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EF TV- Playhouse 90

22 Mar

Dear fellow Flynn fans,

here`s a little appeTVizer of Errol`s 1957 television outing “Without incident”, a back to the boots western starring Ann Sheridan, John Ireland and Julie London.

Ann steals the scene chanting the English folksong “Greensleeves”, baiting the about- to- attack- Apaches.

Enjoy,

— shangheinz

 

Traveling Time & World with the Errol Flynn Theatre

18 Mar

1000th Night of Don Juan (January 2, 1958) (On the Road from Venice to Padua)

Declasse (April 5, 1957)

Girl in Blue Jeans (February 22, 1956)(1950’s England)

Fortunes of War (October 11, 1956) (Revolutionary France)

Rescued (April 13, 1957)

The Duel (June 6, 1956)

The Kinsman (June 12, 1956)

The Sealed Room (January 12, 1956)

Strange Auction (Ireland) (May 17, 1957)

Wife of the Czar (Russia) (September 16, 1956)

— Gentleman Tim

 

Eireann Errol?

17 Mar

How Irish was Flynn?

Still widely regarded as an Irishman, even more so in his Hollywood hey days, how Irish was Errol in reality? Genetically and culturally?

The name Flynn and his father’s apparent ancestral and professional connections to Ireland seem to indicate Errol had some significant percentage of Irish blood, but how much? He also seemed to treasure and/or at least play up his Irish. He may not have liked being portrayed as a American-Irish motorcycle cop, as he was initially by Warners, but he did seem to relish the roles of Peter Blood and Gentleman Jim. His fighting spirit appeared Irish in nature also. And he did go by Flynnie in his early days. How much of it was real, and how much was theater, perhaps designed to make big green off of the huge population of Irish-American movie fans?

What do you think, me fellow fans of Flynn?

www.bbc.com…

www.irishnews.com…

— Gentleman Tim

 

Companion Piece

16 Mar

A QUIZ

Adjunct to the “(Cooking) Out Like Flynn” post put up earlier today, I offer the following quiz:

With what poet did Errol once share a steak and very-specially-boiled potato on the beach?

Clue Numero Uno: A renowned travel and culinary writer raved about the potato.

Clue Numero Dos: It happened in F.L.A.

Clue Numero Tres: At least two of the three steak and potato eaters mentioned were authorities on cocktails.

— Gentleman Tim

 

(Cooking) Out Like Flynn

16 Mar

IT WAS EIGHTY YEARS AGO TODAY
March 16, 1937, in the Los Angeles Evening Herald Express

_______________

Green Light Hero Does His Cooking Best Outside

In the opinion of Errol Flynn, cooking is best in the great open spaces.

Flynn, the Irish actor, author, world-traveler and soldier-of-fortune now starring in the Cosmopolitan production of Green Light, which closes tonight at Warners’ Hollywood and Downtown, is a great admirer of culinary delicacies.

“You can’t do food real justice,” he contends “unless it’s cooked in the open. I’d trade the finest kitchen range anytime for a small plot under the trees by an open stream.”

Flynn learned the art of cookery beside roaring bonfires. His tutors were natives of New Guinea, Australia, and the uncharted islands in the South Seas.

He discovered that they know more about cooking and seasoning than most of the civilized races of the earth.

_______________

Here’s Errol shopping on Catalina for one of his famous pig-on-a-spit backyard roasts:

And here he is on a picnic with Livvie:

— Gentleman Tim

 

Errol’s Barman at “London’s Most Famous Hotel”

15 Mar

Here’s the story on Joe Gilmore, former barman at the Savoy Hotel’s “American Bar” in London.

i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/03550/gilmore2_3550591b.jpg…

Flynn, Neil Armstrong, Lady Di, he served them all.

For Errol, served rare Vodka with red pepper, as recounted in the article below.

www.independent.co.uk/topic/errol-flynn…

Errol at the Savoy in ’54, Joe’s first year at the “American Bar”
media.gettyimages.com…

Here’s Errol at the Savoy, Joe’s first year at the Savoy’s American Bar:
media.gettyimages.com…

— Gentleman Tim

 

Flynn Lines & Flynnish Lines

14 Mar

What are Flynn’s most famous lines and alleged lines? What are your favorites?

Here are six to kick off the post.

— Gentleman Tim

 

“Situation Dynamite”

14 Mar

— Gentleman Tim

 

Errol, David Niven, ‘Objective Burma’ and the English.

10 Mar

Per corollary of the ‘Objective Burma’ controversy, it is sometimes alleged that Errol harboured anti-British sentiments and vice versa. In fact, he was an ardent admirer of Churchill, and, as we know, the King and Queen.

This erroneous impression arose from two things, neither of which were Errol’s fault. The first was press speculation as to why he did not join up when Britain declared war on Germany (he was, after all, Tasmanian), and a few years later, why he did not join up when the US entered the war.

I am afraid that ‘anti-Errol’ prejudice was fuelled by his former friend, colleague and housemate, David Niven.

