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Archive for November, 2017

Beginning with Bettongs

29 Nov

From very early on, Errol exhibited an intense interest and unique talent for entrepreneurial adventure. Inspired by his father, this often involved scientific exploration and experimentation. Cruise of the Zaca is an eminent example.

But when and where did young Errol first profitably demonstrate this profound talent and interest? Evidence indicates it was in connection to Professor Flynn’s research into the reproductive biology of Tasmanian bettings. In fact, Errol essentially states so in My Wicked, Wicked Ways:

“When school finished, I raced home to be at his side, to hurry out into the back yard, where we had cages of specimens of rare animals… Through Father’s activity I made my first venture into commerce. He bought all the kangaroo rats [bettongs] he could get hold of for Hobart University. I learned to set box traps in the hills of near-by Mount Wellington. He paid a shilling a head.”

Putting Errol’s bettongs to exceptionally good use, Professor Flynn published a landmark paper in 1930 on the reproduction of the Tasmanian bettong.

Here is a rare nocturnal photo of the hard-to-catch, truffle-hunting Tasmanian bettong in the act of night-jumping.

And here is a spectacular view from Mt. Wellingon of the hills of Hobart where pre-teen Errol trapped bettongs for his father’s pioneering research into marsupials.

— Gentleman Tim

 

An Homage to Errol

27 Nov

“Wolverton is plainly an homage to the 1930s-1950s Australian actor Errol Flynn. He has Flynn’s flair, his womanising ways (having a hand chopped off would interfere in his removal of corsets, Wolverton quips), a Zorro-esque mask, and even Flynn’s pencil moustache. Only the épée is missing. Wolverton relies upon stealth, wit, and cunning, wise-cracking all the while.”

Wolverton, Thief of Impossible Objects

— Gentleman Tim

 

Seventy Years Ago Safari

24 Nov

Seventy years ago – during, prior to, and following the Thanksgiving holidays of 1947 – Errol was planning a major hunting expedition.

With what other person did Errol plan this safari, and in what country was it to take place??

¤ They planned to include about thirty (30) people.

¤ It was planned to last for about two months.

¤ They planned to record, ship, and broadcast clips of the expedition.

¤ It would involve big game hunting.

¤ The safari was to begin immediately after completion of The Adventures of Don Juan.

¤ It never happened.

— Gentleman Tim

 

Michael B. Druxman and FLYNN!

20 Nov
The Mail Bag brings us this good news!
Michael writes:

I just got word that the audio adaptation of FLYNN, my one-person stage play about Errol Flynn, is now available for download on Amazon, audible.com… and, within a day or so, iTunes. Sam Burns brings the screen’s most famous Robin Hood to life in this production, which has been enhanced with music and sound effects. Enjoy!

Michael B. Druxman
Please visit my author page at Amazon.com…
www.amazon.com…michaelb.druxman
Thanks, Michael!

— David DeWitt

 

“It’s Time You Knew”

20 Nov

“From a 1944 book It’s Time You Knew – a sort of Ripley’s ‘Believe it or Not’ book produced by Bulova and, it seems, given to customers in American watch shops.”

— Gentleman Tim

 

Michael Curtiz: a life in film!

19 Nov

— David DeWitt

 

Blood Connection

18 Nov

ERROL, PETER, AND THOMAS

www.newsletter.co.uk/lifestyle/nostalgia/irishman-s-great-crown-robbery-is-top-of-the-list-in-the-annals-of-historic-heists-1-8250389…

www.bbc.com…

“In London, Thomas Blood, an Irish adventurer better known as “Captain Blood,” was captured attempting to steal the Crown Jewels from the Tower of London.

Blood, a Parliamentarian during the English Civil War, was deprived of his estate in Ireland with the restoration of the English monarchy in 1660. In 1663, he put himself at the head of a plot to seize Dublin Castle from supporters of King Charles II, but the plot was discovered and his accomplices executed. He escaped capture. In 1671, he hatched a bizarre plan to steal the new Crown Jewels, which had been refashioned by Charles II because most of the original jewels were melted down after Charles I’s execution in 1649.

On May 9, 1671, Blood, disguised as a priest, managed to convince the Jewel House keeper to hand over his pistols. Blood’s three accomplices then emerged from the shadows, and together they forced their way into the Jewel House. However, they were caught in the act when the keeper’s son showed up unexpectedly, and an alarm went out to the Tower guard. One man shoved the Royal Orb down his breeches while Blood flattened the Crown with a mallet and tried to run off with it. The Tower guards apprehended and arrested all four of the perpetrators, and Blood was brought before the king. Charles was so impressed with Blood’s audacity that, far from punishing him, he restored his estates in Ireland and made him a member of his court with an annual pension.

Captain Blood became a colorful celebrity all across the kingdom, and when he died in 1680 his body had to be exhumed in order to persuade the public that he was actually dead.”

A Traditional History of Thomas Blood:

A Comical UK Documentary

Part One

Part Two

— Gentleman Tim

 

A whole new picture

16 Nov

Dear fellow Flynn fans,

is anyone familiar with the paintress Gudrun Sibbons? Errol and David Niven respectively are said to have owned some of her paintings. Here`s her bio for starters like me: www.artnet.com…

Enjoy,

— shangheinz

 

Museum of Flight & The Dawn Patrol with Errol Flynn!

10 Nov

Eric Tillerson sends us this via the Mail Bag:

Down at the Museum of Flight in Renton, Wa., in the WWI section, they have the coat that Errol wore in The Dawn Patrol on what I believe is permanent display, shown next to the Academy Award that the earlier Fairbanks version of the film won. Sadly they spell his name “Erroll”, but coming across this was still a nice surprise. Some photos attached.
Regards,
Eric
Thanks, Eric!

— David DeWitt

 

Kissing the Coloured Virgin

04 Nov

“Meet the man who knew and drew Picasso in Paris, Einstein and Churchill in London, and even lived with Errol Flynn in Sydney”

“Kerwin Maegraith, caricaturist, journalist and true Aussie larrikin, encountered the most famous people of his time from the 1920’s to the Sixties.”

www.adelaidenow.com…

“Well, one night Errol came home drunk. The old girl (the landlady) had lit the plaster statue of the Virgin with a candle at its foot. The statue was about five feet high and coloured. A big bunch of flowers stood at the foot of the image and Errol, thinking it was just another pretty girl, made a lunge. Both he and the statue, in a thousand bits, hurled down two flights of stairs. The enraged landlady, awoken from her slumber, tossed Mr. Flynn and his belongings right out on the footpath. But with his winning ways, Errol was back next morning and forgiven. He was about 17 or 18 at this time, as wild a young man as Sydney ever saw.”

— Gentleman Tim