses in the thrilling climactic charge inspired by Alfred Tennyson’s poem. In their second film together, Flynn is a British officer in India engaged to de Havilland only to learn she is in love with his brother (Patric Knowles). Departing liberally from history, the film suggests that the love triangle, as well as an act of betrayal by an Indian sultan, are inspiration for the famous charge that took place in 1854. The picture was also inspired by the success of Paramount’s The Lives of a Bengal Lancer (1935), which forced the production to add The Crimean War scenes at the end in order to avoid charges that they were just aping the earlier film. The picture was shot on a grand scale, with the construction of an entire British garrison in the California desert where the cast worked in severe weather conditions during the massive battle scenes. The use of trip wires led to the deaths of 25 horses, causing a fistfight between the passionate horseman Flynn and director Michael Curtiz. The result of the deaths kept Warner Bros. from reissuing the film and brought about stricter control from the U.S. government over animal use in filmmaking. (d. Michael Curtiz, 115m, 35mm)

filmfestival.tcm.com…

— Gentleman Tim

 

A Night at the Theater with Mel & Carl

24 Apr

April 23, 2018

LOS ANGELES — Mel Brooks is just two months shy of his 92nd birthday and he still carves out time for movie nights with his pal Carl Reiner. The two just recently got together to watch a restoration of the 1938 Errol Flynn and Olivia de Havilland classic “The Adventures of Robin Hood.”

This week, Brooks will be on hand to kick off the ninth annual TCM Classic Film Festival at the TCL Chinese Theater Thursday night in Hollywood with a special screening of the first film he ever directed: “The Producers.”

www.google.com…

— Gentleman Tim

 

Mail Bag! French Curtiz Bio & Film Book!

16 Apr

Dear Sir,

For all those who love Curtiz and read French, I found this book. He presents an excellent biography and analyzes each of his films including his pre-Hollywood production.
Best – Erik Anzi
Thanks, Erik!

— David DeWitt

 

The Amazing Curtiz

15 Apr

Mano Kaminer > Mihaly Kertesz > Michael Curtiz

The Most Underated Director in the History of Hollywood?

“Curtiz was already a well-known director in Europe when Warner Bros. invited him to Hollywood in 1926, when he was 39 years of age. He had already directed 64 films in Europe, and soon helped Warner Bros. become the fastest-growing movie studio. He directed 102 films during his Hollywood career, mostly at Warners, where he directed ten actors to Oscar nominations. James Cagney and Joan Crawford won their only Academy Awards under Curtiz’s direction. He put Doris Day and John Garfield on screen for the first time, and he made stars of Errol Flynn, Olivia de Havilland, and Bette Davis. He himself was nominated five times and won twice, once for Best Short Subject for Sons of Liberty and once as Best Director for Casablanca.”

“Curtiz introduced to Hollywood a unique visual style using artistic lighting, extensive and fluid camera movement, high crane shots, and unusual camera angles. He was versatile and could handle any kind of picture: melodrama, comedy, love story, film noir, musical, war story, Western, or historical epic. He always paid attention to the human-interest aspect of every story, stating that the “human and fundamental problems of real people” were the basis of all good drama.”

What was his Greatest Film? Who were his Greatest Stars?

greatestmovies.quora.com…?

www.google.com…

— Gentleman Tim

 

The Ides of Flynn

15 Mar

Eighty-Five Years Ago Today (Sydney Time), on March 15, 1933, Errol Appeared Live AND On Film at the Prince Edward Theater in Sydney.

Errol was paid £2 to stand on stage in what he later described as a bad wig and bizarre naval uniform, appearing more like “an elderly keeper at a [Sydney brothel] than Fletcher Christian. The Ides of March ended bad for Caesar, but great for Flynn. It signaled the birth of Errol’s acting career.

