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Archive for the ‘Flynn and…’ Category

Tony Praises Errol

11 Jan

Loew’s Seventy-second Street Theater, Manhattan

From “Tony Curtis: The Autobiography

When you’re a kid, you don’t know you’re going to grow up. You just look at big people and you don’t believe it’s going to happen to you. It has no reality. You’re not quite sure who you are or what you are, and a lot of time you’re not happy about that, or anything else.

Then all of a sudden you go into a building. It’s dark. It’s got thirty-five-foot-high black-and-white images of people doing the most incredible things you’ve ever seen. What an extraordinary environment. For an hour or two in that warm, different planet, whatever problems I had faded away. It was as calm and reassuring as a church. It was almost always open for business. You could go in and sit down quietly in the dark, and all that anguish going on around you outside disappeared. I could sob if I wanted, or I could just be quiet and look up at the screen. Those experiences were very intoxicating and important for me. Now and then I thought that I would like to bounce around up on that screen too.

The Charge of the Light Brigade was the most important movie to me when I was a kid. What a picture! I watched it over and over at Loew’s Seventy-second Street, glued to my seat up in the loge and forgetting everything around me. I had no sense of my body at all; just of perceiving those images on the screen and the thunder of all those sounds. The way Errol Flynn sacrificed his life for his brother, who was in love with that girl. I can still see it today in my head, the one brother knocking out the other and taking his place. It brought tears to my eyes, that sacrifice. Maybe because it was around the same time I lost my own brother.

The Adventures of Robin Hood, too, was a fabulous picture I loved so much. It was the first color movie I ever saw. Flynn’s insouciance, his daring; it was so appealing I could picture him walking into any pool room in Manhattan and just taking over. I loved Errol. He was lean and mean and strong.

— Gentleman Tim

 

Feliz Año Nuevo, 1938

31 Dec

New Year’s Day, 1938

Louella O. Parsons
Los Angeles Examiner

Happy New Year!

Very little whoopie in Hollywood this year to herald in the New Year. Many of the stars went to the desert for a quiet New Year’s Eve and those who didn’t went to bed early to attend the races at Santa Anita or the football game at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena. Our sport-loving stars had a difficult time choosing between the game and the races, but a poll taken disclosed that the races won by a large majority.

Socially the most important events were a dinner given by Grace Moore and Gladys Swarthout, a small gathering of Marion Davies’ close friends at her beach house to celebrate her birthday, and a celebration at the Charlie Chaplin mansion.

The Bing Crosbys partied with a few congenial friends, including Andy Devine. But Bing had big business at Santa Anita, so he didn’t stay up late.

Marlene Dietrich, Myrna Loy and Arthur Hornblow Jr., Bette Davis and Harmon Nelson,  George Brent, the Robert Youngs, Jeanette MacDonald and Gene Raymond saw the New Year in at Palm Springs, while the Charles Boyers, the Errol Flynns, and Brian Aherne chose the restful La Quinta for their holiday.

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— Gentleman Tim

 

Jack Marino’s Homage to Mulholland Farm, and Errol Flynn!

28 Dec

Our dear friend, and fellow blog member, Jack Marino, sends us three photos of his remodeled livingroom today at his beautiful home somewhere below the Hollywood hills in Los Angeles and there is something familiar about what he has done for all Flynn aficionados … it is a “time machined experience” as my good friend Dennis Mullen would say … Jack’s wife Louise loves the idea and is pleased with the results including the authentic green paint Jack added as a reminder of one of the other rooms in Flynn’s famous Mulholland Farm home that Jack visited often when it was abandoned for several years before it was torn down. Jack, his friend author Tony Thomas and Deirdre Flynn were there the day the home was torn down and Jack contributed rare photos from the Jack Marino Collection to the book ERROL FLYNN SLEPT HERE by Robert Matzen and Michael Mazzone. The livingroom of Mulholland Farm always fascinated Jack and he wondered what it would have been like to see it filled with furniture during his many visits to the house as he wandered the empty rooms showing the house to his visitors who made the pilgrimage to the property with him. Today, he finished a homage to Flynn’s storied home by recreating the basic design elements that were in Flynn’s comfortable livingroom. Jack’s space is not as large as Flynn’s but he made the most of the space he has which by most standards isn’t small …

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Jack tells me that his table was made to fit against the same kind of  wide windows that Flynn had facing the back yard and pool area of his home. Jack’s windows face his front yard but the amount of sun is the same. Jack’s table was made two feet wide to fit in the space in proportion to the furniture and he believes Flynn’s table was at least three feet wide. While everything in the room is not identical, Jack says, the placement is the same and the feeling you have walking into this room is the same he remembers from being in Errol’s livingroom and closing his eyes to imagine the furniture being there all of those years ago …  a table sized radio for the far corner of the room (looking toward the open front door in Jack’s photo above) would top off the whole recreation I think, Jack! I can’t wait to stop by and sit in that comfortable livingroom with you over a cup of Dennis Mullen’s Zaca Tea …

Well done, old boy …

Here is an UPDATE (December 2019): Jack added a bookshelf to the room with the same shelving that Errol had to the room and it has been in place for about a year and a half …

 

— David DeWitt

 

Hat’s Off, Mike

24 Dec

December 24, 1937

Jimmy Starr
LA Evening Herald Express

For a thrilling scene in Robin Hood, Errol Flynn threw a 15 pound spear through a window and is supposed to make it stick in the opposite wall. Flynn threw the spear, but his name was poor.

