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Archive for the ‘Co-Stars’ Category

Introducing Errol Flynn

24 May

    Hollywood Citizen News – Behold Them Minus Hokum by Peter Pry – December 1, 1934

    Errol Flynn, newly arrived Irish actor, will have to call out the police reserves for protection
    when the local gals discover that he is independently wealthy and doesn’t need to act for a living.
    Flynn has lots of that appeal too, and is a husky specimen. He hewed a fortune out of a gold mine in
    New Guinea, he represented Ireland as a boxer in the Olympic games of 1928, he has braved cannibals,
    is 25, and has never been married! He has only been acting for two years. And he refused the role
    of Oberon in A Midsummer’s Night Dream because he didn’t want to start his film career by
    playing the king of the fairies.

    Los Angeles Evening Express – Harrison Carroll – December 3, 1934

    Actors making their debut in Hollywood usually proceed cautiously. Not so, Errol Flynn,
    the 25-year-old Irishman signed by Warner Brothers. In his biography charge, which all
    newcomers are asked to fill out, Flynn gave some answers that made the boys eyes pop out.
    For one thing, he listed actors as his pet aversion. And there were some hotter ones but
    we can’t go into them.

    Flynn is 6 feet 2, weighs 180 pounds and his hands are calloused. He is a descendant of
    Fletcher Christian , of the crew of the famous British ship, the Bounty. He was once a
    pearl fisherman and he made a good stake for himself prospecting for gold in the heart of
    New Guinea. In 1928, he represented Ireland in the boxing events of the Olympic Games.

    And his description of Douglas Fairbanks Jr. will get a chuckle out of Hollywood. Young Doug,
    he says, has dveloped an Oxford accent so thick that it is hard for even English people to
    understand him.

    Los Angeles Examiner – Lloyd Pantages – January 29, 1935

    Errol Flynn is not only a good looker, but a swell actor, so keep your eyes open for this gentleman.

    Los Angeles Evening Herald Express – Elizabeth Yeaman – February 5, 1935

    Despite the fact that Errol Flynn is an extremely handsome young Irishman and fairly bursting with
    personality, Warners have cast him as a murderer for his film debut here. He will be the villain in
    The Case of the Curious Bride, in which Warren Williams has the lead of the sleuthing attorney.

    Hollywood Citizen News – Elizabeth Yeaman – March 26, 1935

    Errol Flynn, the husky Irish actor at Warners, gets his second film assignment. He will be seen as a
    pirate with Robert Donat in Captain Blood. Now it is uncertain if Jean Muir will have the
    feminine lead.

    Tanikiu Tumas to King Karl Holmberg for the articles and Flynnspiration!

    — Gentleman Tim

     

Errol Saves England (Again) — Eighty Years Ago

15 May

An EFB Four Score News Report: The Anniversary of The Prince and the Pauper

Louella O. Parsons – Extract from the Los Angeles Illustrated Daily News – May 12, 1937

“Miles Herndon, dashing soldier of fortune, delivers the rightful prince.
Warners are indeed fortunate in having Errol Flynn in the family to play Herndon.
Where I ask you, is there a more suitable actor for a role that calls for
a handsome devil-may-care adventurer? Errol may have had bigger roles, but
never one that suited him better.”

Elizabeth Yeaman – Extract from the Hollywood Citizen News – May 13, 1937

With the coronation in England dominating the headlines for days, nothing
could have been more timely than Warners’ film version of The Prince and
the Pauper, which is climaxed by an elaborate coronation sequence.

Harrison Carrol – Extract from the Los Angeles Evening Herald Express – May 13, 1937

If Mark Twain had been alive today and had written The Prince and the Pauper
under Hollywood assignment, he could not have turned out a more perfect screen
story for this coronation year and for two extraordinary child actors, Billy
and Bobby Mauch.

In its spectacular and veracious coronation scenes this is as timely a picture
as could be asked.

It is Errol Flynn, playing a good natured soldier of fortune, who takes the young prince under his wing – not the least believing his story – and finally clears the way for a nick-of-time restoration of the royal youth, just as the unwilling beggar boy is about to be crowned king of England. In the role, Flynn is a dashing figure.

Warners have made the coronation ceremony one of the year’s spectacular screen episodes.

The Prince and the Pauper is an excitingly narrated, handsomely prodeuced, finely acted picture – an artistic achievement for producer Hal B. Wallis and all concerned – and a box-office natural.

Heading the supporting bill is a color short, A Day at Santa Anita.

Flynn saves England!

Just in time for the Coronation!

— Gentleman Tim

 

Speaking of Burma …

08 Mar

Errol starred in a movie which included an actor in key role who in real life served in America’s Burma campaigns. This actor even had a hand in bombing the equivalent of the fictional but fact-based “Bridge Over the River Kwai”?

Here’s some Jeopardy-like music for you to listen to while you contemplate who this actor was:

— Gentleman Tim

 

The perfect Flynn Girl?