A superb assembly of contemporaneous news articles by EFB Author “Isabel Australis”:

“In the wake of the bounty” 1933

An intriguing history with some Errol and errors:

books.google.com…

And here’s the cinematic Flynn himself, just as he appeared at the Prince Edward Theater, eighty-five years ago today, March 15, 1933 – On the Ides of Flynn:

— Gentleman Tim

 

A Curious Pair

10 Mar

At the Wilder Theater on Wilshire, in Westwood

www.laweekly.com…

The Adventures of Robin Hood swoops into the Billy Wilder Theater to restore a measure of innocence to the jaded moviegoer. Splendidly operatic in style and resplendent in its Technicolor trappings, the film endeared Errol Flynn to a Depression-era audience and secured his place in the Hollywood pantheon. Director Michael Curtiz replaced William Keighley when Warner Bros. decided that the action needed more oomph, and the film certainly doesn’t lack for excitement, particularly during the climactic swordfight with Basil Rathbone. UCLA Film & Television Archive is pairing it with Flynn’s American debut, The Case of the Curious Bride, as part of its tribute to Curtiz. Alan K. Rode will sign copies of his new Curtiz biography in the lobby prior to the screening.

UCLA’s Billy Wilder Theater, 10899 Wilshire Blvd., Westwood; Fri., March 9, 7:30 p.m.; $10. (310) 206-8013, cinema.ucla.edu….

— Gentleman Tim

 

A Spring Training Quiz

03 Mar

It’s 3/3, Baseball Spring. So here’s a FlynnQuiz involving the most famous No. 3 of all, Babe Ruth.

One was Ruthian, the other Errolympian.

Both were hugely popular and beloved stars, and still are.

One’s career ended in 1935, the other’s exploded in 1935.

It’s astonishing to me that there’s no record of Errol Flynn and Babe Ruth ever meeting. For example, it’s hard for me to believe that Babe never attended a party up at Mulholland. They did, however, both know a famous director. In fact, this director had a significant role in the film careers of both Errol and Babe. Indeed, it may be the case that Babe’s having worked with this famous director impeded Babe from meeting Errol. Whatever the reason here’s the quiz question:

What famous director did both Errol Flynn and Babe Ruth work with?

Pitch No. 1: It involved a very big and famous premier in New York.

Pitch No. 2: It did not involve the wonderful Harold Lloyd film depicted below.

Pitch No. 3: Nor did it involve the Gary Cooper and Teresa Wright masterpiece depicted below.

images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com…

Speedy: One of Harold Lloyd’s greatest, featuring Babe Ruth.

Pride of the Yankees: a heart-wrenching Super-Duper Gary Cooper movie, featuring the stunningly gorgeous and talented Teresa Wright. Look for Ruth in the beginning of this music video tribute.

— Gentleman Tim

 

Spring Training has Sprung

02 Mar

With March now here, Baseball’s Spring is here. Errol was far more well known for his wicket, wicket ways than for baseball, of course, but, living in the States in the 30’s, 40’s and 50’s, he most certainly was familiar with the American game and religion of Baseball, which was significantly based on the game of cricket he knew and played so well. Here he is playing the two at once, the only batsman I know of having posed and performed in such an extraordinarily (wicket) way (with Mayo on the side): www.gettyimages.com…

And here is another baseball rarity!

— Gentleman Tim

 

“Errol Flynn, the Face of Adventure”

23 Dec

If you’re in, near, or plannin’ on tourin’ Turin, you can join in to see Errol Flynn, il volto dell’avventura” celebrating (Italian Style) collaborations of Flynn and Curtiz, commencing in January with Captain Blood.

www.lastampa.it/2017/12/21/torinosette/eventi/in-bibliomediateca-omaggio-a-errol-flynn-FcOnEAOBl8fp82HJRhxPxN/pagina.html…

Monday, January 8, 2018

“The first review of the year in the bibliomediateca offers four films with Errol Flynn, led by the genius director Michael Curtiz: on the bill some of the best action and adventure films made in Hollywood between the thirties and forties. The review “Errol Flynn, the face of adventure” will be inaugurated by the screening of “Captain Blood” by Michael Curtiz, the film that marks the beginning of the artistic association between the actor and the director.”

— Gentleman Tim

 

“In the wake of the bounty” 1933

13 Jan

From TROVE Digitised Newspapers, National Library of Australia

Brisbane Courier Mail        23/03/1932

 

Mr Charles Chauvel who produced “The Moth of Moonbi” and “Greenhide,” in Queensland some year ago, is to produce a series of films for Expeditionary Films Ltd., a Sydney company. Mr Chauvel, accompanied by his wife Elsa, and a camera staff, will travel far from the beaten track in search of cinema material. Adventure and romance are to predominate in the films, to be produced by this company.