Lucky for director Michael Curtiz that he ducked in time.  The spear nipped off his hat, pinning it to the floor of the stage. “Are you hurt?” screamed the frantic Flynn.

“No, I am all right,” replied Mike, “but look at my hat — she is dead!”

— Gentleman Tim

 

Hark! ‘The Errol’ Moonbeams Shine!

21 Dec

America calling, PW …

Just in time for Christmastime – Our Lady in London – publishes Errol’s secret recipe!

“The Spectator magazine’s Christmas special is doubly festive this year, [including] an entry from journalist and high-society member Petronella Wyatt revealing details … of her favourite seasonal cocktail, “The Errol”, named after its inventor Errol Flynn.” [The Irish Times]

The Spectator Christmas Special

“My favoured cocktail for the Christmas alcoholiday is an invention of Errol Flynn’s. Flynn taught it to my late friend Diana, Countess of Wilton, back in the 1950s. Diana was a perfected presence, a swan among swans, and Flynn, who was living in Rome at the time, used to take her to lunch. Far from being a vulgar seducer, he liked to talk about Socrates and had wanted to become a writer. He was a tragic man, trapped by his own physical beauty. His eyes, the colour of Anatolian waters, had a terrible sadness. But he taught her to make a cocktail of such subtlety that it is like drinking moonbeams.”

“‘The Errol’ is a variation on a White Lady and I publish the recipe here for the first time. Into a cocktail shaker, pour 1 part gin, 1 part Cointreau and 1 part freshly squeezed lemon juice. Add a teaspoon of white rum. Shake with ice and serve in martini glasses.”

Thank you, Petronella, and Erroltime tidings!

— Gentleman Tim

 

Shine on you jazzy diamond

20 Dec

Dear fellow Flynn fans,

Errol`s silver screen antics and his real life persona inspired the title of this saxophone classic. First to be heard on Zaca in Jamaica, then in the musical nightclubs around the world. Here is the story how all that jazz came aboard, ehm about…

Enjoy,

 

— shangheinz

 

Friday the 13th, 1939 @ WB

13 Dec

“On Friday, January 13, 1939, a party was held on Stage 5 (now Stage 15) at Warner Bros. Studios in Burbank, California. The “Gay Lady Saloon” set from Warner’s Technicolor western spectacular Dodge City was still in use, having been dressed with additional props to celebrate that day’s Friday the 13th, and to poke fun at various other superstitions. Here is a selection of photos from that gathering, the original negatives of which were recently found deep in the WB archives.”

www.warnerbros.com…

Henry O’Neill, Alan Hale, Michael Curtiz. Errol

Errol & Olivia

Errol, between Rosemary and Priscilla Lane

The Dodge City “Gay Lady Saloon” Bar

— Gentleman Tim

 

The Perfect Specimen

11 Dec

December 11, 1937

WHAT THE PICTURE DID FOR ME

The Perfect Specimen: Errol Flynn, Joan Blondell — It is a natural. Plenty of clever stuff and Flynn and Blondell are good in the roles as the perfect man and the gal who knows what’s good for him — A.E. Goodman, Columbia Theatre, Columbia City, Ind. General Patronage.

— Gentleman Tim

 

Issa Flynn!?

09 Dec

 

 

 

 

Dear fellow Flynn fans,

here is a photo showing Abraham Elias Issa, prominent hotel owner of Jamaica’s famous Myrtel Bank Hotel in the company of a couple  and a fella who looks like but doesn‘t grin like Flynn.

Is it a weary Errol or an Errorol (maybe one of these: www.theerrolflynnblog.com…) ?

The lovely lady in the picture doesn‘t care, she seems to have made up her mind to make the most of the moment. Issa hosted the creme de la creme of stars  like Lawrence Olivier and Vivian Leigh, Walt Disney and Winston Churchill, Ava Gardner and Louis Armstrong at his destinct resort. He and our Hollywood hero were friendly, so there is a chance this is Ol‘ Errol with his hair parted very strictly. Real deal or heel- what‘s your educated guess…

Enjoy,

 

— shangheinz

 

These Three

07 Dec

December 6, 1937

Evening Herald Examiner

Errol Flynn, Barbara Stanwyck and Mary Astor in These Three on Theater of the Air, directed by Cecil B. DeMille, tonight on KNX at 6 p.m.

****

— Gentleman Tim