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Archive for the ‘Promo’ Category

Errol Flynn Adventures! The Board Game!

25 Nov

Rory Flynn tells me she just signed a contract to allow a new board game to be produced based on movie adventures of her father Errol Flynn! She sends us a copy of the proposal ad … No idea when the game would be available as yet but how exciting is this?

Thanks, Rory!

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— David DeWitt

 

Robert Matzen, Trudy McVicker & James Stewart!

25 Oct


Robert Matzen has written a new book about the life of Jimmy Stewart and in the book he features someone many of us at The Errol Flynn Blog love very much: Trudy McVicker. Her connections to Flynn go deep. She encountered him as a young girl when he and his wife Pat were staying at a hotel in Germany and he smiled at her as he walked past her and of course she never forgot it. Later, she became great friends with Earl Conrad – the ghostwriter of My Wicked Wicked Ways who worked intimately with Errol to give the world his life story.

Robert writes to us:

David, my new book, “Mission: Jimmy Stewart and the Fight for Europe” is being released today and I’ve been meaning to contact you. Could you please let the Flynn network know that Trudy McVicker is featured in Mission because her life intersected with the Eighth Air Force on several occasions. I spent months working with her on her story as a witness to history and she is known by her birth name Gertrud Siepmann in the narrative. There are five short chapters that concern her.

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I approached Trudy to tell her story because I knew she was in the war but didn’t know any details. It turns out she remembers Kristallnacht pretty vividly and saw Hitler speak in 1939. She was a witness to the first RAF bombing of Germany in Wilhelmshaven in 1940 (after relentless night bombing the family fled to the country), and in 1944 she lived in Eppstein just northwest of Frankfurt when Jim and the boys flattened it. She remembers a B-17 crew of Americans that was captured and paraded down the Bergstrasse of Eppstein and she watched dogfights between Allied and Luftwaffe fighters. On one occasion she had to dive for cover when a P-47 Thunderbolt detected movement and swept down to “stitch the road.” Her mother and brother were wounded in another P-47 attack on a train they were riding in.

It was a difficult decision on her part to agree to be a part of the book because many of her memories are painful, and she was concerned how Stewart would be portrayed, as well as how her family would be seen given that her father was affiliated with the German Navy. But she did agree and now her precious link to history has been preserved in the book.

There are three supporting characters that help give a 360-degree view of Stewart’s world: Gertrud Siepmann the little German girl (12 when the war ended), Clem Leone, an American radioman from Baltimore, and Dolfo Galland, the commanding general of German fighters. With these three, we get to see not only what Jim saw from the flight deck of a B-24 but also the view amidships from the radio operator’s position, the view of the bomber stream from the German POV, and the effect of bombing on the ground as seen by the Siepmann family.

I have known Trudy for almost 40 years and the fact that she grew up in the middle of WWII was an abstract thing until I started to read some short stories she wrote about it and interview her for details. Last year Mary and I visited Eppstein where she lived and also Frankfurt, a city she still dearly loves. We even saw the very bomb shelter in Eppstein where she and her family would duck–it’s still there, carved into the rocky hillside with the big wooden doors padlocked (photo attached). The more we talked, the more things she remembered and the results are pretty spectacular.

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I thought your group would get a kick out of the fact that Trudy is having the spotlight shone on her. After her lifetime of generosity and helping others, nobody could possibly deserve it more.

Today is Mission’s official publication date and it’s already doing pretty well on Amazon. It was just a couple of hours ago rated a “must-read book of the week” by the New York Post. The website is www.goodknightbooks.com….

Thanks for agreeing to spread the word, Dave.

Robert

 

— You are very Welcome!

— David DeWitt

 

August 2016 Rockitt Magazine!

06 Aug

Featuring our Man Flynn!

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— David DeWitt

 

July 2016 Rockitt Magazine ready for viewing!