Besides a feature film, Mr. Chauvel will make a series of historical and travel films.  These will be recorded with German and French dialogue as well, as English.   Mr Chauvel will commence production next month at the studio of Australasian Films, Bondi, Sydney.

 

 

Sydney Morning Herald        23/08/1932

 

MUTINY OF THE BOUNTY –  Reconstructed for Films.   Mr. Charles Chauvel returned to Sydney on

Saturday, after travelling 15,000 miles in little known parts of the Pacific Ocean, to make a film depicting the mutiny of the Bounty for Expeditionary Films, Ltd., an Australian company.  Every effort has been made to produce the film historically, and present a faithful picture of the wanderings of the mutineers, before they reached Pitcairn Island, where they burned the Bounty,

 

And Lieutenant Bligh’s epic voyage of 4000 miles, in an open boat to Batavia, after he had been cast adrift with l8 loyal members of his crew.  Mr. Chauvel followed the route of the Bounty and saw the remains of the ship lying in the clear water at Pitcairn Island.  Native dances were filmed at Tahiti, where the mutineers stayed. Natives had to be specially chosen, as knowledge of primitive dances Is rapidly dying out.

Members of the party had an unpleasant experience at Pitcairn Island. They were Inspecting the coast in an open boat, when the engine failed, and they were blown out to sea.  They managed to make repairs just before sunset, and made a dangerous return to the Island through the surf, which is always heavy.

Mr. Chauvel said that his company believed that Australian history was too much neglected, and attempts would be made to fill in the gaps.  Arrangements have been made for copies of the film to be prepared with Spanish and German comment.

 

Sydney Morning Herald     15/03/1933

EXPEDITIONARY FILMS LTD.  “BOUNTY” PICTURE LAUNCHED !!

 

To-day, at the Prince Edward Theatre, the film, “In the Wake of the Bounty,”  which Mr. Charles Chauvel produced recently, with Tahiti and Pitcairn Islands as the principal backgrounds, will be given its first public screenings.

At the Australia Hotel yesterday, the directors of Expeditionary Films Ltd., under whose auspices Mr. Chauvel has made the film, entertained members of the Press and the motion picture Industry at luncheon.

Mr. S. Utz (Chairman of Expeditionary Films, Ltd.) presided.  COL. M. P. Bruxner, who is a member of the company, outlined some of the difficulties which Mr. Chauvel had had to face In making the film;  difficulties of transport; difficulties of organisation; and, finally, difficulties of censorship. The members of the company, being amateurs in the film business, had been amazed, and then appalled, at the amount of obstinacy and pugnacity which had to be displayed, before a film finally reached its public.

 

Mr. C. Brunsdon Fletcher spoke of the essential soundness and solidarity of the British Empire, in a world where every other nation was reeling beneath the shock of disaster (the depression).  After all, it was human character, as expressed in national outlook, which remained the predominating factor.  The producers of this film had done something decisive and valuable to make their country known elsewhere.

Mr. Hec C. MacIntyre (Managing Director of Universal Films – Aust) said that his Company considered it was only doing Its duty in trying to establish Australian films abroad. The launching of the Australian product In England, was no easy matter, either.  The English exhibitor was conservative. He preferred to concentrate on English and American productions.  Some of the earlier Australian films had been extraordinarily difficult to market. In Mr. Chauvel’s picture, however, he was confident that he had something to appeal to the tastes of the whole world.

Mr. H. Saxton (Secretary of Expeditionary Films) also spoke.

 

The West Australian        1 December, 1933

 

IN THE WAKE OFfHE BOUNTY              New Australian Production.

 

Travelogues and dramas have drenched the screen- with the- spray of South Sea beaches until the film-goer imagines that he knows every angle from which a palm can be photographed. Then an Australian, Mr. Charles Chauvel,. makes ‘In the Wake of the Bounty,’ and presents the Pacific under a strange and cloudy beauty, such as has not been filmed.  Mr. Chauvel, however, is more concerned with the savage languor of the tropics; he masses the brilliance of wild dances and flowers to show the pathetic contrast between the islands, which link that famous mutiny, Tahiti and Pitcairn, writes the Film Editor of the Sydney ‘Sun.’