Niven came from a military background and had been educated at Stowe House (England’s first ‘progressive’ boarding school, but not quite progressive enough for the young Niv ,who was as sexually precocious as Errol).

After leaving Stowe he joined a Scottish regiment, before deciding on a career in acting. In Hollywood, however, he remained very ‘British’ and never took out US citizenship.

Deeply patriotic, when Britain declared war on Germany, Niven returned to England at once to take up his commission. He also let it be known, in private, that he believed ‘others in Hollywood’ – it was easy to guess to whom he referred – were guilty of dereliction of duty. Errol was Australian and in those days, when Australia was still part of the Empire, it counted as being British.

 

Lieutenant-Colonel Niven with his first wife, Primula Rollo.

Later, after Errol’s death, the usually affable Niven returned to the subject in his rather brilliant memoir of Hollywood, ‘Bring on The Empty Horses.’ .

This was the sequel to the bestselling ‘The Moon’s A Balloon’ , which vies with Errol’s ‘My Wicked, Wicked Ways’ as the best autobiography by an actor. I will stick my neck out here and say that Niven, stylistically, was a better writer – though less profound. I am judging this not on ‘My Wicked, Wicked Ways’, as we don’t know how much was written by Errol and how much by Earl Conrad, but on ‘Beam Ends.’

Niven devoted a whole chapter to Errol. Most of it is affectionate, yet because of this one incident when Errol seemingly ‘chose not to fight for his country’, there is a sour note and the general reader not versed in Flynnography would have had the impression that the lovable, good-eggish Niven regarded Errol as as a highly amusing 18-carat shit.

Sadly, very few people in the US , and probably no-one in the UK at that time, were aware of how desperate Flynn had been to enlist. Had Niven  known the truth, he would have behaved quite differently.

But it is indubitably true that the controversy surrounding Errol’s ‘war record’, had not been helped by ‘Objective Burma’.

The film, as we have noted, had Winston Churchill and other senior politicians, as well as the British press and public foaming a la bouche.

It matters not one hill of beans if politicians or newspaper editors are upset. It is part of their job. Ordinarily, little upset Churchill – at least not in public. But what got under his skin – and he was a quarter American himself – was the very real anguish felt by British soldiers and the families of British war dead.

It has been asserted again and again, by both British and US military historians, that Burma was a British and Australian theatre of war, not an American one, and that the British incurred heavy losses there. The majority of Allied forces in Burma were British, South African, Australian, Indian and Chinese. The film caused offence not only in Britain, but in Singapore. Nor did it go down well with the Australians.

But the film was not banned in Britain and Singapore, as I originally and mistakenly suggested. Warner Bros pulled it from release in the UK after one week, horrified and dismayed by the offence it caused. The film was re-released in Britain in 1952, but only with a grovelling disclaimer.

Of course the British press was quite wrong to take its ire out on Errol. All blame lay with Warner Bros, but it is always more profitable to be iconoclastic – especially when the icon to be toppled had made his career out of portraying action heroes in the cinema.  Errol was an easy target, already notorious in his personal life, and a ‘shirker’ to boot.

A leading English newspaper printed a cartoon with the line: ‘Excuse me, Mr Flynn, but you are treading on some graves.’ From what I have heard and read, Errol was very distressed by this, and as a result, turned a bit sour on ‘Objective Burma’ (though he did regard it as one of his best dramatic performances), but was, of course, unable to defend himself.

Over ‘ere, Errol was ‘rehabilitated’ a long time ago. He is also taken very seriously as an actor. The Guardian newspaper recently ran a piece praising  Errol as a man, a writer and an actor, and six months ago there was an Errol Flynn season on the BBC with commentary by some very distinguished people.

Christopher Lee, shortly before he died, narrated a very good documentary on Errol, commissioned by British television, which set the record straight and shows Flynn in an almost shining light. In fact, Flynn has never been so ‘In’.

And how can Brits not love him? No other film star personified English ‘chivalry’ the way Errol did, not to mention what is called ‘English Exceptionalism.’

‘Objective Burma’, however, cannot be rehabilitated as a ‘factually based’ film on any level, and was, to put it mildly, a little impolite to America’s Allies.

The Guardian, which is a left-leaning broadsheet, and if anything, tends to mock or denigrate British military achievements, wrote the most balanced, recent article on the subject of the film. Yes, it was a great war movie, but it was horribly insensitive and should not have been released so quickly, when British wives, mothers, and children were mourning the loss of their men.

(An interesting note. Lester Cole, who co-wrote the script, became notorious himself a few years later when HUAC accused him of ‘Un-Americanism’,  and he became one of black-listed ‘Unfriendly Ten.’ Perhaps ‘Objective Burma’ was jinxed?)

Here is a link to the article

www.theguardian.com…

— PW

 
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Speaking of Burma …

08 Mar

Errol starred in a movie which included an actor in key role who in real life served in America’s Burma campaigns. This actor even had a hand in bombing the equivalent of the fictional but fact-based “Bridge Over the River Kwai”?

Here’s some Jeopardy-like music for you to listen to while you contemplate who this actor was:

— Gentleman Tim