08 Jul

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July 2016 Rockitt Magazine

— David DeWitt

 

The June 2016 The Rock-itt Magazine is online!

07 Jun

Featuring Hobart to Hollywood: Beverly Aadland and The Big Boodle!

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— David DeWitt

 

Rory Flynn Speaks in Chicago!

16 May

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— David DeWitt

 

May 2016 Rock-itt Magazine!

06 May

The Rock-itt Magazine for May 2016 is now abailable! We follow the Rock-itt Magazine for its excellent series on our Man Flynn!

— David DeWitt

 

Master Flynn

29 Apr

Just watched this again a few days ago and was very happy with the real locations used rather than the back lot. Makes me wish Against All Flags was filmed in Europe too.
I think that many reviews in the book The Films Of Errol Flynn are a bit too critical and was happy to find this one.

MOVIE REVIEW
Master of Ballantrae’ at Paramount
H. H. T.
Published: August 6, 1953
With plenty of good, old-fashioned muscularity crowding a highly pictorial Technicolor frame, at least three-fourths of “The Master of Ballantrae” makes a rousing, spectacular outlet for a pair of estimable adventurers, Errol Flynn and the master himself, Robert Louis Stevenson. In the new Warner Brothers arrival at the Paramount yesterday, Mr. Flynn is leading a fine, predominantly British cast through one of the liveliest, handsomest and most absurd screen free-foralls ever to leave the Victorian talespinner’s pen.

If the excessive length and staggeringly heroic exploits can be pinned on Warners and Mr. Stevenson, respectively, no one, assuredly, should question the lavish elasticity of the proceedings. It is played well by the entire cast, and seasoned throughout with some brazen drollery. The film was gleamingly authenticized in such locales as Scotland, England and Sicily.

Herb Meadow’s adaptation fittingly charts a cluttered, tumultuous odyssey for the indefatigable protagonist, leader of the fiery Durisdeer clan and fugitive champion of the Stuart Restoration, as he engineers a magnificent career in high-seas piracy and returns home, a wiser, if no less boisterous, rebel. The direction of William Keighley is equally alert and scenic, whether scouring the craggy, heather-strewn battlegrounds of the clansmen or capturing the lusty barbarism of the pirates’ island sanctuary. And since the dialogue is more often pungent than standard, the motivations and characterizations retain a surprising air of conviction, for all the flying kilts, sabers and sails.

Mr. Flynn is, in turn, bold, roguish and forgiveably self-satisfied in his best swashbuckler since “The Sea Hawk,” thirteen long years ago. The featured players, a spanking round-up, are crisp, restrained and forceful, one and all, particularly Roger Livesey and and Anthony Steel, and the ladies in the case, Beatrice Campbell and Yvonne Furneaux.

Last but not least, the truly stunning color photography of that British ace, Jack Cardiff, provides a canvas that stands as a model of its kind and fully rates the classic archive reserved for Mr. Stevenson, long, perhaps, after Mr. Flynn and company are forgotten. Meanwhile, Mr. Flynn is having himself, as well he might, a field day.

THE MASTER OF BALLANTRAE, screen play by Herb Meadow, based upon the Robert Louis Stevenson story directed by William Keighley and presented by Warner Brothers.
Jamie Durisdeer . . . . . Errol Flynn
Col. Francis Burke . . . . . Roger Livesey
Henry Durisdeer . . . . . Anthony Steel
Lady Alison . . . . . Beatrice Campbell
Jessie Brown . . . . . Yvonne Furneaux
Lord Durisdeer . . . . . Felix Aylmer
MacKellar . . . . . Mervyn Johns
Arnaud . . . . . Jack Berthier
Mendoza . . . . . Charles Goldner
Maj. Clarendon . . . . . Ralph Truman

— twinarchers

 

outakes

18 Apr

Pretty cool….

— Sergio

 

Captain Blood

18 Apr

At first I thought I had found an image called a storyboard but this was not the case.

— twinarchers