Thus that first part of the. film is a glamorous reconstruction of history, with young Errol Flynn playing the part of Fletcher Christian – Mayne Lynton that of Bligh, and Victor Gouriet that of the blind fiddler, who tells the tale.  The scenes aboard ship are effectively done; then, by filming the journey made down the

Pacific by the Chauvels themselves, Pitcairn comes into view and the title of the picture falls into its proper pace.

 

The latter sequences of the film admirably bear out the intention of the producers (Expeditionary Films, Ltd.) to chart the unknown tracts of the world.  Pitcairn, of which the serious and religious people, appalling surf and precipices, prim houses and vegetable patches, are shown in absorbing detail, is one of those places which, as the steamer route moves farther out, will be less frequently visited.

Drama as well as travel has been caught by the film; human romances, swift tragedies, interludes as exciting as any fiction, all enthral the audience.

‘In the Wake of. the Bounty’ will be shown at the Theatre Royal in December, with ‘Leave it to Me’ (Gene Gerrard).

 

“In the wake of the Bounty” 1933 (24)

 

Australian Screen Site

Errol Flynn

Photo of Errol Flynn 1933

As a cast member:   Errol Flynn as Fletcher Christian 1933

In the Wake of the Bounty (1933)

This list shows all the titles currently on australianscreen , that include Errol Flynn in a principal role.  It is not a comprehensive screen-o-graphy.

Singleton Argus           30/01/1933

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NEW SOUTH SEAS FILM – CENSOR OBJECTS TO DANCE SCENES.

– SUPERVISED BY CLERGYMAN.

 

The South Seas film “In the Wake of the Bounty,”  which the Commonwealth Censor  (Mr Creswell O’Reilly) insists must be submitted for certain cuts, will be placed before the Censorship Appeal Board by the’ producer, Mr Charles Chauvel who said that the dance scenes to which Mr. O;Reilly had objected, had been supervised in the making, by a Methodist clergyman.

 

Sydney Morning Herald       11/02/1933

 

Top of Form

THE “BOUNTY” FILM.                         Appeal to Minister for Customs.

 

Mr. Charles Chauvel, who directed “In the Wake of the Bounty,” staled last night that the Censorship Appeal Board had considered the film, and announced its decision.  When the sections of the picture photographed in Tahiti came before the Commonwealth Film Censor (Mr. O’Reilly) recently. ? he ordered three excisions before the film could be publicly screened within Australia.  He also ordered that a cut should be made In the section photographed within the Commonwealth, before the completed film could be exported lo other countries.  The Appeal Board passed every part of the production except

one set of incidents which relate to a native dance.

Mr. Chauvel declares that he and his Board ol Directors intend to carry their case from the Appeal Board to the Minister for Customs.  They feel, he says, that their film has been unfairly chosen  for attack, while foreign productions embodying the same type of incident, have been allowed admission to this country, without comment.

If the Minister fails to reverse the decision of the Appeal Board”, he goes on, “In the Wake of the Bounty” will not be screened in Australia.  Its’ owners will simply send it abroad, and concentrate on the oversea market  The scenes of the native dance are the pivot of the whole production.  If they are deleted, the film will be spoilt.”

 

National Screen Archives

 

Title No: 496
Title: IN THE WAKE OF THE BOUNTY : ORIGINAL RELEASE.    Country of Origin:  Australia
Production Date: 1932    Media: Film
Release Date: 15 March 1933    Duration:   01:04:00
Produced as: Feature Film    Category: DramaCast:    Marie Rosenfeld, Errol Flynn, Mayne Linton
Cinematographer/Director:  Tasman Higgins

Director:    Charles Chauvel

Company:  Expeditionary Films

Summary:  Retells the story of the mutiny led by Fletcher Christian in 1789 against William Bligh, depicting the fate of the mutineers on Tahiti and Pitcairn. — General notes: Shot on location and in Sydney. The wreckage in the film portrayed as that of ‘The Bounty’ is in fact that of ‘The Cornwallis’, which was wrecked in 1875. — Source:   Queensland Maritime Museum.

In 1935, M.G.M. bought American rights to the film and re-edited it to form two short travelogues, ‘Pitcairn Island Today’ (1935) and ‘Primitive Pitcairn’ (1936). These were used as promotional aids for the studio’s own production of ‘Mutiny on the Bounty’.

Source: Australian Film 1900-1977, Andrew Pike and Ross Cooper.

 

 

— Isabel Australis