08 Feb

I sometimes make mental lists of which actresses I would have liked to have seen play opposite Errol, and at the top is Eleanor Parker. The Canadian Parker was a classical, almost aristocratic beauty, given spice by her incredible slanted eyes, the colour of Anatolian waters, and her tumbling hair that reminds one of a winter sunset. She could dance, fight, play a queen or a serving wench with equal aplomb, was a fine comedienne and with her curves like the hull of the Zaca, looked sensational in a period costume, even when it bordered on the camp.

She starred in only one swashbuckler, a film we have been discussing –  Scaramouche – as the fiery on-off love interest of Stewart Granger. Able as Granger was in this picture (and in my view it was his best; with the exceptional six minute fencing match), he was a bit of a one-note as an actor and never quite did it for me in the boudoir department. How I wish it had been Errol sparring with Eleanor in glorious technicolour and exaggerated 18th Century costumes.

Eleanor Parker in Scaramouche

As a performer, Parker was streets ahead of 50s bombshells like Ava Gardner and Janet Leigh. A very distinguished actress, Parker was Oscar nominated more than once. She should have won for Interrupted Melody (1955), in which she played the crippled soprano Marjorie Lawrence, opposite Glenn Ford and a young Roger Moore.

Interrupted Melody

It is the best operatic biopic ever made, in my view (aside from The Great Caruso), and she gives a stellar and harrowing performance. See it if you can. I think it is on DVD.

Eleanor as Isolde

Parker also played Kirk Douglas’s troubled wife in Detective Story, a mid-50s noir – sadly, it was more grey than noir. She was also put in a second-rate Egyptian ‘adventure’, with an ageing Robert Taylor, called Valley Of the Kings (how very original.)

Had Eleanor been born ten years earlier she would have been a major star, but the more simplistic, epics with a moral, family-orientated Hollywood of the 1950s didn’t really know what to do with her.

It’s a shame that she is chiefly remembered now for playing the Baroness in The Sound of Music.

As the Baroness, with Christopher Plummer

 

What a gorgeous pair she and Errol would have made….

 

— PW

 

Passed in 2016 …

02 Jan

Did I miss it or did no one report on the fact that 2 Flynn alumni, from his very last dramatic appearance (The Golden Shanty), passed last year:

Patricia Barry (Adie Walker)

Arthur Hiller (Director) below with Errol.

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— Karl

 

Happy Thanksgiving EFB

24 Nov

happy-thanksgiving-efb

— Gentleman Tim

 

Movie Lot to Beachhead, 1945

22 Nov

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ERROL FLYNN – DON “RED” BARRY, HOAGY CARMICHAEL, HENRY O’NEILL, LOU “THE COSMIC PUNCH” NOVA, CHARLES J. WINNINGER, HOWARD HILL, HARRY VON ZELL, JIMMY “BABY FACE” McLARNIN, HUNTLEY GORDON, CHARLES D. COBURN, MONTY “THE BEARD” WOOLLEY, GENE AUTRY, LINDA DARNELL, CARY GRANT, ALEXIS SMITH, VICTOR McLEOD, ROBERT BARRAT, CHARLES KENYON, HELEN GERALD, GUINN “BIG BOY” WILLIAMS, RICHARD A. CARROLL, GORDON EDWARDS, CLYDE GERONIMI, EDDIE (EDWARD F. CLINES) CLINE, WILLIAM T. “W. T.” LACKEY

— Gentleman Tim

 

Live from Livvie’s

15 Nov

From Olivia’s childhood home in beautiful Saratoga, California:

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A fun and very informative circa 1990’s interview of Olivia from Saratoga, including some very humorous references to “touching bases” (and not touching bases) with Errol. (At ~ 12:00 and briefly at very end of interview.)

cmpm.appfolio.com…

— Gentleman Tim

 

The Great Race

06 Nov

Arrogate v. California Chrome. Names that would have worked well in Errol’s own stable.

It was a great day at the races today at Hollywood’s hometown horsetrack, Santa Anita, one of Errol’s favorite haunts, where he often played the ponies, and occasionally raced some of his own.

www.advantagewagering.com…

www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/destinations/northamerica/usa/8495591/Horse-racing-in-America-The-Hollywood-glamour-of-Santa-Anita-Park.html…

“America’s biggest race may be the Kentucky Derby, but Santa Anita – or ‘Hollywood’s Racetrack’ – in California wins in the glamour stakes.”

“Since Santa Anita Park opened back in 1934, the horse race track has been featured in numerous films, including A Star is Born (1954), Bob Hope’s The Lemon Drop Kid, the Marx Brothers film A Day At The Races and National Lampoon’s Vacation to name just a few.”

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satrack

— Gentleman Tim

 

Robin Hood Matte Painting and Behind The Scenes.

24 Oct

Film Grab

A Beautiful woman on a narrow stairway.

This was probably during the ransom robbery feast scenes.

Before Curtiz took over.

Are those stand ins for the final shot?

What were they discussing?

Some of these I have never seen before.

— twinarchers