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Archive for the ‘Ships & the Sea’ Category

Zaca Goes to War!

10 Aug

en.wikipedia.org…

 

— David DeWitt

 

Shelter from the Storms

08 Aug

[The storm at sea, and the storm on Lookout Mountain.]

August 10, 1938

Harrison Carroll
Evening Herald Express

Errol Flynn flew into town yesterday from his jaunt to the Cal-Neva Lodge and Reno. His yacht, the Sirocco, docked a few hours earlier at San Pedro. It ran into a storm after leaving Cape San Lucas, losing its mainsail and had to seek shelter until the wind blew itself out. Then, 100 miles south of Ensenada, it ran out of fuel and had to make a long tack out to sea to make the Mexican port. The overhaul will cost the actor a pretty penny.

The Story Behind California and Nevada’s Popular Shared Hangout Spot

— Gentleman Tim

 

Change of Mind?

07 Aug

August 8, 1938

Harrison Carroll
Evening Herald Express

Players change their minds so rapidly. Errol Flynn said he was sailing down the Mexican coast and that night he decided to go to Reno instead.

_____

Was the honeymoon over for Mr & Mrs Fleen?

The Reno Divorce Era

— Gentleman Tim

 

Summer of ’41

06 Aug

August 3, Off Catalina

“In August 1941 Peter Stackpole of LIFE Magazine joined Errol Flynn (1909–1959)—the swashbuckling leading man of The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938)—aboard Flynn’s yacht, the Sirocco, to photograph him for a story about his spearfishing skills. Also present were stuntman Buster Wiles, crew members, and three young women. One of them, fifteen-year-old actress Peggy Satterlee, later accused Flynn of raping her. The case, unsurprisingly, created a media storm.”

— Gentleman Tim

 

The Captain Blood Armada

24 Jul

July 24, 1935

Los Angeles Examiner

Warners Rush Ships for Scenes in Captain Blood

Construction of five pirate boats to be used in the filming of Captain Blood was being rushed on the Warner Brothers lot today, anticipating the picture’s going into production the first week of August.

The ships are being made under the supervision of Anton Grot, art director, who designed the lavish sets for A Midsummer’s Night Dream, Warner Brothers special directed by Max Reinhardt.

Although Captain Blood’s boat, the Arabella, is the smallest craft under construction, the combined efforts of Grot, his sixteen assistants and the studio department are so focused on the ship that it may be best of its kind ever turned out.

A group of professional boat builders have been recruited from local seaport towns, and professional ship painters also have been called in to work on the project.

Work on the “Captain Blood Armada” started early this year shortly after announcement by Warner Brothers that the filming of Sabatini’s pirate yarn actually would get under way this summer. The first steps taken were the collection of books on pirate craft and the tabulating of data to be used by Grot’s assistants in making working drawings. One of the research books used was “Souvenirs de Marine,” which went out of print in 1886. Another book studied was “Histoire de la Marine.”

Featuring Errol Flynn and Olivia de Havilland, Captain Blood is the first of twelve super productions to be made by Warner Brothers-First National. They are Anthony Adverse, Frisco Kid, Charge of the Light Brigade, Lafitte the Pirate Legionnaire, Ceiling Zero, Green Pastures, Petrified Forest, Radio Jamboree of 1935, and The Fighter.

— Gentleman Tim

 

The Gentleman from New Guinea

13 Jul

His name is Errol Flynn and into his twenty-six years he has crowded enough experience to satisfy a dozen men. While other actors played at life in stock company repertoire, he has been living it, with dauntless gaiety. Prospecting for gold in New Guinea,being ambushed by natives,negotiating peace between savage tribes, captaining a pearl-diving crew and a copra-trading ship, receiving plaudits as an Olympic athlete – all these activities have just been preparation for the greatest adventure of all, Hollywood.

Adventurer by instinct, he is now actor by accident, he says. However, having “happened into the movies” because of their call to his dramatic sense, and because he “hadn’t yet done them,” he finds them such a challenge that he feels he must make good, in order to prove himself to himself.

Lean and brown, gay and glamorous, no more engaging personality could be found to portray the reckless Captain Peter Blood in the Sabatini tale which records the exploits of a young Irish doctor, who is sold into slavery and turns pirate.

Flynn inherited his craving for excitement from his active ancestors. He is fighting his duels in “Captain Blood” with his historic family sword, which was presented to Lord Terrence Flynn by a loyal follower of the Duke of Monmouth in 1686, the period in which the film is set.

As a boy, Errol made sporadic attempts, invariably failures, to live up to the dignity of his scholarly surroundings. His father was a professor of biology at Cambridge. When Errol wasn’t reading adventure stories, or playing games, he cast fleeting glances at his books, in English and French schools.

Fame as a boxer, which he won at nineteen at the Amsterdam Olympics, failed to satisfy his budding, restless vitality. Probably swaggering a bit in his strong, young manhood, he went to New Guinea where, as British Agent, he was sent out to make peace between native tribes. Learning their dialiects was not difficult, because they have few words and no tenses.

“I would point to objects and try to copy their grunts or shrill exclamations. After a time we would get together, more or less. Maybe,” his smile flashed, “that was where I got my training as an actor. I should be in pantomime, what?”

Silver Screen Magazine, January 1936

— Gentleman Tim

 

“The Bachelor”

02 Jul

July 2, 1937

Harrison Carroll
LA Evening Herald Express

“Never one to abide by Hollywood custom, Errol Flynn bought a small sailing yacht yesterday and announced that no women will be allowed on board.

In keeping with the policy, the star revealed he has decided to re-christen the yacht “The Bachelor.”

Which, of course, led someone to remind Flynn that he himself is no bachelor–still being married to the exotic French actress Lili Damita.

“She can’t come aboard the yacht either,” declared the Irish actor. “I never saw a woman yet who stand rough sailing without getting either sick or frightened. And I intend to have some real fun in this boat.”

The yacht, of modest size compared to most owned by Hollywood celebrities, was purchased by the star from George Arthur, the producer. It carries an auxiliary motor as well as sails.”

*******

Errol sails The Bachelor, aka Cheerio II

— Gentleman Tim

 

A Really Big Show

02 Jun

Errol Shows in Hollywood – Featuring Errol, Lili, Ed & Louella

***

May 30, 1938

Ed Sullivan
Hollywood Citizens News

Errol Flynn gets in June 4.

***

June 2, 1938

Louela O. Parsons
Los Angeles Examiner

Lili and Errol Flynn, no longer “among the missing,” planed on yesterday morning from Chicago.

— Gentleman Tim

 

Lost Again – The Mark of Zorro

27 May

May 26, 1938

Louella Parsons
Los Angeles Examiner

Errol Flynn is lost again between Havana and Hollywood.

May 28, 1938

Erskine Johnson
Los Angeles Examiner

Fox turned down Warners’ offer of $150,000 for film rights to Douglas Fairbanks’ old picture,
The Mark of Zorro. They wanted it for Errol Flynn.

— Gentleman Tim

 

Quite a Turn of Fortune

29 Apr

April 27, 1938

Harrison Carroll
Evening Herald Express

As this is written Flynn is still a holdout on returning to the studio. Warners wanted him badly for Sister Act, but Errol was delayed two and a half weeks in getting away from Miami and, so far, he is refusing to give up his vacation. Quite a turn of fortume for the Irish actor who, two short years ago, was glad to play a corpse in the Case of the Curious Bride.

***

— Gentleman Tim